How to Tell If Your Dog Has Arthritis

You can tell if your dog has arthritis by watching for a number of symptoms. Arthritis in dogs is a condition affecting the skeletal system causing the joints in the legs to swell up and become painful. The disease can severely limit the ability of the dog to perform certain movements.

The most noticeable symptoms of arthritis in a dog include limping; a lack of flexibility in the legs; sustained inactivity where a dog may not move from one spot all day long; fatigue to the point of not wanting to go on its usual walks; irritability if you touch its affected limbs or joints; a recognizable change in appetite; sleep patterns that have changed significantly (the dog sleeps more during the day and may be awake at night due to pain); and an intolerance to cold, causing the dog to seek out warmer areas of the house to lie down or sleep.

Arthritis occurs in dogs normally after the age of 7 or 8 and can affect dogs of any breed. Larger dog breeds have a tendency to develop arthritis at an earlier age. Arthritis is considered a disease of old age and affects approximately one in every five dogs. However, younger dogs can also develop arthritis.

If your dog has arthritis, it may experience either mild or severe pain due to swelling of the joints.

The only way to truly know if your dog has arthritis is to consult a veterinarian who will determine if the problem is arthritis or whether the pain is due to some other cause. The vet will probably take X-rays and may perform a bone density test before making a diagnosis.

Arthritis is not a reversible condition and there is no cure for it, but the pain can be controlled by placing your dog on a daily regimen of Winston’s Joint System, a combination of three, totally-natural whole food supplements developed by a Naturopathic Doctor for his own dog. This supplement system also includes an anti-inflammatory agent to help reduce pain.

Daily exercise of some sort is recommended for any dog that has arthritis. If your dog loves water, swimming is an excellent form of exercise for dogs with arthritis because the buoyancy of the water can help by making the dog’s joints feel pain free.

Since 1990, Winston’s Joint System and Winston’s Pain Formula have helped heal over twenty thousand dogs from all over the world. Our staff specializes in hip dysplasia, arthritis and all joint, pain and mobility issues.

There is an excellent chance we can help your dog, so please contact us at: www.dogshealth.com or call our toll free number at 888-901-5557.

Hip Dysplasia in Standard Schnauzers

Standard Schnauzers are big-boned and muscular with square, medium-sized frames which would cause a person to assume that hip dysplasia in Standard Schnauzers would not be a problem.

Standard Schnauzers

Standard Schnauzers are enjoyable dogs to have as pets but they need a lot of positive guidance to offset their forceful personalities.

Before committing yourself to owning a Standard Schnauzer you should be aware that they require a lot of playtime with their owner and strong obedience training and exercises.

They are robust, hard-working dogs but also affectionate and cuddly when they feel like it. Schnauzers make good family dogs and love to be involved in all your family’s activities.

Schnauzers are playful, patient, and very protective of their child companions. They are world-class watchdogs, determined, but with a keen sense of control. They will bark loudly when they sense a threat to their household, but they don’t bark randomly or excessively.

Standard Schnauzers are high-energy dogs needing lots of exercise and activity. You’ll need to take them on daily walks or jogs. Too little exercise can lead to destructive behaviors like chewing on your furniture or clothing, or digging holes in your backyard.

You need to exercise caution on your walks as they will often challenge and threaten larger dogs they meet. Always walk them on a leash. As they grow older they become very territorial.

Schnauzers need to be brushed regularly to avoid matting of their coat. They really should have regular professional grooming to keep them looking their finest.

The Standard Schnauzer dates back to 15th-century Germany, and is the basis for both the Miniature Schnauzer and the Giant Schnauzer.

They were originally bred to keep rats out of barns and also made good guard dogs for traveling merchants who needed protection for their wagons at night.

Standard Schnauzers have thick, wiry coats. They have elongated heads with bushy mustaches, beards and eyebrows. Their eyes are oval-shaped, and their ears V-shaped and bent forward. They come in solid black and salt and pepper coloring.

