Side Effects of Rimadyl in Dogs

 

In the past you may have seen television commercials showing previously lame dogs jumping and running about like young puppies. These commercials were promoting Rimadyl, a drug introduced in 1997 by Pfizer Chemical for the treatment of hip dysplasia and arthritis in dogs. What the commercials carefully avoided was any mention of the side effects of Rimadyl in dogs.

Today it’s no longer possible to see those commercials because the advertising was halted by Pfizer for good reasons.

As a dog owner, we are indebted to dogs like Montana, a six-year-old Siberian husky who had stiff legs. Montana was prescribed Rimadyl by his veterinarian and at first the drug appeared to work well.

But then Montana lost his appetite, wobbled when he walked, and finally was unable to walk at all. He began vomiting and had seizures; eventually his owner was forced to put him to sleep. An autopsy was performed which showed the presence of liver damage that could only be associated with a harmful drug reaction.

Drugs for pets are big business in the United States, as well as in many other countries where pet animals are valued. It is estimated that world-wide, the sale of these drugs total more than 3-1/2 Billion dollars annually. Rimadyl is one of the bestselling drugs included in this estimate.

Rimadyl has been prescribed for more than four million dogs in the United States alone, and has earned Pfizer tens of millions of dollars.

After introducing the drug, the company ran full-page magazine ads and a public-relations campaign that resulted in 1,785 print stories, 856 radio reports and more than 200 television news reports of the benefits of Rimadyl.

What dog owner whose beloved pet was suffering from arthritis or hip dysplasia wouldn’t want such a “miracle drug” for their pet?

But Rimadyl has also resulted in many debates and intense arguments between veterinarians and pet owners who were furious that they were not warned of the risks of giving their pets Rimadyl.

After Montana’s owner contacted Pfizer and the Food and Drug Administration to complain about the early and untimely death of her dog, Pfizer offered to pay her $440 in what they called “a gesture of good will.”

Today we can be thankful that Montana’s owner was insulted by Pfizer’s offer and their lawyers’ stipulation that she tell no one about the payment (or bribe as some would call it).

She refused to sign any of Pfizer’s proffered documents and would not accept any money. She felt it was an affront both to her and to the memory of Montana to absolve Pfizer of any blame.

As additional reports of serious reactions and the deaths of many dogs started pouring into the FDA, the agency recommended that Pfizer list “death” as a possible side effect in a warning letter to veterinarians and also place a warning on the drug labels.

Pfizer indicated this “would be devastating to the product” and after much stalling, eventually was forced to put the word “death” on Rimadyl’s labels and notify all veterinarians in writing.

The strongest blow to Pfizer’s inappropriate labeling and advertising was the FDA’s requirement that they mention the same warning on their television ads. When given an ultimatum about their commercials mentioning “death” or else pulling the ads, Pfizer chose to stop all television ads for Rimadyl.

Although this came too late to save the life of Montana, he and his owner should be credited with bringing pressure to bear on the FDA and Pfizer and forcing them to begin warning of the possible serious side effects of Rimadyl.

Since the introduction of Rimadyl in 1997, the FDA has received reports of more than 1,000 dogs that died or had to be put to sleep, and 7,000 more that had serious adverse reactions after taking the drug.

Despite these serious side effects, the FDA has not ordered the removal of Rimadyl from the marketplace. The FDA requires safety and efficacy testing for animal drugs just as it does for human drugs. However, animal drug tests are conducted with a much smaller number of test subjects. Pfizer used about 500 dogs in their trials of Rimadyl, which is less than one fifth the number of subjects used in most human-drug trials.

During Pfizer’s Rimadyl trials, some dogs developed unusual liver-function readings and one young beagle tested on a high dose of the drug died.

Neither the FDA or Pfizer found these effects alarming, and the drug was subsequently approved. A consumer group has mounted a campaign against Pfizer called BARKS, which stands for “Be Aware of Rimadyl’s Known Side-effects.”

Hopefully this organization will be able to influence more dog owners to carefully consider very seriously whether or not to have Rimadyl prescribed for their pet dog.

Since 1990, Winston’s Joint System and Winston’s Pain Formula have helped heal over twenty thousand dogs from all over the world. Our staff specializes in hip dysplasia, arthritis and all joint, pain and mobility issues.

There is an excellent chance we can help your dog, so please contact us or call our toll free number at 888-901-5557.

Dogs With OCD

Dogs with OCD (or Osteochondrosis) suffer a great deal of pain and mobility issues.

When a dog has OCD, fragments of bone and cartilage become detached from larger bones and end up floating around the area encompassing a dog’s joints. The result is that any movement in the joint where those fragments are located will cause a dog to suffer from severe pain.

What is Osteochondrosis (OCD)

OCD is a congenital problem that usually affects only larger dogs who seem to be predisposed to the condition.

The best way to understand the true cause of this condition is that it is a disease of the cartilage that results in large pieces of cartilage and bone becoming detached and floating freely. This causes a dog with OCD a lot of pain.

These free floating bone and cartilage pieces can lead to the development of arthritis, hip dysplasia, secondary degenerative joint disease, or other side effects.

There are several variations of osteochondrosis (OCD), and all typically affect the dog’s joints at the ankle, shoulder, elbow and knee on one or both sides of a dog’s body.

The different types of OCD are distinguished by their location on a dog’s body. They are also differentiated from each other based on the severity and the primary cause of the condition.

It’s more common for OCD to affect the forelimbs than a dog’s hind feet and legs.

Symptoms of OCD in dogs

To properly treat and identify OCD in your pet, you need to be able to recognize the symptoms of this disease. OCD can develop at any stage of a dog’s life, although it is more common in younger dogs than in older ones.

