Rimadyl For Arthritis in Dogs

What is Rimadyl? Rimadyl (generic name: carprofen), is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) used to treat the pain and inflammation of hip dysplasia and arthritis in dogs. Rimadyl provides 24-hour relief from these debilitating diseases by reducing a dog’s hormones that cause the pain and inflammation.

Rimadyl is available in three forms for easy administration of the drug: caplet, chewable or injection. Rimadyl chewable tablets taste like liver, which is tasty to most dogs, so the medication needs to be kept where the dog cannot gain access to it.

Cautions & overdose

Rimadyl overdose symptoms include nausea, vomiting, headache, drowsiness, stomach pain, seizures, or difficulty urinating.

Veterinarians prescribing Rimadyl warn that the drug should not be administered along with aspirin or any other NSAID. It also should not be used when a dog is taking steroids or corticosteroids like prednisone, prednisolone, or dexamethasone.

Rimadyl is not safe for a dog who has kidney or liver disease, or inflammatory bowel disease. A dog should be prescreened by a veterinarian for these diseases before the drug is prescribed.

A dog who is on Rimadyl for a prolonged time should also have its liver and kidney enzymes monitored on a regular basis.

Rimadyl Side-effects

There are side effects associated with Rimadyl. Some are common, and some are rare. Rimadyl has also been traced to the death of some dogs that have taken the medicine.

A dog owner whose pet is being given Rimadyl is advised to watch closely for any of the following symptoms:

  • loss of normal appetite
  • vomiting (sometime stained with blood)
  • diarrhea
  • black, tarry stool
  • unusual lethargy or drowsiness for extended times
  • hyperactivity
  • loss of balance, dizziness or weakness in legs
  • drastic or very unusual changes in eating habits
  • increased aggressive behavior
  • partial paralysis
  • seizures
  • jaundice

Any of these symptoms, especially several at the same time, can be an indication of a very serious problem. If these symptoms occur, stop administering Rimadyl and immediately contact your veterinarian.

Rimadyl Alternatives

If your dog is suffering from arthritis or hip dysplasia, there are safer alternatives to Rimadyl.

Supplements such as glucosamine and chondroitin will work for some dogs, some of the time.

A much more effective treatment for arthritis and hip dysplasia is Winston’s Joint System, an all-natural formula developed by a Naturopathic Doctor to heal his own beloved dog. For over 20 years, this long-proven formula has been providing relief from the pain and stiffness of arthritis and hip dysplasia to all breeds and ages of dogs.

If your pet suffers from any of the following joint problems, I recommend that you try Winston’s Joint System to give your dog welcome relief from its pain:

  • Hip Dysplasia
  • Arthritis
  • Osteochondritis (OCD)
  • Stiffness/Inflammation
  • Ligament Tears
  • Growing Pains
  • Mobility Problems
  • Joint Pains
  • Back/Spinal Problems
  • Hypertrophic Osteodystrophy (HOD)

Rimadyl for arthritis in dogs can be dangerous to an animal’s health. It is much safer for your pet to be placed on a daily regimen of Winston’s Joint System.

Within the first 30 days of treatment, dogs show noticeable and often remarkable improvement. And, unlike drugs such as Rimadyl, Winston’s is safe for any dog.

⇒ Read more about painkillers and the risks of giving Rimadyl for arthritis in dogs

 

Since 1990, Winston’s Joint System and Winston’s Pain Formula have helped heal over twenty thousand dogs from all over the world. Our staff specializes in hip dysplasia, arthritis and all joint, pain and mobility issues.

There is an excellent chance we can help your dog, so please contact us at: www.dogshealth.com or call our toll free number at 888-901-5557.

Arthritis in Older Dogs

Just like humans, older dogs are susceptible to many diseases, arthritis and hip dysplasia being two of the most common ailments. If your dog is affected by arthritis, there are some things you’ll need to do to make sure it’s comfortable at all times and has the ability – and mobility – to enjoy its “golden years.”