Healthy Standard Schnauzers can live 15 years or longer.

They are not susceptible to a wide array of diseases but they often develop health complications like cataracts, and a small percentage develop hip dysplasia as they age.

Hip dysplasia in Standard Schnauzers

Hip dysplasia is a genetic disease that primarily affects large and giant breeds of dogs but can also affect medium-sized breeds and occasionally small breeds. It is primarily a disease of purebreds, although it can also occur in mixed breeds.

To understand hip dysplasia in Standard Schnauzers and the resulting arthritis, you need a basic understanding of how the dog’s hip joint is affected.

The hip joint is comprised of a ball and socket that forms the attachment of the hind leg to the body. The ball portion is the head of the femur and the socket is located on the pelvis.

In a normal hip joint the ball rotates freely within the socket. The bones are shaped to perfectly match each other with the socket surrounding the ball.

To strengthen the joint, the two bones are held together by a strong ligament. The joint capsule, a strong band of connective tissue, circles the two bones to provide added stability.

Example of a normal hip joint:

Hip dysplasia is linked to abnormal joint structure and a laxity of the muscles, connective tissue, and ligaments that would normally support the dog’s hip joints.

As the disease progresses, the articular surfaces of the two bones lose contact with each other. This separation of the two bones within the joint causes a drastic change in the size and shape of the articular surfaces.

Example of an abnormal hip joint:

Most Schnauzers who eventually develop hip dysplasia are born with normal hips, but due to their genetic make-up the soft tissues surrounding the joint develop abnormally. This leads to the symptoms associated with hip dysplasia. The disease may affect both hips, or only the right or left hip.

The symptoms of hip dysplasia in Standard Schnauzers cause afflicted dogs to walk or run with an altered gait, similar to a bunny-hop.

They begin to resist any movement that requires full extension or flexion of the rear legs. They will experience stiffness and pain in their rear legs after exercising and on first rising in the morning. Climbing stairs becomes difficult if not impossible. Some dogs will limp and are less willing to participate in normal daily activities, including walks they formerly enjoyed.

It appears that the amount of calories a dog consumes, especially during its fast-growth period from three to ten months, has the biggest impact on whether or not a dog genetically prone to hip dysplasia will develop the disease.

Obesity can increase the severity of the disease in dogs that are genetically susceptible and the extra weight will intensify the degeneration of a dog’s joints and hips.

Dogs who are genetically prone to hip problems -like a Standard Schnauzer- and who also overweight, are at a much higher risk of developing hip dysplasia and eventually osteoarthritis.

Exercise can be another risk factor. Dogs genetically susceptible to hip dysplasia may have an increased incidence of the disease if they are over-exercised at a young age. Moderate exercise like running and swimming is best for exercising young dogs.

Prevention

Because hip dysplasia is primarily an inherited condition, there are no products that can prevent its development.

Through proper diet, exercise, and a daily regimen of Winston’s Joint System, you can slow, and sometimes halt, the progression of these degenerative joint diseases while providing your dog with relief from its pain. Winston’s provides many of the raw materials essential for the synthesis of the joint-lubricating synovial fluid as well as the repair of articular cartilage and connective tissue.

You might also want to consider providing your dog with an orthopedic bed like the Canine Cooler Bed which distributes the dog’s weight evenly and reduces pressure on its joints. The Canine Cooler Bed uses revolutionary SoothSoft Technology to give your dog the very best in comfort, and the fluid-enhanced design offers a dry, cooling effect with superior cushioning and support. It’s perfect for dogs with hip dysplasia or arthritis.

There are different opinions on how to prevent the progression of hip dysplasia in Standard Schnauzers.

Poor nutrition, inadequate or improper exercise, and increased body weight may all contribute to the severity of osteoarthritis after the hip dysplasia has developed.

Watching the calories your puppy or young dog consumes and preventing obesity in your dog, allowing only non-stressful types of exercise, and a daily regimen of Winston’s Joint System, are the best things you can do for your dog.