Dogs with OCD will show some of the following warning signs:

  • Pain when the affected limb is touched;
  • Muscle degeneration on the affected side of the dog’s body;
  • A general limitation of movement;
  • Lameness or difficulty moving around.

How to diagnose and treat OCD in dogs

A veterinarian will diagnose osteochondrosis using a series of X-ray tests.

Treatment of the disease requires lifestyle changes. The dog’s exercise routine must be changed to ensure that the dog can remain active and suffer fewer mobility problems.

Dogs suffering with joint diseases like OCD, arthritis, bursitis, hip dysplasia and other degenerative problems with the shoulders, elbows and hocks can find immediate and long-term relief without drugs with a regular regimen of Winston’s Joint System, a combination of three, totally-natural whole food supplements developed by a Naturopathic Doctor for his own dog. Winston’s contains no drugs and there are no side-effects.

Winston’s Pain Formula is another product proven to be fast acting and highly effective in relieving the pain in a dog caused by these diseases. Both of these products help your dog recover much faster.

Dogs with OCD will require a change in diet and careful observation to prevent overfeeding and weight gain which contribute to damage of the joints due to OCD. Work with your vet to determine if your dog’s diet is properly supporting its joint health or if it can be changed to be more effective.

Since 1990, Winston’s Joint System and Winston’s Pain Formula have helped heal over twenty thousand dogs from all over the world. Our staff specializes in hip dysplasia, arthritis and all joint, pain and mobility issues.

There is an excellent chance we can help your dog, so please contact us at: www.dogshealth.com or call our toll free number at 888-901-5557.

Hip Dysplasia in Doberman Pinschers

Canine hip dysplasia in Doberman Pinschers is a serious health problem affecting all ages of Dobermans.

Doberman Pinschers

Doberman Pinschers are considered by their owners to be reliable family pets. Dobermans were first bred in Germany to serve as guard dogs. Once known to be a very aggressive breed, the Doberman’s temperament has improved through breeding over the years and is now considered a generally non-aggressive dog.

The Doberman’s powerful, muscular build gives it speed, elegance, strength, and endurance. Its posture is alert and proud, and its gait is fast. Dobermans come in a color range of black, blue, fawn, red, and a light yellowish brown. Above each eye are rust-colored markings which also appear on the muzzle, throat and chest, below the tail, and on all four legs and feet. The Doberman has a smooth, short coat with neat lines and a white patch on its chest.

Dobermans are adventurous and loyal companions. They make talented and obedient students when they are being trained. They are usually sensitive and responsive to an owner’s commands, but they can also be dominating and overbearing. The breed is usually shy with strangers, but become aggressive with strange dogs. Owners who choose a Doberman usually do so for their alertness and ability to protect their owners from possible harm.

Dobermans require mental and physical exercise daily or they can become destructive or frustrated. A walk on a leash, a run in an enclosed area, or a long jog generally satisfies their need for activity. Dobermans are most useful indoors as a guardian and a family companion. Their coats require minimal care which means you don’t have to worry about shedding hair all over the house and the furniture.

The history of Doberman Pinschers is very interesting. A German tax collector named Louis Dobermann is credited for the breeding the first Doberman Pinscher. He was searching for an attentive guard dog to accompany him on his rounds, and in the late 19th century he began to experiment by crossing the German shorthaired shepherd and the German Pinscher.

The original Dobermans had round heads and heavy-boned bodies, but breeders soon began to develop a more robust-looking dog. Over time, the breed evolved and by 1899, the National Dobermann Pinscher Club was created in Germany.

The first Doberman Pinscher was brought to the United States in 1908. Utilized as a guard dog, police dog and a war dog, the Doberman’s qualities made it a favorite as a family bodyguard. In 1977, the Doberman became the second most popular breed in the United States. Since then, the breed has kept its well-regarded status as both a guard dog and a family pet.

Doberman Pinschers have a lifespan of 10 to 12 years.

Wobbler’s syndrome, cervical vertebral instability (CVI), and cardiomyopathy are some serious health problems affecting Dobermans, as well as canine hip dysplasia.

Hip dysplasia in Doberman Pinschers

Symptoms of hip dysplasia in Doberman Pinschers include moving more slowly, difficulty in getting up or lying down, reluctance to walk, jump or play, refusing to use stairs or get into the car, muscle atrophy, limping, yelping when touched, changes in appetite, and personality changes.

Dobermans who develop hip dysplasia, arthritis or osteochondrosis (OCD), suffer from pain and stiffness in their joints, and their ability to live a quality life and remain active is greatly diminished.

Treatment & Prevention

When a Doberman is diagnosed with hip dysplasia and the choices for treatment seem limited to expensive surgery or questionable drugs, we recommend you begin treating your dog with Winston’s Joint System, an all-natural formula developed by a Naturopathic Doctor to heal his own beloved dog. This proven formula has been giving relief from pain and stiffness to all breeds and ages of dogs for more than 20 years.

Because hip dysplasia is primarily an inherited condition in Dobermans, there are no products that can prevent its development, however, you can slow, and sometimes halt, the progression of the disease.

There are different assumptions on how to prevent the progression of hip dysplasia in Doberman Pinschers. Poor nutrition, inadequate or improper exercise, and increased body weight may all contribute to the severity of osteoarthritis after the hip dysplasia has developed.

By watching the calories your puppy or young dog consumes and preventing obesity in your dog, allowing only non-stressful types of exercise, and a daily regimen of Winston’s Joint System, are the best things you can do for your dog.

Since 1990, Winston’s Joint System and Winston’s Pain Formula have helped heal over twenty thousand dogs from all over the world. Our staff specializes in hip dysplasia, arthritis and all joint, pain and mobility issues.

There is an excellent chance we can help your dog, so please contact us at: www.dogshealth.com or call our toll free number at 888-901-5557.

What Can I Do About Hip Dysplasia In My Dog?