Arthritis is a problem affecting a dog’s joints and is caused by a natural reduction in glucosamine which is essential for healthy bones.

A dog’s joints become swollen and painful, making it difficult to move about.

Most dogs with arthritis will suffer from pain when attempting certain activities like walking or climbing stairs.

Remedies & treatment for arthritis in older dogs

Dogs with arthritis also require a special diet containing additional vitamins and minerals.

The diet for a dog with arthritis needs to be easily digestible and should contain fewer proteins. Carbohydrates should be eliminated from the dog’s diet as much as possible.

If the dog is obese, a weight loss diet is absolutely necessary because the extra weight can cause additional pain in the dog’s joints. Senior dogs are the most apt to suffer from arthritis and a vet may recommend a wet food diet for an older dog.

Arthritis in older dogs will require administering supplements that help with joint support and make the dog more comfortable. Winston’s Joint System is an all-natural formula developed by a Naturopathic Doctor to heal his own beloved dog. For over 20 years, this proven formula has been helping dogs find relief from the pain and stiffness caused by arthritis and hip dysplasia.

Dogs suffering from either of these debilitating diseases also need extra vitamins and minerals too. The dog will also benefit from a pain relieving supplement like Winston’s Pain Formula, It’s fast acting and highly effective and works exceptionally well with Winston’s Joint System to give comfort to an ailing dog.

Arthritis in older dogs can be more debilitating than it is for younger dogs. Younger dogs are usually able to handle the pain of arthritis a little easier and they may limp or slow down their movements, whereas an older, senior dog is unable to do the same.

Since 1990, Winston’s Joint System and Winston’s Pain Formula have helped heal over twenty thousand dogs from all over the world. Our staff specializes in hip dysplasia, arthritis and all joint, pain and mobility issues.

There is an excellent chance we can help your dog, so please contact us at: www.dogshealth.com or call our toll free number at 888-901-5557.

Arthritis, Dogs and Dinosaurs

Arthritis is one of the oldest diseases known to mankind. Surprisingly, science has shown that dinosaurs also had arthritis and there is evidence that early humans had the same chronic aches and pains. So it’s understandable that dogs can develop arthritis also. In fact, arthritis is a common disease affecting man’s best friend.

Did you know that managing your dog’s arthritis can help you better manage your own arthritis? Owning and being responsible for a pet dog can give you a positive outlook on life, improve your attitude and give a lift to your spirits. It is a fact that pet-owners tend to live longer and average fewer visits to their doctor’s office.

Arthritis affects dogs of all ages just as it affects people of all ages. If you notice changes in your dog’s mood and activity, and it doesn’t seem to be feeling too good, you may think it has a cold or stomach virus, but it could be arthritis. Arthritis affects one in every five adult dogs in the U.S. and is one of the most common sources of chronic pain that veterinarians treat.

The question then remains, how do you know if it’s arthritis? Your dog can’t tell you what’s wrong with it, so it’s important to watch for non-verbal cues and take even subtle changes seriously.

There are certain signs that your dog may have arthritis. You may notice it favoring one leg, experiencing difficulty sitting or standing, sleeping more, appearing to have stiff or sore joints, being hesitant to jump, run or climb stairs, gaining weight, being less interested in playing, demonstrating a decrease in normal activity, displaying changes in attitude or behavior, and being less alert.

If your dog displays any of these symptoms for more than two weeks, schedule an appointment with your veterinarian for an arthritis evaluation, which will involve a physical exam and X-rays. The best thing you can do for your dog to help manage arthritis is to get a diagnosis from the vet and start a treatment plan as soon as possible.

Recommended treatments may include the following:

(1) A healthy diet and exercise to help maintain proper weight

(2) Working with your veterinarian to find a drug treatment using nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS) which is the most common form of pharmaceutical treatment for arthritis in dogs

(3) Over-the-counter pet treatments, such as food containing either glucosamine and chondroitin sulfate or Omega fatty acids. These have been shown to offer some help in relieving the symptoms of arthritis in dogs

(4) A veterinarian-prescribed anti-inflammatory drugs and an over-the-counter treatment that together may help decrease pain and disease progression.