Since 1990, Winston’s Joint System and Winston’s Pain Formula have helped heal over twenty thousand dogs from all over the world. Our staff specializes in hip dysplasia, arthritis and all joint, pain and mobility issues.

There is an excellent chance we can help your dog, so please contact us at: www.dogshealth.com or call our toll free number at 888-901-5557.

History of Rimadyl

The history of Rimadyl dates back to January of 1997 when Pfizer Pharmaceuticals first introduced the drug to veterinarians. The generic for Rimadyl, Carprofen, was marketed much later. Many dog owners whose pets suffer from arthritis or hip dysplasia believe that Rimadyl has improved the quality of their dogs’ lives. However, as a responsible dog owner, you need to be aware that there is sufficient evidence proving that Rimadyl can have very serious side effects for an animal.

Some dogs have died after being prescribed Rimadyl. Most of these cases have been attributed to the unexpected and swift onset of the well-known side effects of Rimadyl.

Labrador Retrievers, as well as their cousins, the Golden Retrievers, are more prone than most breeds to developing hip dysplasia, arthritis and other debilitating joint diseases. Pfizer first reported that Labradors were particularly at risk from Rimadyl’s toxicity. Pfizer’s report on side effects that occurred during the drug’s initial post-approval phase states, “. . . approximately one fourth of all hepatic reports were in Labrador Retrievers.”

This is an alarmingly high rate of incidence and if you are the owner of a Labrador who suffers from a debilitating joint disease and your vet has prescribed Rimadyl, you need to exercise extreme caution so you are not putting your dog’s health or its life at risk. Besides Labrador Retrievers, many breeds who have been prescribed Rimadyl have experienced side effects or death from Rimadyl.

Your veterinarian should pre-screen your dog before prescribing Rimadyl. Follow-up testing and close monitoring of the dog for possible toxic reactions is equally important.

Rimadyl or its generic Carprofen are not recommended for dogs who have bleeding disorders, liver disease, inflammatory bowel disease, or are inclined to suffer from gastrointestinal ulceration.

Rimadyl should never be given along with any other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) such as aspirin, or any corticosteroids such as prednisone, prednisolone, or dexamethasone. It is also not advisable to give the drug to pregnant or nursing female dogs because it has not been tested as being safe for the mother or the unborn puppies.

Before agreeing with your vet that Rimadyl is the best solution for your dog’s joint problems, discuss the benefits of the drug against the risks. It has been widely reported that many veterinarians are not completely informed about the serious side-effects of Rimadyl.

If you decide your dog might benefit from Rimadyl and you believe that it’s worth the risks involved, ask your veterinarian to start by prescribing the lowest possible dosage that can be used to obtain relief, and then increase the dosage if necessary. The recommended dosage is one mg per pound of a dog’s weight, given twice a day. It’s possible that your dog may obtain relief at a lower dosage which might possibly help in avoiding toxicity. Some vets recommend that Rimadyl be used only for a period of several weeks, followed by several weeks off the drug to give the dog’s liver time to recover from the toxic effects of the drug.

As soon as your dog begins taking Rimadyl you need to carefully watch for the following symptoms which are signs of potential life-threatening reactions to the drug:

• loss of appetite
• refusal to drink water or an increased thirst
• vomiting – occasionally with flecks of blood in the vomit
• diarrhea
• black, tarry stools
• lethargy or unusual drowsiness
• hyperactivity or constant restlessness
• sudden aggressiveness when none was evident before
• weakness or partial paralysis
• seizures or loss of balance

If any of these symptoms occur, IMMEDIATELY STOP giving your pet the drug and take it to the vet. The earlier you discover the problem, the better the chances your dog will have a complete recovery.

Is Rimadyl a “miracle drug” for dogs or are the potential side effects too dangerous? The history of Rimadyl has been plagued with several serious problems; (1) a lack of adequate warnings about the potential serious and deadly side effects of the drug, (2) the large and unacceptable number of veterinarians who are unaware of Rimadyl’s serious side effects, and (3) the severity and sometimes sudden onset of the side effects which can result in the death of the dog being given Rimadyl.