Hip dysplasia in dogs is a genetic disorder that is not preventable if you own a dog predisposed to the disease. However, there are several things you can do, such as proper nutrition and exercise, that will reduce the early onset and intensity of hip dysplasia in your dog.

Hip dysplasia is a genetic disorder occurring more often in certain breeds. It is caused by a partial dislocation of bones in the dog’s hip joints, leaving them misaligned but still in contact with each other, which causes erosion of the tissues that keep the joint moving smoothly.

What can you do about hip dysplasia if your dog is predisposed to the disease?

Proper Breeding

Some breeders are irresponsible and will breed a dog knowing it is susceptible to hip dysplasia, or will breed a dog too young to be properly tested, and the result is an increased occurrence of the disease. Every breeder who breeds dogs genetically prone to hip dysplasia should have their dogs checked before breeding.

If you intend to purchase a dog from a breeder, research the genetic diseases of the breed you want and ask the breeder if they test for those diseases. If they can’t (or won’t) give you a health certificate from a licensed veterinarian, you will be much better off looking elsewhere. You will end up saving yourself a lot of money and heartbreak in the future if you’re careful in selecting your new canine companion.

Proper Nutrition

A study done on Labrador retrievers showed that obesity increases the onset of hip dysplasia. Overweight adolescent dogs are more likely to suffer from hip dysplasia as are dogs that don’t receive sufficient amounts of calcium and other nutrients during their adolescent stage.

When your dog is young, feed it a high-quality diet. Don’t buy pet foods that have cheap fillers like corn and wheat or ones that contain meat byproducts, all of which have very little nutritional value. Choose foods for your young dog that have high-quality proteins listed as the first three ingredients and that don’t have preservatives added.

Proper Exercise

Exercise and mental stimulation are an important part of development of puppies but over-exercising at a young age can prevent the proper growth of bones, muscles and joints, leading to joint problems like as hip dysplasia and arthritis.

Running and swimming are excellent ways to exercise a young dog, but avoid activities that involve a lot of jumping, like Frisbee, until your puppy is a few years old.

One of the least expensive things you can do to ease hip dysplasia in a dog, you might want to use a ramp for getting in and out of your car or off of high furniture until it reaches 18 to 24 months of age.

Supplements

If your dog already suffers from hip dysplasia or arthritis, a safe and proven supplement for treating your pet is Winston’s Joint System, a combination of three, totally-natural whole food supplements developed by a Naturopathic Doctor for his own dog. It contains no drugs and there are no side-effects because it’s just good whole food. And there are no dosage problems because your dog’s body uses only what it needs.

Winston’s provides many of the raw materials essential for the synthesis of the joint-lubricating synovial fluid as well as the repair of articular cartilage and connective tissue. It also includes a natural anti-inflammatory compound, long used to relieve the pain of arthritis.

Hip dysplasia is a genetic disease that often can’t be prevented; but that doesn’t mean there is nothing you can do about hip dysplasia in your dog. By selecting a dog from a responsible, professional breeder, feeding your puppy and adult dog a healthy diet, and reducing high-impact exercise, occurrences of the disease can be reduced. Hip dysplasia is a progressively degenerative disease, so any amount of help you can give your dog, like treating him or her with Winston’s Joint System, will improve the quality of your dog’s life for years.

Since 1990, Winston’s Joint System and Winston’s Pain Formula have helped heal over twenty thousand dogs from all over the world. Our staff specializes in hip dysplasia, arthritis and all joint, pain and mobility issues.

There is an excellent chance we can help your dog, so please contact us at: www.dogshealth.com or call our toll free number at 888-901-5557.

Hip Dysplasia in Pit Bulls

Canine hip dysplasia is a common orthopedic problem in Pit Bulls. The disease is caused by a loose hipbone to thighbone connection leading to hind joint pain and lameness ranging from mild to severely crippling.

What causes it?Hip dysplasia is genetically transmitted but because multiple genes are involved, scientists have not been able to determine the pattern of inheritance.

Adding to the problem of causation is the complicated interplay between heredity and the environment. Environmental factors can have an influence on whether or not a particular dog or breed of dog will eventually develop hip dysplasia. Scientists who study canines still do not understand the interaction of heredity and environmental factors.

Hip dysplasia in Pit Bulls?

Although the disease disproportionately affects larger breed dogs, veterinarians have documented hip dysplasia in Pit Bulls and just about every other type of dog, including mixed breeds.

There are some preventive measures that can be taken to reduce the odds of a dog developing hip dysplasia. Early detection and treatment can help a dog live a long and relatively comfortable life.

Remember the adage “The hipbone’s connected to the thighbone?”. Try to picture a dog’s hip joint as a ball fitting into a socket. The ball is the top of the thighbone which is coated with a smooth surface of cartilage. The femoral head fits into the hip’s socket and the entire ball-and-socket joint is surrounded and supported by muscles, ligaments, and lubricating synovial fluid.

During the growth spurt from birth to 60 days, the muscles and connective tissue of a puppy prone to hip dysplasia – unlike a normal puppy – cannot keep the same growth pace as the faster growing bones. The resulting looseness of the joint causes abnormal wear on the cartilage that lines the femoral head. As the cartilage deteriorates, hip dysplasia or arthritis often sets in, sometimes both simultaneously. Arthritis is basically an abortive attempt by the body to stabilize the joint by adding bone.

Symptoms

Although pain and restricted range of motion are symptoms of hip dysplasia, other signs may depend on the age of the dog and the degree of arthritis present.

Young dysplastic dogs often move both back legs simultaneously in a “bunny hop” gait. On the other hand, some younger dogs whose X-rays show evidence of hip dysplasia are able to maintain normal mobility and will show signs of hip dysplasia only after they grow older and develop arthritis.