The most complete and effective treatment I have discovered for my own 8 year old Great Dane who has arthritis, is Winston’s Joint System, a combination of three, totally-natural whole food supplements developed by a Naturopathic Doctor for his own dog. With Winston’s there was no need for drugs, and my dog has never suffered from the common side-effects caused by the drugs because Winston’s is just good whole food. And I don’t have to be concerned about dosage problems either because my dog’s body uses only what it needs.

Within the first 30 days after I started treating my dog with Winston’s Joint System, he began to show significant improvement in his arthritis symptoms.

No matter how you choose to treat your dog’s arthritis, make sure you work with your veterinarian to ensure that you select the best program that helps your loving companion. Early diagnosis and treatment, maintaining a healthy weight, and regular exercise are critical in treating a dog with arthritis.

 

Diagnosis And Treatment Of Hip Dysplasia (Hip Dysplasia In Dogs – Part 2)

This is the second part of our 4-part series “Hip Dysplasia in Dogs”.

In this part we’ll focus on the diagnosis and treatment of hip dysplasia. How is the disease diagnosed? How to treat it? What options are there?

If you notice any signs of hip problems on your dog, it’s imperative to pay a visit to your vet for a complete examination as soon as possible.

Diagnosis of hip dysplasia

Hip dysplasia in dogs is normally diagnosed by a complete physical exam and X-rays of the hip joints.

Diagnosis And Treatment Of Hip Dysplasia

Your veterinarian will observe the dog as it moves, stands and sits to check for characteristic signs of hip problems.

If a dog has noticeable signs resembling hip dysplasia or arthritis, any changes in the dog’s hip joint will be apparent on an X-ray.

The vet will also check to see if there is looseness in the dog’s hip joints. The dog may also display pain when the vet extends and flexes its rear legs.

In order to get the best result from an X-ray and make certain that the dog’s muscles are relaxed, the vet may need to anesthetize the dog in order to take the best pictures of the dog’s hip joints.

After reviewing the X-rays, the veterinarian will compare the dog’s hip or hips to healthy dogs of the same breed and age.

When a dog is diagnosed with hip dysplasia using X-rays, the vet can determine whether the disease is in a mild, moderate, or severe stage.

Treatment of hip dysplasia

Treatment of hip dysplasia is both medical and surgical.

How is hip dysplasia treated surgically?

There are several surgical procedures available to treat hip dysplasia in dogs. The type of surgery will depend upon the age and size of the dog, and the severity of its hip joint degeneration.

• Young dogs under one year of age with severe hip problems but no apparent damage to the joints yet will be considered for a procedure called Triple Pelvic Osteotomy (TPO).

This procedure involves surgically breaking the dog’s pelvic bones and realigning the joint bones to restore the weight-bearing surface area. This surgical procedure is major and expensive, but has proven to be very successful on younger dogs.

It is not recommended for middle-aged and older dogs.

In a senior dog, the severity of the surgery can be enough to cause its death.

Total hip replacement may be the best surgical choice for a dog whose disease is a result of chronic hip dysplasia.

Total hip replacement can produce a functionally normal joint, stop further degeneration of the joints and help ease joint pain. The existing joint is removed and replaced with an artificial one.

If both hips need replacement only one hip will be operated on during surgery and the dog will require as long as three-months of rest to fully recuperate between the surgeries.

This is a very expensive surgery but it produces excellent results, allowing most dogs to return to an almost normal level of activity without pain.

Femoral head and neck excision is a procedure in which the head of the femur is surgically removed and an artificial joint replaces the hip.

This procedure is used in cases where there is serious degenerative joint disease and total hip replacement is not feasible or the expense of a total hip replacement is unaffordable.

The resulting artificial joint will usually be free from pain and will allow the dog to increase his activity but his full range of motion and joint stability will be decreased.

How is hip dysplasia treated medically?