A safer and more effective treatment for arthritis and hip dysplasia is Winston’s Joint System, an all-natural formula developed by a Naturopathic Doctor to heal his own beloved dog. For over 20 years, this long-proven formula has been providing relief from the pain and stiffness of arthritis and hip dysplasia to all breeds and ages of dogs.

If your pet suffers from any of the following joint problems, you should place it on a daily regimen of Winston’s Joint System to give welcome relief from its pain:

* Hip Dysplasia
* Arthritis
* Osteochondritis (OCD)
* Stiffness/Inflammation
* Ligament Tears
* Growing Pains
* Mobility Problems
* Joint Pains

With the information presented here, and a consultation with your vet, you should be able to decide whether the risks of administering Rimadyl are worth the possible benefits. For myself, I’d rather be safe using Winston’s Joint System than be sorry and endanger my loving dog’s health or even worse, contribute to its death.

Degenerative Joint Disease – What Is It, Causes, Symptoms & Treatment

The terms arthritis, osteoarthritis, hip dysplasia, OCD, and degenerative joint disease are often used to describe the same joint problems in dogs.

But no matter what it is called, the result is pain and inflammation in a dog’s joints. The term “arthritis” is the most common one used to describe this joint disease that can easily -and usually does at some point- incapacitate a dog.

What is Degenerative Joint Disease?

Degenerative joint disease is characterized by the loss of the smooth cartilage that covers and protects the end of the bones in the dog’s movable joints.

There are no nerves in the cartilage, so when it touches the cartilage of another bone, the dog feels no pain.

But when the cartilage wears away due to aging or joint disease, the bone becomes exposed. The bone does have nerves, so when the two bone ends in a joint touch each other, it results in pain and inflammation – sure signs that some form of degenerative joint disease is present.

In degenerative joint disease, small bony projections form on the bone that is close to the joint. This adds considerably to a dog’s pain. This type of degenerative joint disease is progressive, meaning it continues to get worse until the poor dog has considerable difficulty getting up and down by itself. The pain is so severe in some dogs that they are unable to stand or walk.

What causes degenerative joint disease?

Degenerative joint disease can occur simply as a result of wear and tear on an otherwise normal joint and occurs as the dog ages. Veterinarians refer to this stage of the disease as “primary degenerative joint disease”.

Osteoarthritis may also occur as a result of another condition that affects a dog’s joints. This is what is known as “secondary degenerative joint disease” and is identified either as hip dysplasia or elbow dysplasia.

Which dogs are at risk of developing degenerative joint disease?

Certainly any dog with a congenital joint problem, like hip dysplasia, is going to be more prone to developing degenerative joint disease.

Dogs who have had injury to a joint such as a fracture involving the joint, or a ruptured ligament in the knee will be more likely to develop arthritis.

What are the symptoms of degenerative joint disease?

The symptoms of arthritis will vary as to which joints are involved, the age of the dog, and the severity of the disease.

The first symptoms an owner usually notices is a change in the way a dog walks since the dog will try to put more of its weight on the unaffected limbs. There may be muscle atrophy (reduction in the size of the muscle) in the affected limb because the dog is using it less, or at least putting less weight on it.

For a dog with hip dysplasia in both hind legs, the muscles of those legs may be thin, where the muscles of the chest and shoulders may increase in size because the dog is putting more weight on the front legs.

Many times the dog may find it difficult to get up after lying down and appears to be stiff. The dog also may be unable to jump up into the car. Many dogs with degenerative joint disease find it difficult to go up or down stairs.

Depending upon the amount of pain the dog is experiencing, its appetite may change and it may also choose to be alone more often.

The dog’s joints are generally not swollen and the pain it experiences is a dull aching type, so a dog usually will not cry out in pain. Some dogs will lick or bite at the area that is painful, while others will seek out warm or soft places to sleep.