Symptoms of hip dysplasia include moving more slowly, difficulty in getting up or lying down, reluctance to walk, jump or play, refusing to use stairs or get into the car, muscle atrophy, limping, yelping when touched, changes in appetite, and personality changes. Both older and younger dogs suffering from the disease feel the most discomfort in cold, damp weather.

Pit Bulls who develop hip dysplasia or arthritis suffer from pain and stiffness in their joints which greatly diminishes their ability to live a quality life and remain active.

Treatment

When a Pit Bull is diagnosed with hip dysplasia and the choices for treatment seem limited to expensive surgery or questionable drugs, I recommend you begin treating your dog with Winston’s Joint System, an all-natural formula developed by a Naturopathic Doctor to heal his own beloved dog. This proven formula has been giving relief from pain and stiffness to all breeds and ages of dogs for more than 20 years. There are no side-effects because it’s just good whole food and no dosage problems because the dog’s body uses only what it needs.

Winston’s provides many of the raw materials essential for the synthesis of the joint-lubricating synovial fluid, as well as the repair of articular cartilage and connective tissue. Within the first 30 days of treatment, dogs on Winston’s Joint System show noticeable and often remarkable improvement.

How to diagnose hip dysplasia in your Pit Bull

Although canine hip dysplasia (CHD) may remain unseen in some dogs, early detection is critical.

The first step to determining whether a Pit Bull has hip dysplasia is through a careful physical examination by a veterinarian who will observe the dog as it sits, stands, and walks. This is the first measure to check for characteristic signs of hip problems such as a side-to-side swinging gait, lameness, and arched back which is caused by shifting weight forward, or the presence of overdeveloped front-leg and shoulder muscles.

The veterinarian will move the dog’s hip joint to assess its range of motion and check for pain with the joint extended. The vet will also listen for the “click” of the hip popping out of joint and for any grating sound of bone on bone that indicates cartilage loss.

Caring for a Pit Bull with hip dysplasia

Weight loss and moderate exercise, can also help alleviate pain and inflammation in and around the joint. The heavier the dog, the greater the forces acting on the joints.

When choosing which activities are appropriate for a Pit Bull suffering from hip dysplasia, take into account the dog’s physical condition and pain threshold, and compromise between complete exercise restriction and unlimited physical activity. Complete restriction is inadvisable because it adds to a dog’s pain and stiffness. Determine an appropriate activity level and help the dog stick to it.

A dog’s stomach is not quite as robust as a human’s, so avoid long-term use of aspirin which can cause vomiting and internal bleeding. Mega-doses of vitamin C are also not effective at preventing or even helping hip dysplasia, and supplementing a dog’s diet with calcium can actually exacerbate the disease. Because of potential toxicity and side-effects, veterinarians rarely prescribe medications containing acetaminophen, ibuprofen, or corticosteroids for hip dysplasia.

Prevention

Although genes play a big role in the development of canine hip dysplasia, not everything about the disease is hereditary. Evidence suggests that even dogs genetically predisposed to the disease can escape its worst effects if breeders and owners control rapid growth and weight gain during puppy hood, thereby increasing the chance that muscles, connective tissues, and hip joint bones will develop at the same rate.

Studies show that puppies fed a high-calorie diet grow faster than their litter mates on a low-calorie diet. Research also shows that puppies with constant access to food have more hip-joint laxity at 30 weeks and a higher incidence of hip dysplasia at 2 years than their counterparts who eat 25 percent less food on a restricted feeding schedule. Feeding a puppy a controlled, balanced diet is probably the best way to manage its growth.

Although veterinary science is still searching for definitive answers about how canine hip dysplasia develops, a diagnosis of the disease in a dog is not the end of the world. Loving owners, working with their veterinarians, can usually help dogs with unstable hipbone-thighbone connections cope in relative comfort. And in the process, owners can enhance their relationship with their loving companion.

Since 1990, Winston’s Joint System and Winston’s Pain Formula have helped heal over twenty thousand dogs from all over the world. Our staff specializes in hip dysplasia, arthritis and all joint, pain and mobility issues.

There is an excellent chance we can help your dog, so please contact us at: www.dogshealth.com or call our toll free number at 888-901-5557.

Hip Dysplasia in Bulldogs

Bulldogs are dependable, loyal and obedient. They have remarkable patience and tolerance and get along very well with other dogs and young children. One would assume that a breed of dog with such short legs would never be susceptible to hip dysplasia or arthritis. The truth is that hip dysplasia in Bulldogs is one of the most common health issues this breed is prone to.

Bulldogs

Bulldogs were bred in England for hundreds of years and were originally used in the 17th century for bull baiting –a gambling sport in which dogs fought bulls in a ring.

When bull baiting was outlawed in 1835, Bulldog breeders began to breed dogs that were kinder, heavier, and more relaxed, making them more popular as pets.

Wrinkled faces, fierce and tough looking, friendly and loving, easy to train, mellow and easygoing, courageous and sturdy. This is the description of a Bulldog, the ultimate buddy and an affectionate companion to a single person or a family. Bulldogs may look tough as nails, but they make sweet and gentle pets.

Apartment dwellers and couch potatoes might find Bulldogs the perfect pet: They don’t need too much space and are well-suited to living in apartments.

A pet Bulldog will hang out on the couch with you and watch hours of football or movie marathons. What you watch is of no concern to them, they simply want to be as close to you as possible and are very patient if you’re a rabid channel surfer.

But be advised, they can be very persistent when trying to get your attention, and if you ignore their hints to play and cuddle, they will pester you until they get what they want. They also tend to snore and snort so you’ll need to get used to their rude noises.

They are experts at forming close attachments with their owner or owners and sometimes this bond grows so strong, they’ll stay inside the house until you insist they go out to take care of their biological functions.