Medical treatment includes restricting activity and giving a non-steroid anti-inflammatory (NSAIDS) analgesic such as Rimadyl.

There are many pros and cons about giving a dog Rimadyl for hip dysplasia and arthritis pain. As a responsible pet owner, it would be best to research this drug as thoroughly as you can before giving your dog this medication.

Painkillers like Rimadyl, or even aspirin, mask pain without addressing the deeper sources of what causes the pain. The biggest risk about giving your dog Rimadyl, is its serious side-effects. Numerous deaths have been attributed to its use.

Non-medical treatment of hip dysplasia

A much safer treatment, and one that many owners agree is more effective, is to put your dog on a daily regimen of Winston’s Joint System, an all-natural formula developed by a Naturopathic Doctor to heal his own beloved dog who suffered from hip dysplasia. Because of the high cost of corrective surgeries, non-medical treatment of hip dysplasia is often the only realistic option for pet owners.

Since 1990, Winston’s Joint System and Winston’s Pain Formula have helped heal over twenty thousand dogs from all over the world. Our staff specializes in hip dysplasia, arthritis and all joint, pain and mobility issues.

There is an excellent chance we can help your dog, so please contact us at: www.dogshealth.com or call our toll free number at 888-901-5557.

What Is Hip Dysplasia In Dogs – Causes & Symptoms (Hip Dysplasia In Dogs – Part 1)

This is the first part of our 4-part series “Hip Dysplasia in Dogs”.

In this part we’ll cover what hip dysplasia is, and what the causes and symptoms of hip dysplasia in dogs are.

Hip dysplasia is a disease that seriously affects the hip joint that attaches a dog’s hind leg to its body.

What Is Hip Dysplasia In Dogs - Causes & Symptoms

How the hip joint works

The hip joint is a ball-and-socket joint. The ball portion is the head of the femur (the main bone in the thigh) and the socket is located on the dog’s pelvis.

In a healthy, normal joint the ball rotates freely and easily within the socket. The dog’s bones are shaped to perfectly match each other, with the socket surrounding the ball. In order to strengthen the hip joint, a strong ligament holds the two bones together. This ligament attaches the femur head directly to the socket.

The joint capsule is a very strong band of connective tissue that circles the two bones and provides stability for a dog’s rear legs. In healthy dogs, the area where the bones actually touch each other is smooth and cushioned with a layer of spongy cartilage. The hip joint also contains a thick fluid that keeps the joint lubricated.

In a dog with normal hips, all of these components work together and help the joint function smoothly which supports the dog in maintaining stability.

What is hip dysplasia in dogs?

Hip dysplasia is a result of abnormal joint structure and a slackness of the muscles, the connective tissue, and the ligaments that support the joint.

As a dog’s hip joint continues to deteriorate, the surfaces of the two hip bones begin to separate in the joint and cause structural changes in the bone surfaces. As the cartilage is progressively worn away, the pain becomes intense when the dog stands or walks.

Most dogs are born with normal hips but if their genetic background includes a tendency for hip dysplasia or arthritis, the soft tissues that surround the hip joint will develop abnormally and cause hip dysplasia. The disease can affect both the right and left hips, but more often affects only one side.

Symptoms of hip dysplasia in dogs

Hip dysplasia symptoms are nearly identical to arthritis symptoms which causes a dog to walk or run in a limping or odd way.

A dog may avoid movement that requires fully extending or flexing its rear legs. They will also experience stiffness and pain in their rear legs after exercising or when they first get up in the morning.

Climbing stairs becomes a difficult if not impossible task.

As hip dysplasia progressively worsens, affected dogs will lose most of their muscle tone and may need assistance in getting up after resting in a prone position.

Signs of hip dysplasia in dogs:
If you notice any of the signs below, visit your veterinarian as soon as possible. An early diagnosis, is the key to a successful treatment.