How is degenerative joint disease diagnosed?

Your veterinarian will take a history of your dog’s symptoms and perform a complete physical exam. X-rays will be taken. Other lab tests or more detailed exams of the affected joints may be undertaken.

How is degenerative joint disease treated?

Some forms of degenerative joint disease can be treated without surgery. Winston’s Joint System is an all-natural formula developed by a Naturopathic Doctor to heal his own beloved dog. For over 20 years, this proven formula has been giving relief from the pain and stiffness of degenerative joint diseases to all breeds and ages of dogs. Owners who have discovered and used Winston’s report that their pets have a new-found vitality and alertness now that they are free of pain.

Degenerative joint disease does not heal itself. It is a progressive, debilitating disease that will continue to worsen without treatment. This is all the more reason to start your dog on Winston’s Joint System as soon as your vet gives you a diagnosis of hip dysplasia, arthritis, OCD, or any degenerative joint disease. Winston’s is a tried and proven formula that will slow down the progression of your dog’s joint disease and many dogs will respond well and can live comfortably for years. Your dog will love you for the gift of years of pain-free living.

Since 1990, Winston’s Joint System and Winston’s Pain Formula have helped heal over twenty thousand dogs from all over the world. Our staff specializes in hip dysplasia, arthritis and all joint, pain and mobility issues.

There is an excellent chance we can help your dog, so please contact us at: www.dogshealth.com or call our toll free number at 888-901-5557.

Arthritis in Older Dogs

Just like humans, older dogs are susceptible to many diseases, arthritis and hip dysplasia being two of the most common ailments. If your dog is affected by arthritis, there are some things you’ll need to do to make sure it’s comfortable at all times and has the ability – and mobility – to enjoy its “golden years.”

Arthritis is a problem affecting a dog’s joints and is caused by a natural reduction in glucosamine which is essential for healthy bones.

A dog’s joints become swollen and painful, making it difficult to move about.

Most dogs with arthritis will suffer from pain when attempting certain activities like walking or climbing stairs.

Remedies & treatment for arthritis in older dogs

Dogs with arthritis also require a special diet containing additional vitamins and minerals.

The diet for a dog with arthritis needs to be easily digestible and should contain fewer proteins. Carbohydrates should be eliminated from the dog’s diet as much as possible.

If the dog is obese, a weight loss diet is absolutely necessary because the extra weight can cause additional pain in the dog’s joints. Senior dogs are the most apt to suffer from arthritis and a vet may recommend a wet food diet for an older dog.

Arthritis in older dogs will require administering supplements that help with joint support and make the dog more comfortable. Winston’s Joint System is an all-natural formula developed by a Naturopathic Doctor to heal his own beloved dog. For over 20 years, this proven formula has been helping dogs find relief from the pain and stiffness caused by arthritis and hip dysplasia.

Dogs suffering from either of these debilitating diseases also need extra vitamins and minerals too. The dog will also benefit from a pain relieving supplement like Winston’s Pain Formula, It’s fast acting and highly effective and works exceptionally well with Winston’s Joint System to give comfort to an ailing dog.

Arthritis in older dogs can be more debilitating than it is for younger dogs. Younger dogs are usually able to handle the pain of arthritis a little easier and they may limp or slow down their movements, whereas an older, senior dog is unable to do the same.

Since 1990, Winston’s Joint System and Winston’s Pain Formula have helped heal over twenty thousand dogs from all over the world. Our staff specializes in hip dysplasia, arthritis and all joint, pain and mobility issues.

There is an excellent chance we can help your dog, so please contact us at: www.dogshealth.com or call our toll free number at 888-901-5557.

Arthritis, Dogs and Dinosaurs

Arthritis is one of the oldest diseases known to mankind. Surprisingly, science has shown that dinosaurs also had arthritis and there is evidence that early humans had the same chronic aches and pains. So it’s understandable that dogs can develop arthritis also. In fact, arthritis is a common disease affecting man’s best friend.

