Hip Dysplasia in Boxer Dogs

The Boxer is one of the most popular breeds in the U.S. and is ranked as the 6th most-registered breed by the American Kennel Club. Unfortunately, hip dysplasia in Boxers is a common health issue, causing them to suffer from this life-threatening disease.

Boxers

Boxers are proud, playful and fun-loving dogs, loyal to their family and friends, and particularly to children. They are naturally suspicious of strangers and consequently make excellent watch dogs that can also be trained to be guard dogs.

Boxers are intelligent and alert, but can be stubborn at times. Because of this stubbornness, early obedience training is usually recommended. Boxers are full of energy and require long and regular walks to control their enthusiasm. Besides making excellent family companions and guard dogs, Boxers often participate in obedience, tracking, and agility contests.

Due to their natural instincts, Boxers are also used as Search and Rescue Dogs as well as Therapy Dogs.

Hip dysplasia in Boxers

Hip dysplasia is a legacy disease passed through the genes of a dog’s parents or grandparents, but can also be acquired through environmental factors.

Statistics prove that loose-hipped Boxer dogs that mate with one another will give birth to Boxer puppies prone to hip dysplasia.

Obesity is also a risk factor for the development of hip dysplasia in Boxer dogs.

Obesity in dogs is usually caused by feeding them manufactured dog food that is over-supplemented with extra proteins, vitamins and minerals to make puppies grow faster. This fast growth of puppies can create orthopedic problems in some breeds of dogs like Boxers, resulting in hip dysplasia and arthritis.

When a dog has hip dysplasia, it has an abnormal development of the ball and socket joint that makes up the hip. The ball and the socket don’t fit together correctly, resulting in painful and damaging friction between the two parts.

When a dog places its weight on the joint, the friction strains the joint capsule that produces joint fluid. The straining then damages the cartilage and leads to the release of inflammatory proteins within the joint.

The cartilage is eventually destroyed and becomes inflamed, causing the pain symptoms associated with hip dysplasia and arthritis.

Boxer dogs with hip dysplasia experience the same signs and symptoms as other dogs including decreased activity, difficulty getting up and lying down, rear limb lameness, a reluctance to use the stairs, and an unwillingness to jump or stand on its hind limbs.

Treatment

Some owners opt for surgery or even a total hip replacement, hoping for a complete recovery from dysplasia, but all too often there are complications during recovery, requiring the removal of the hip implants.

There are also non-surgical methods for treating hip dysplasia such as pain medications, weight loss programs, controlled exercise, and physical therapy.

A proven and effective treatment for dogs suffering from hip dysplasia is with a regimen of Winston’s Joint System, a combination of three, totally-natural whole food supplements developed by a Naturopathic Doctor for his own dog. With Winston’s, there are no dangerous drugs with their often serious side-effects. Within the first 30 days of treatment, dogs on this product show noticeable and often remarkable improvement.

Prevention

In order to reduce the incidence of hip dysplasia in Boxer dogs, careful breeding is the best measure of prevention.

It isn’t always easy to avoid breeding Boxers with the intent of avoiding the eventual development of hip dysplasia because it’s so difficult to detect hip dysplasia in dogs that don’t show signs of the disease.

A proper diet can also help to prevent hip dysplasia.

Avoid feeding puppies over-supplemented, high-protein food, thereby avoiding too rapid weight gain. Dogs fed calorie-limited diets will reach the same adult size more slowly but with a reduced possibility of developing hip dysplasia.

It is always best to consult with your veterinarian regarding specific diets and proper feeding schedules to minimize the risk of your puppy or young dog developing life-threatening hip dysplasia.

Many vets recommend X-rays of at-risk breeds like Boxers, so have your Boxer checked for hip dysplasia in order to keep it healthy and active and able to enjoy a long, happy, disease-free life.

There are different assumptions on how to prevent the progression of hip dysplasia in Boxer dogs.

Poor nutrition, inadequate or improper exercise, and increased body weight may all contribute to the severity of the disease. Watching the calories your puppy or young dog consumes and preventing obesity in your dog, allowing only non-stressful types of exercise, and a daily regimen of Winston’s Joint System, are the best things you can do for your dog.

Since 1990, Winston’s Joint System and Winston’s Pain Formula have helped heal over twenty thousand dogs from all over the world. Our staff specializes in hip dysplasia, arthritis and all joint, pain and mobility issues.

There is an excellent chance we can help your dog, so please contact us at: www.dogshealth.com or call our toll free number at 888-901-5557.

Hip Dysplasia in a Bichon Frise

Bichon Frises are small, sturdy pet dogs that easily adapt to most environments. They are are generally free of major debilitating illnesses like hip dysplasia and arthritis that strike other dogs their size.

Bichon Frise

A Bichon Frise is a charming, friendly and intelligent companion, naturally sociable and generally friendly to the whole family and even other pets. They are easily trained and eager to please, with a gentle and affectionate manner. They crave human companionship and will suffer emotional distress if they are neglected for any length of time.