  • Moving more slowly
  • Difficulty in getting up and/or lying down
  • Weight shift from one leg to the other
  • Reluctance to walk, jump or play
  • Refusing to use stairs or get in the car
  • Muscle atrophy
  • Yelping when touched
  • Limping

Also, as with any other illness, be in the lookout for changes in your dog’s personality, behavior and appetite.

Dogs of all ages are subject to hip dysplasia.

Usually hip dysplasia symptoms don’t begin to show up in a dog until the middle or later years of its life, although puppies as young as five or six months may begin to display pain and discomfort during and after exercise.

The condition will usually worsen until all normal activities become too painful for the dog to tolerate. You can help your dog recover its normal life through the use of Winston’s Joint System, an all-natural formula developed by a Naturopathic Doctor to heal his own beloved dog who suffered from hip dysplasia. For more than 30 years this proven formula has been giving relief from pain and stiffness to all breeds and ages of dogs.

Which dog breeds are susceptible to hip dysplasia?

Hip dysplasia is primarily a disease of large breeds like Golden Retrievers, Labrador Retrievers, Saint Bernards, German Shepherds, Rottweilers, and Great Danes. The disease can affect medium-sized breeds also, but rarely affects smaller breeds.

Hip dysplasia is also primarily a disease of purebred dogs but can develop in mixed breeds if their parents were breeds of dogs prone to developing hip dysplasia.

Are there specific risk factors for developing hip dysplasia?

Genes
Hip dysplasia is caused by one of the hip joint bones moving out of place. This creates abnormal wearing away of the joint tissue and cartilage. Arthritis and pain then increase as the dog ages.

It is a genetic disease, meaning if one or both of a dog’s parents has hip dysplasia, then it is at a greater risk for developing the disease. If a dog’s lineage showed no signs of hip problems, then it probably will not develop dysplasia.

Weight
It appears that the amount of calories a dog consumes, especially during its fast-growth period from three to ten months, has the biggest impact on whether or not a dog genetically prone to hip dysplasia will develop the disease.

Obesity can increase the seriousness of hip dysplasia in genetically susceptible dogs. If a dog is genetically prone to hip dysplasia and is also overweight, it has a much higher risk of developing hip dysplasia.

Intense exercise
Exercise can also be factor in developing the disease. Dogs that are genetically predisposed to the disease can have an increased incidence of hip dysplasia if over-exercised when they are young. However, dogs with large leg muscles are less likely to develop hip dysplasia than dogs with small muscles.

Moderate exercise such as running and swimming would be beneficial to a dog, but any exercise that places a lot of pressure on the joints would not be.

Since 1990, Winston’s Joint System and Winston’s Pain Formula have helped heal over twenty thousand dogs from all over the world. Our staff specializes in hip dysplasia, arthritis and all joint, pain and mobility issues.

There is an excellent chance we can help your dog, so please contact us at: www.dogshealth.com or call our toll free number at 888-901-5557.

Joint Disease in Dogs

It’s evitable that many dogs will develop some form of joint disease during their lives. It may be mild and unnoticeable, or it could be debilitating, severely affecting a dog’s quality of life by causing complete lameness and the inability to get up and down without help.

Some dogs will develop joint disease in the first few years of their lives but not display any visible signs until much later in life. This is often dependent on the dog’s breed. Dogs are also very susceptible to arthritis, and larger dog breeds are more vulnerable than smaller breeds.

The most common signs of joint disease in dogs include stiffness, limping, or favoring one limb over another. After awakening from sleep a dog with joint disease may find it difficult to get up or be reluctant to climb stairs.

Diseases that can affect a dog’s joints fall into ten major classifications. These joint diseases occur as a result of
(1) ligament, tendon, or muscle disease,
(2) bone fractures involving the joint,
(3) dietary and hormonal diseases such as hyperparathyroidism and obesity,
(4) developmental disorders like hip dysplasia and elbow dysplasia or OCD,
(5) congenital disorders,
(6) metabolic disorders,
(7) cancer,
(8) inflammatory joint diseases like Lyme disease or rheumatoid arthritis,
(9) degenerative joint disease (osteoarthritis), and
(10) degenerative spinal joint disease.