Did you know that managing your dog’s arthritis can help you better manage your own arthritis? Owning and being responsible for a pet dog can give you a positive outlook on life, improve your attitude and give a lift to your spirits. It is a fact that pet-owners tend to live longer and average fewer visits to their doctor’s office.

Arthritis affects dogs of all ages just as it affects people of all ages. If you notice changes in your dog’s mood and activity, and it doesn’t seem to be feeling too good, you may think it has a cold or stomach virus, but it could be arthritis. Arthritis affects one in every five adult dogs in the U.S. and is one of the most common sources of chronic pain that veterinarians treat.

The question then remains, how do you know if it’s arthritis? Your dog can’t tell you what’s wrong with it, so it’s important to watch for non-verbal cues and take even subtle changes seriously.

There are certain signs that your dog may have arthritis. You may notice it favoring one leg, experiencing difficulty sitting or standing, sleeping more, appearing to have stiff or sore joints, being hesitant to jump, run or climb stairs, gaining weight, being less interested in playing, demonstrating a decrease in normal activity, displaying changes in attitude or behavior, and being less alert.

If your dog displays any of these symptoms for more than two weeks, schedule an appointment with your veterinarian for an arthritis evaluation, which will involve a physical exam and X-rays. The best thing you can do for your dog to help manage arthritis is to get a diagnosis from the vet and start a treatment plan as soon as possible.

Recommended treatments may include the following:

(1) A healthy diet and exercise to help maintain proper weight

(2) Working with your veterinarian to find a drug treatment using nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS) which is the most common form of pharmaceutical treatment for arthritis in dogs

(3) Over-the-counter pet treatments, such as food containing either glucosamine and chondroitin sulfate or Omega fatty acids. These have been shown to offer some help in relieving the symptoms of arthritis in dogs

(4) A veterinarian-prescribed anti-inflammatory drugs and an over-the-counter treatment that together may help decrease pain and disease progression.

The most complete and effective treatment I have discovered for my own 8 year old Great Dane who has arthritis, is Winston’s Joint System, a combination of three, totally-natural whole food supplements developed by a Naturopathic Doctor for his own dog. With Winston’s there was no need for drugs, and my dog has never suffered from the common side-effects caused by the drugs because Winston’s is just good whole food. And I don’t have to be concerned about dosage problems either because my dog’s body uses only what it needs.

Within the first 30 days after I started treating my dog with Winston’s Joint System, he began to show significant improvement in his arthritis symptoms.

No matter how you choose to treat your dog’s arthritis, make sure you work with your veterinarian to ensure that you select the best program that helps your loving companion. Early diagnosis and treatment, maintaining a healthy weight, and regular exercise are critical in treating a dog with arthritis.

 

Joint Disease in Dogs

It’s evitable that many dogs will develop some form of joint disease during their lives. It may be mild and unnoticeable, or it could be debilitating, severely affecting a dog’s quality of life by causing complete lameness and the inability to get up and down without help.

Some dogs will develop joint disease in the first few years of their lives but not display any visible signs until much later in life. This is often dependent on the dog’s breed. Dogs are also very susceptible to arthritis, and larger dog breeds are more vulnerable than smaller breeds.

The most common signs of joint disease in dogs include stiffness, limping, or favoring one limb over another. After awakening from sleep a dog with joint disease may find it difficult to get up or be reluctant to climb stairs.

Diseases that can affect a dog’s joints fall into ten major classifications. These joint diseases occur as a result of
(1) ligament, tendon, or muscle disease,
(2) bone fractures involving the joint,
(3) dietary and hormonal diseases such as hyperparathyroidism and obesity,
(4) developmental disorders like hip dysplasia and elbow dysplasia or OCD,
(5) congenital disorders,
(6) metabolic disorders,
(7) cancer,
(8) inflammatory joint diseases like Lyme disease or rheumatoid arthritis,
(9) degenerative joint disease (osteoarthritis), and
(10) degenerative spinal joint disease.