Bulldogs are not a good choice for a guard dog though. They can easily intimidate strangers just by their appearance and steady gaze, but they’re just as likely to cozy up and lick the hand of a stranger who acts friendly towards them.

Bulldogs like to chew on things. If you don’t want your furniture and personal things chewed to shreds, be sure to have plenty of ruggedly constructed doggie toys so they don’t start chewing your personal belongings.

Bulldogs are short, sturdy and stocky. With their wrinkled face and stocky builds, they look tough and intimidating.

They have wide heads with cheeks that draw back behind the eyes, thick folds of skin on the forehead, short muzzles, broad black noses, hanging upper lips, wide-set eyes, and small ears that fold back. Their short, sturdy limbs make them look like they are waddling when they walk. Their smooth coats come in a wide range of colors.

Healthy Bulldogs can live as long as 10 years, but they have a long list of hereditary health issues. Some Bulldogs suffer respiratory problems, eyesight problems, and hip dysplasia.

“Statistics from the Orthopedic Foundation for Animals indicate that of the 467 Bulldogs tested between 1979 and 2009 (30 years), 73.9% were affected by hip dysplasia, the highest amongst all breeds.”
– Source: Wikipedia

Hip dysplasia in Bulldogs

Hip dysplasia is a genetic disease that primarily affects large and giant breeds of dogs but can also affect medium-sized breeds and occasionally small breeds. It is primarily a disease of purebreds, although it can also occur in mixed breeds.

To understand hip dysplasia in Bulldogs and the resulting arthritis, you need a basic understanding of how the dog’s hip joint is affected.

The hip joint is comprised of a ball and socket that forms the attachment of the hind leg to the body. The ball portion is the head of the femur and the socket is located on the pelvis.

In a normal hip joint the ball rotates freely within the socket. The bones are shaped to perfectly match each other with the socket surrounding the ball. To strengthen the joint, the two bones are held together by a strong ligament.

The joint capsule, a strong band of connective tissue, circles the two bones to provide added stability.

This is an example of a healthy hip joint:

Hip dysplasia is linked to abnormal joint structure and a laxity of the muscles, connective tissue, and ligaments that would normally support the dog’s hip joints.

As the disease progresses, the articular surfaces of the two bones lose contact with each other. This separation of the two bones within the joint causes a drastic change in the size and shape of the articular surfaces.

This is an example of the hip joint of a Bulldog with hip dysplasia:

Most Bulldogs who eventually develop hip dysplasia are born with normal hips, but due to their genetic make-up the soft tissues surrounding the joint develop abnormally. This leads to the symptoms associated with hip dysplasia. The disease may affect both hips, or only the right or left hip.

The symptoms of hip dysplasia in Bulldogs cause afflicted dogs to walk or run with an altered gait, similar to a bunny-hop.
They begin to resist any movement that requires full extension or flexion of the rear legs. They will experience stiffness and pain in their rear legs after exercising and on first rising in the morning. Climbing stairs becomes difficult if not impossible. Some dogs will limp and are less willing to participate in normal daily activities, including walks they formerly enjoyed.

Prevention

It appears that the amount of calories a dog consumes, especially during its fast-growth period from three to ten months, has the biggest impact on whether or not a dog genetically prone to hip dysplasia will develop the disease.

Obesity can increase the severity of the disease in dogs that are genetically susceptible and the extra weight will intensify the degeneration of a dog’s joints and hips. Dogs who are genetically prone to hip dysplasia and also are overweight, are at a much higher risk of developing hip dysplasia and eventually osteoarthritis.

Exercise can be another risk factor. Dogs genetically susceptible to hip dysplasia may have an increased incidence of the disease if they are over-exercised at a young age. Moderate exercise like running and swimming is best for exercising young dogs.

Because hip dysplasia in Bulldogs is primarily an inherited condition, there are no products that can prevent its development.

Through proper diet and exercise, you can slow, and sometimes halt, the progression of these degenerative joint diseases while providing your dog with relief from its pain.

There are different assumptions on how to prevent the progression of hip dysplasia in Bulldogs.

Poor nutrition, inadequate or improper exercise, and increased body weight may all contribute to the severity of osteoarthritis after the hip dysplasia has developed.

Watching the calories your puppy or young dog consumes and preventing obesity in your dog, allowing only non-stressful types of exercise, and a daily regimen of Winston’s Joint System, are the best things you can do for your dog.

Since 1990, Winston’s Joint System and Winston’s Pain Formula have helped heal over twenty thousand dogs from all over the world. Our staff specializes in hip dysplasia, arthritis and all joint, pain and mobility issues.

There is an excellent chance we can help your dog, so please contact us at: www.dogshealth.com or call our toll free number at 888-901-5557.

History of Rimadyl

The history of Rimadyl dates back to January of 1997 when Pfizer Pharmaceuticals first introduced the drug to veterinarians. The generic for Rimadyl, Carprofen, was marketed much later. Many dog owners whose pets suffer from arthritis or hip dysplasia believe that Rimadyl has improved the quality of their dogs’ lives. However, as a responsible dog owner, you need to be aware that there is sufficient evidence proving that Rimadyl can have very serious side effects for an animal.

Some dogs have died after being prescribed Rimadyl. Most of these cases have been attributed to the unexpected and swift onset of the well-known side effects of Rimadyl.

Labrador Retrievers, as well as their cousins, the Golden Retrievers, are more prone than most breeds to developing hip dysplasia, arthritis and other debilitating joint diseases. Pfizer first reported that Labradors were particularly at risk from Rimadyl’s toxicity. Pfizer’s report on side effects that occurred during the drug’s initial post-approval phase states, “. . . approximately one fourth of all hepatic reports were in Labrador Retrievers.”