Treatment of joint disease in dogs

The treatment of hip dysplasia and osteoarthritis has vastly improved with the introduction of supplements like Winston’s Joint System.

Because hip dysplasia is primarily an inherited condition, there is no product on the market that can prevent its development, only treat it.

Dogs with hip dysplasia will need to be fed a proper diet and be put on a limited exercise routine.

There are anti-inflammatories like Rimadyl that are used to relieve a dog’s pain. Since Rimadyl and other drugs are controlled substances, they are available only through veterinarians.

Unfortunately, drugs like Rimadyl cannot decrease the progression of degenerative joint disease and often have serious side effects. You should consult with your vet and learn about all the possible side effects before agreeing to treat your dog with prescription medications such as Rimadyl.

Surgery is sometimes performed on dogs with serious cases of hip dysplasia. These surgeries are not always able to stop the progression of the disease and some dogs benefit only by having their lives made a little more comfortable.

Because of the high cost of this type of surgery and the questionable value of performing the procedure on older dogs, the management of pain and inflammation remains the only realistic option for many pet owners.

Weight management is very important for all dogs suffering from hip dysplasia. If surgery or other medical procedure is deemed necessary, the results will be more beneficial if the dog is not overweight.

Up to half of the dogs in the U.S. are overweight, so chances are very good that dogs with hip dysplasia or osteoarthritis are also overweight. Helping a dog lose pounds and get back to its recommended weight is one of the most important things a dog owner can do to help their pet who is suffering from hip dysplasia or arthritis.

Dogs who are overweight and are diagnosed with hip dysplasia or arthritis need to be exercised in ways that provide a good range of motion and muscle building, while limiting wear and tear on the dog’s joints.

Walking, swimming, slow jogging, and going up and down stairs are excellent low-impact exercises. An exercise program should be tailored to a dog based on the severity of the hip dysplasia or osteoarthritis.

The dog’s weight and physical condition must be factored into planning the types of exercise it should be subjected to. The wrong type of exercise can cause harm to the dog. A veterinarian will be able to recommend the best exercise program that’s appropriate for the dog’s condition.

Glucosamine and chondroitin are two supplements commonly used to treat animals for osteoarthritis. They are effective on some dogs but not on all dogs.

Glucosamine is the major sugar found in the important building blocks necessary for the synthesis and maintenance of joint cartilage.

Chondroitin enhances this synthesis and prevents damage of enzymes in the joint. These products are not painkillers.

Glucosamine and chondroitin work on the dog’s cartilage-forming cells in an attempt to repair the damaged cartilage. These products take at least six weeks to begin their healing, and if successful, a dog will need to continue taking the products for the rest of their lives to prevent further cartilage breakdown.

Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have been developed for dogs with osteoarthritis. Carprofen, marketed as Rimadyl is the best known of these medications. It is a strong painkiller and anti-inflammatory agent, and is available only by prescription because of its potential for serious side effects.

A much safer treatment for dogs suffering with joint diseases such as arthritis, bursitis, osteochondrosis (OCD), hip dysplasia and other degenerative joint disease is Winston’s Joint System, a combination of three, totally-natural whole food supplements developed by a Naturopathic Doctor for his own dog. Winston’s contains no potentially dangerous drugs.

Joint disease is a condition that affects a large number of dogs and there is no known cure. Surgery works for some dogs but is almost prohibitively expensive. If your dog has been diagnosed with arthritis, bursitis, osteochondrosis (OCD), hip dysplasia or other degenerative joint disease, you owe it to your pet to help make its life better by treating it with Winston’s proven formula.

Since 1990, Winston’s Joint System and Winston’s Pain Formula have helped heal over twenty thousand dogs from all over the world. Our staff specializes in hip dysplasia, arthritis and all joint, pain and mobility issues.

There is an excellent chance we can help your dog, so please contact us at: www.dogshealth.com or call our toll free number at 888-901-5557.