Treatment of joint disease in dogs

The treatment of hip dysplasia and osteoarthritis has vastly improved with the introduction of supplements like Winston’s Joint System.

Because hip dysplasia is primarily an inherited condition, there is no product on the market that can prevent its development, only treat it.

Dogs with hip dysplasia will need to be fed a proper diet and be put on a limited exercise routine.

There are anti-inflammatories like Rimadyl that are used to relieve a dog’s pain. Since Rimadyl and other drugs are controlled substances, they are available only through veterinarians.

Unfortunately, drugs like Rimadyl cannot decrease the progression of degenerative joint disease and often have serious side effects. You should consult with your vet and learn about all the possible side effects before agreeing to treat your dog with prescription medications such as Rimadyl.

Surgery is sometimes performed on dogs with serious cases of hip dysplasia. These surgeries are not always able to stop the progression of the disease and some dogs benefit only by having their lives made a little more comfortable.

Because of the high cost of this type of surgery and the questionable value of performing the procedure on older dogs, the management of pain and inflammation remains the only realistic option for many pet owners.

Weight management is very important for all dogs suffering from hip dysplasia. If surgery or other medical procedure is deemed necessary, the results will be more beneficial if the dog is not overweight.

Up to half of the dogs in the U.S. are overweight, so chances are very good that dogs with hip dysplasia or osteoarthritis are also overweight. Helping a dog lose pounds and get back to its recommended weight is one of the most important things a dog owner can do to help their pet who is suffering from hip dysplasia or arthritis.

Dogs who are overweight and are diagnosed with hip dysplasia or arthritis need to be exercised in ways that provide a good range of motion and muscle building, while limiting wear and tear on the dog’s joints.

Walking, swimming, slow jogging, and going up and down stairs are excellent low-impact exercises. An exercise program should be tailored to a dog based on the severity of the hip dysplasia or osteoarthritis.

The dog’s weight and physical condition must be factored into planning the types of exercise it should be subjected to. The wrong type of exercise can cause harm to the dog. A veterinarian will be able to recommend the best exercise program that’s appropriate for the dog’s condition.

Glucosamine and chondroitin are two supplements commonly used to treat animals for osteoarthritis. They are effective on some dogs but not on all dogs.

Glucosamine is the major sugar found in the important building blocks necessary for the synthesis and maintenance of joint cartilage.

Chondroitin enhances this synthesis and prevents damage of enzymes in the joint. These products are not painkillers.

Glucosamine and chondroitin work on the dog’s cartilage-forming cells in an attempt to repair the damaged cartilage. These products take at least six weeks to begin their healing, and if successful, a dog will need to continue taking the products for the rest of their lives to prevent further cartilage breakdown.

Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have been developed for dogs with osteoarthritis. Carprofen, marketed as Rimadyl is the best known of these medications. It is a strong painkiller and anti-inflammatory agent, and is available only by prescription because of its potential for serious side effects.

A much safer treatment for dogs suffering with joint diseases such as arthritis, bursitis, osteochondrosis (OCD), hip dysplasia and other degenerative joint disease is Winston’s Joint System, a combination of three, totally-natural whole food supplements developed by a Naturopathic Doctor for his own dog. Winston’s contains no potentially dangerous drugs.

Joint disease is a condition that affects a large number of dogs and there is no known cure. Surgery works for some dogs but is almost prohibitively expensive. If your dog has been diagnosed with arthritis, bursitis, osteochondrosis (OCD), hip dysplasia or other degenerative joint disease, you owe it to your pet to help make its life better by treating it with Winston’s proven formula.

Since 1990, Winston’s Joint System and Winston’s Pain Formula have helped heal over twenty thousand dogs from all over the world. Our staff specializes in hip dysplasia, arthritis and all joint, pain and mobility issues.

There is an excellent chance we can help your dog, so please contact us at: www.dogshealth.com or call our toll free number at 888-901-5557.