This is an alarmingly high rate of incidence and if you are the owner of a Labrador who suffers from a debilitating joint disease and your vet has prescribed Rimadyl, you need to exercise extreme caution so you are not putting your dog’s health or its life at risk. Besides Labrador Retrievers, many breeds who have been prescribed Rimadyl have experienced side effects or death from Rimadyl.

Your veterinarian should pre-screen your dog before prescribing Rimadyl. Follow-up testing and close monitoring of the dog for possible toxic reactions is equally important.

Rimadyl or its generic Carprofen are not recommended for dogs who have bleeding disorders, liver disease, inflammatory bowel disease, or are inclined to suffer from gastrointestinal ulceration.

Rimadyl should never be given along with any other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) such as aspirin, or any corticosteroids such as prednisone, prednisolone, or dexamethasone. It is also not advisable to give the drug to pregnant or nursing female dogs because it has not been tested as being safe for the mother or the unborn puppies.

Before agreeing with your vet that Rimadyl is the best solution for your dog’s joint problems, discuss the benefits of the drug against the risks. It has been widely reported that many veterinarians are not completely informed about the serious side-effects of Rimadyl.

If you decide your dog might benefit from Rimadyl and you believe that it’s worth the risks involved, ask your veterinarian to start by prescribing the lowest possible dosage that can be used to obtain relief, and then increase the dosage if necessary. The recommended dosage is one mg per pound of a dog’s weight, given twice a day. It’s possible that your dog may obtain relief at a lower dosage which might possibly help in avoiding toxicity. Some vets recommend that Rimadyl be used only for a period of several weeks, followed by several weeks off the drug to give the dog’s liver time to recover from the toxic effects of the drug.

As soon as your dog begins taking Rimadyl you need to carefully watch for the following symptoms which are signs of potential life-threatening reactions to the drug:

• loss of appetite
• refusal to drink water or an increased thirst
• vomiting – occasionally with flecks of blood in the vomit
• diarrhea
• black, tarry stools
• lethargy or unusual drowsiness
• hyperactivity or constant restlessness
• sudden aggressiveness when none was evident before
• weakness or partial paralysis
• seizures or loss of balance

If any of these symptoms occur, IMMEDIATELY STOP giving your pet the drug and take it to the vet. The earlier you discover the problem, the better the chances your dog will have a complete recovery.

Is Rimadyl a “miracle drug” for dogs or are the potential side effects too dangerous? The history of Rimadyl has been plagued with several serious problems; (1) a lack of adequate warnings about the potential serious and deadly side effects of the drug, (2) the large and unacceptable number of veterinarians who are unaware of Rimadyl’s serious side effects, and (3) the severity and sometimes sudden onset of the side effects which can result in the death of the dog being given Rimadyl.

A safer and more effective treatment for arthritis and hip dysplasia is Winston’s Joint System, an all-natural formula developed by a Naturopathic Doctor to heal his own beloved dog. For over 20 years, this long-proven formula has been providing relief from the pain and stiffness of arthritis and hip dysplasia to all breeds and ages of dogs.

If your pet suffers from any of the following joint problems, you should place it on a daily regimen of Winston’s Joint System to give welcome relief from its pain:

* Hip Dysplasia
* Arthritis
* Osteochondritis (OCD)
* Stiffness/Inflammation
* Ligament Tears
* Growing Pains
* Mobility Problems
* Joint Pains

With the information presented here, and a consultation with your vet, you should be able to decide whether the risks of administering Rimadyl are worth the possible benefits. For myself, I’d rather be safe using Winston’s Joint System than be sorry and endanger my loving dog’s health or even worse, contribute to its death.

Hip Dysplasia in Akitas

Hip dysplasia in Akitas is a common health issue. As an Akita ages it’s important to watch for any symptoms of hip dysplasia or arthritis. An early diagnosis and treatment will do wonders for your loving pet.

The Akitas

Akitas have a reputation for being aggressive hunters in the wild, yet as home pets they are tame and gentle, adapting easily to a quiet family life.

That doesn’t necessarily mean they’ll cuddle up on the sofa and watch TV with you; their instinctive nature tends to keep them alert and responsive to any possible danger.

Who hasn’t loved Hachiko, the Akita from the 2009 movie “Hachi: A Dog’s Tale“? Akitas make loving, faithful, dependable companions and they get along very well with children.

They can be a little aloof with people they don’t know, but they eventually warm up to new people and situations. They don’t bark a lot which is good for apartment dwellers, but they’re very intelligent and responsive, making them first-rate guard dogs.

Think of them as tough, smart and loyal companions.

Akitas are made for outdoor sports whether it’s hiking, hunting, playing games, or jumping in rivers and lakes. They have weatherproof coats that keep them warm in cold temperatures.

An Akita needs ample daily exercise to maintain its physical health and sharp mind. Akitas who live in urban dwellings need a vigorous walk or jog every day, while those who live in a rural setting will do well with daily runs around the property.

In addition to their boundless physical strength, Akitas also have dominant personalities and need an owner who can devote the time and patience to train them properly.

Akitas have large, sturdy frames covered in thick, water-resistant coats that shed a lot in the spring and fall. Daily brushing becomes a must.

They have broad heads with short muzzles, black noses and pointed ears that face forward. Their triangular eyes are dark and deeply set. Their bodies are slightly longer than they are tall, and their thick coats come in black, gray, tan, and brown, all with white markings.

A healthy Akita can live as long as 12 years. Common health issues include immune deficiencies, eye problems, thyroid problems, and hip dysplasia.

Hip dysplasia in Akitas

Hip dysplasia is a genetic disease that primarily affects large and giant breeds of dogs but can also affect medium-sized breeds and occasionally small breeds. It is primarily a disease of purebreds, although it can also occur in mixed breeds.

To understand hip dysplasia in Akitas and the resulting arthritis, you need a basic understanding of how the dog’s hip joint is affected.

The hip joint is comprised of a ball and socket that forms the attachment of the hind leg to the body. The ball portion is the head of the femur and the socket is located on the pelvis.

In a normal hip joint the ball rotates freely within the socket. The bones are shaped to perfectly match each other with the socket surrounding the ball.

To strengthen the joint, the two bones are held together by a strong ligament. The joint capsule, a strong band of connective tissue, circles the two bones to provide added stability.

A normal hip joint:

Hip dysplasia is linked to abnormal joint structure and a laxity of the muscles, connective tissue, and ligaments that would normally support the dog’s hip joints.

As the disease progresses, the articular surfaces of the two bones lose contact with each other. This separation of the two bones within the joint causes a drastic change in the size and shape of the articular surfaces.

An abnormal hip joint:

Most Akitas who eventually develop hip dysplasia are born with normal hips, but due to their genetic make-up the soft tissues surrounding the joint develop abnormally. This leads to the symptoms associated with hip dysplasia. The disease may affect both hips, or only the right or left hip.

The symptoms of hip dysplasia cause afflicted dogs to walk or run with an altered gait, similar to a bunny-hop.

They begin to resist any movement that requires full extension or flexion of the rear legs. They will experience stiffness and pain in their rear legs after exercising and on first rising in the morning. Climbing stairs becomes difficult if not impossible. Some dogs will limp and are less willing to participate in normal daily activities, including walks they formerly enjoyed.

It appears that the amount of calories a dog consumes, especially during its fast-growth period from three to ten months, has the biggest impact on whether or not a dog genetically prone to hip dysplasia will develop the disease.

Obesity can increase the severity of the disease in dogs that are genetically susceptible and the extra weight will intensify the degeneration of a dog’s joints and hips. Dogs who are genetically prone to hip dysplasia and also are overweight, are at a much higher risk of developing hip dysplasia and eventually osteoarthritis.

Exercise can be another risk factor. Dogs genetically susceptible to hip dysplasia may have an increased incidence of the disease if they are over-exercised at a young age. Moderate exercise like running and swimming is best for exercising young dogs.

Prevention

Because hip dysplasia in Akitas is primarily an inherited condition, there are no products that can prevent its development.

Through proper diet, exercise, and a daily regimen of Winston’s Joint System, you can slow, and sometimes halt, the progression of these degenerative joint diseases while providing your dog with relief from its pain. Winston’s provides many of the raw materials essential for the synthesis of the joint-lubricating synovial fluid as well as the repair of articular cartilage and connective tissue.

There are different assumptions on how to prevent the progression of hip dysplasia.

Poor nutrition, inadequate or improper exercise, and increased body weight may all contribute to the severity of osteoarthritis after the hip dysplasia has developed.

Watching the calories your puppy or young dog consumes and preventing obesity in your dog, allowing only non-stressful types of exercise, and a daily regimen of Winston’s Joint System, are the best things you can do for your dog.

Since 1990, Winston’s Joint System and Winston’s Pain Formula have helped heal over twenty thousand dogs from all over the world. Our staff specializes in hip dysplasia, arthritis and all joint, pain and mobility issues.

There is an excellent chance we can help your dog, so please contact us at: www.dogshealth.com or call our toll free number at 888-901-5557.

Hip Dysplasia in English Springer Spaniels

English Springer Spaniels are a marvelous combination of sturdiness and composure. They are charming dogs that feel right at home at family events, picnics or even dinner parties.

Most people wouldn’t associate English Springer Spaniels and hip dysplasia because it just doesn’t seem to be a major problem with this breed. But statistics prove that these beautiful animals are indeed susceptible to hip dysplasia.

English Springer Spaniels

For hundreds of years English Springer Spaniels have been prized for their ability to switch from “hunting mode” to “family mode” after long days spent in the wilds hunting.

Springers love everybody they meet. They easily adapt to playing with children, and are also comfortable around other pets – cats and dogs included. They make wonderful playmates for children and are eager to fraternize with strangers. That does not mean they will lick the hand of every stranger that appears at your door. They have great protective instincts and will unquestionably sound the alarm if they sense a threat of any kind.

English Springer Spaniels are people-oriented dogs. They need lots of attention, companionship and positive feedback to feel relaxed and balanced. They can get bored if left alone for too long a period and they’ll dig up your garden, chew up your shoes, or bark incessantly.

They can easily adapt to living in an apartment or small condominium. However, they do need plenty of outdoor exercise, and love to hop into a pool or pond for a short swim.

They are reasonably easy to groom, but shed hair all year long. Their coats are medium-length and regular brushing keeps them looking good.

English Springer Spaniels tend to put on weight easily so it’s important that they’re not overfed. Springer Spaniels who are overweight are more prone to developing hip dysplasia. Be sure to take your dog on daily walks regardless of the weather.

Springer Spaniels date back to the 1600’s and have long been prized for their ability to help hunters by driving birds from bushes, trees and fields. They continue to be valued for their agility, hunting skills, obedience, and companionship.

English Springer Spaniels are medium-sized dogs with compact bodies and medium-length coats that grow feathery on their long ears, legs, chest and belly. Their heads are strong and their faces have a chiseled shape, giving them a stately, alert look. Their eyes are medium-sized, oval-shaped and slightly sunken, exuding a cheerful and loving expression. They have long necks that slope down to deep, developed chests. Their tails are usually docked, and their flat or wavy coats come in black and white, liver and white, blue roan or liver roan.

A healthy Springer can live as long as 14 years. Common health issues include epilepsy, eye problems, and hip dysplasia.

Hip dysplasia in English Springer Spaniels

Hip dysplasia is a genetic disease that primarily affects large and giant breeds of dogs but can also affect medium-sized breeds and occasionally small breeds. It is primarily a disease of purebreds, although it can also occur in mixed breeds.

To understand hip dysplasia and the resulting arthritis, you need a basic understanding of how the dog’s hip joint is affected.

The hip joint is comprised of a ball and socket that forms the attachment of the hind leg to the body. The ball portion is the head of the femur and the socket is located on the pelvis. In a normal hip joint the ball rotates freely within the socket.

The bones are shaped to perfectly match each other with the socket surrounding the ball. To strengthen the joint, the two bones are held together by a strong ligament. The joint capsule, a strong band of connective tissue, circles the two bones to provide added stability.

X-ray of a normal hip joint:

Hip dysplasia is linked to abnormal joint structure and a laxity of the muscles, connective tissue, and ligaments that would normally support the dog’s hip joints. As the disease progresses, the articular surfaces of the two bones lose contact with each other. This separation of the two bones within the joint causes a drastic change in the size and shape of the articular surfaces.

X-Ray of an abnormal hip joint:

Most dogs who eventually develop hip dysplasia are born with normal hips, but due to their genetic make-up the soft tissues surrounding the joint develop abnormally. This leads to the symptoms associated with hip dysplasia. The disease may affect both hips, or only the right or left hip.

The symptoms of hip dysplasia cause afflicted dogs to walk or run with an altered gait, similar to a bunny-hop. They begin to resist any movement that requires full extension or flexion of the rear legs. They will experience stiffness and pain in their rear legs after exercising and on first rising in the morning. Climbing stairs becomes difficult if not impossible. Some dogs will limp and are less willing to participate in normal daily activities, including walks they formerly enjoyed.

It appears that the amount of calories a dog consumes, especially during its fast-growth period from three to ten months, has the biggest impact on whether or not a dog genetically prone to hip dysplasia will develop the disease.

Obesity can increase the severity of hip dysplasia in English Springer Spaniels that are genetically susceptible to the disease and the extra weight will intensify the degeneration of it’s joints and hips. Dogs who are genetically prone to hip dysplasia and also are overweight, are at a much higher risk of developing hip dysplasia and eventually osteoarthritis.

Exercise can be another risk factor. Dogs genetically susceptible to hip dysplasia may have an increased incidence of the disease if they are over-exercised at a young age. Moderate exercise like running and swimming is best for exercising young dogs.

Prevention

Because hip dysplasia is primarily an inherited condition, there are no products that can prevent its development.

Through proper diet, exercise, and a daily regimen of Winston’s Joint System, you can slow, and sometimes halt, the progression of these degenerative joint diseases while providing your dog with relief from its pain. Winston’s provides many of the raw materials essential for the synthesis of the joint-lubricating synovial fluid as well as the repair of articular cartilage and connective tissue.

If you’re looking to adopt a dog, the best way to lessen the possibility of getting an English Springer Spaniel that will develop hip dysplasia is to examine the incidence of the disease in the dog’s lineage. If at all possible, try to examine the parents and grandparents as far back as three or four generations.

There are different assumptions on how to prevent the progression of hip dysplasia. Poor nutrition, inadequate or improper exercise, and increased body weight may all contribute to the severity of osteoarthritis after the hip dysplasia has developed.

Watching the calories your puppy or young dog consumes and preventing obesity in your dog, allowing only non-stressful types of exercise, and a daily regimen of Winston’s Joint System, are the best things you can do for your dog.

Since 1990, Winston’s Joint System and Winston’s Pain Formula have helped heal over twenty thousand dogs from all over the world. Our staff specializes in hip dysplasia, arthritis and all joint, pain and mobility issues.

There is an excellent chance we can help your dog, so please contact us at: www.dogshealth.com or call our toll free number at 888-901-5557.

Arthritis in Older Dogs

Just like humans, older dogs are susceptible to many diseases, arthritis and hip dysplasia being two of the most common ailments. If your dog is affected by arthritis, there are some things you’ll need to do to make sure it’s comfortable at all times and has the ability – and mobility – to enjoy its “golden years.”

Arthritis is a problem affecting a dog’s joints and is caused by a natural reduction in glucosamine which is essential for healthy bones.

A dog’s joints become swollen and painful, making it difficult to move about.

Most dogs with arthritis will suffer from pain when attempting certain activities like walking or climbing stairs.

Remedies & treatment for arthritis in older dogs

Dogs with arthritis also require a special diet containing additional vitamins and minerals.

The diet for a dog with arthritis needs to be easily digestible and should contain fewer proteins. Carbohydrates should be eliminated from the dog’s diet as much as possible.

If the dog is obese, a weight loss diet is absolutely necessary because the extra weight can cause additional pain in the dog’s joints. Senior dogs are the most apt to suffer from arthritis and a vet may recommend a wet food diet for an older dog.

Arthritis in older dogs will require administering supplements that help with joint support and make the dog more comfortable. Winston’s Joint System is an all-natural formula developed by a Naturopathic Doctor to heal his own beloved dog. For over 20 years, this proven formula has been helping dogs find relief from the pain and stiffness caused by arthritis and hip dysplasia.

Dogs suffering from either of these debilitating diseases also need extra vitamins and minerals too. The dog will also benefit from a pain relieving supplement like Winston’s Pain Formula, It’s fast acting and highly effective and works exceptionally well with Winston’s Joint System to give comfort to an ailing dog.

Arthritis in older dogs can be more debilitating than it is for younger dogs. Younger dogs are usually able to handle the pain of arthritis a little easier and they may limp or slow down their movements, whereas an older, senior dog is unable to do the same.

Since 1990, Winston’s Joint System and Winston’s Pain Formula have helped heal over twenty thousand dogs from all over the world. Our staff specializes in hip dysplasia, arthritis and all joint, pain and mobility issues.

There is an excellent chance we can help your dog, so please contact us at: www.dogshealth.com or call our toll free number at 888-901-5557.