Intelligent and alert, Bichon Frises also have spirited personalities that often result in unexpected and sudden rushes of energy. These outbursts are rarely destructive and usually involve just a lot of running around the house.

Even though they are generally friendly to strangers, Bichons will still bark and make a commotion if they sense a threat to their family.

Bichon Frises are noted for being congenial to an owner’s neighbors and friends. They don’t require a lot of exercise, making them ideal apartment dwellers.

They are ideal dogs for people with allergies as they don’t shed much, but regular brushing is needed to prevent their coat from matting. If you don’t brush their hair at least weekly, they’ll begin looking a little scruffy.

The Bichon Frise originated in the Mediterranean area of Europe and descended from a mixture of Poodles and Water Spaniels. It is thought that Spanish and Italian sailors discovered these dogs and carried them around the world on their merchant voyages, sometimes using them to barter for other merchandise.

Bichon Frises are small and sturdy with puffball coats which are sometimes groomed in a lion-style featuring a close-cut body and a puffed up mane. They have slightly rounded heads, medium-length muzzles, hanging ears covered in hair, and protruding black noses. Their dark eyes have a curious and lively expression. Their coat consists of a rough and curly outer layer with a soft, dense inner coat.

The average Bichon Frise can live as long as 15 years. Health problems include allergies, cataracts and hip dysplasia.

Hip dysplasia in a Bichon Frise

Hip dysplasia is a genetic disease that primarily affects large and giant breeds of dogs but can also affect medium-sized breeds and occasionally small breeds. It is primarily a disease of purebreds, although it can also occur in mixed breeds.

To understand hip dysplasia and the resulting arthritis, you need a basic understanding of how the dog’s hip joint is affected. The hip joint is comprised of a ball and socket that forms the attachment of the hind leg to the body. The ball portion is the head of the femur and the socket is located on the pelvis.

In a normal hip joint the ball rotates freely within the socket. The bones are shaped to perfectly match each other with the socket surrounding the ball. To strengthen the joint, the two bones are held together by a strong ligament. The joint capsule, a strong band of connective tissue, circles the two bones to provide added stability.

This is a normal hip joint:

Hip dysplasia in a Bichon Frise is linked to abnormal joint structure and a laxity of the muscles, connective tissue, and ligaments that would normally support the dog’s hip joints. As the disease progresses, the articular surfaces of the two bones lose contact with each other. This separation of the two bones within the joint causes a drastic change in the size and shape of the articular surfaces.

This is an abnormal hip joint:

Most dogs who eventually develop hip problems are born with normal hips, but due to their genetic make-up the soft tissues surrounding the joint develop abnormally. This leads to the symptoms associated with hip dysplasia. The disease may affect both hips, or only the right or left hip.

The symptoms of hip dysplasia cause afflicted dogs to walk or run with an altered gait, similar to a bunny-hop. They begin to resist any movement that requires full extension or flexion of the rear legs. They will experience stiffness and pain in their rear legs after exercising and on first rising in the morning. Climbing stairs becomes difficult if not impossible. Some dogs will limp and are less willing to participate in normal daily activities, including walks they formerly enjoyed.

Obesity can increase the severity of the disease in dogs that are genetically susceptible and the extra weight will intensify the degeneration of a dog’s joints and hips. Dogs who are genetically prone to hip dysplasia and also are overweight, are at a much higher risk of developing hip dysplasia and eventually osteoarthritis.

Exercise can be another risk factor. Dogs genetically susceptible to hip dysplasia may have an increased incidence of the disease if they are over-exercised at a young age. Moderate exercise like running and swimming is best for exercising young dogs.

Prevention

Because hip dysplasia is primarily an inherited condition, there are no products that can prevent its development.

Through proper diet, exercise, and a daily regimen of Winston’s Joint System, you can slow, and sometimes halt, the progression of these degenerative joint diseases while providing your dog with relief from its pain.

There are different assumptions on how to prevent the progression of hip dysplasia. Poor nutrition, inadequate or improper exercise, and increased body weight may all contribute to the severity of osteoarthritis after the hip dysplasia has developed. By watching the calories your puppy or young dog consumes and preventing obesity, allowing only non-stressful types of exercise, and a daily regimen of Winston’s Joint System, are the best things you can do for your dog.

Since 1990, Winston’s Joint System and Winston’s Pain Formula have helped heal over twenty thousand dogs from all over the world. Our staff specializes in hip dysplasia, arthritis and all joint, pain and mobility issues.

There is an excellent chance we can help your dog, so please contact us at: www.dogshealth.com or call our toll free number at 888-901-5557.

Hip Dysplasia in Standard Schnauzers

Standard Schnauzers are big-boned and muscular with square, medium-sized frames which would cause a person to assume that hip dysplasia in Standard Schnauzers would not be a problem.

Standard Schnauzers

Standard Schnauzers are enjoyable dogs to have as pets but they need a lot of positive guidance to offset their forceful personalities.

Before committing yourself to owning a Standard Schnauzer you should be aware that they require a lot of playtime with their owner and strong obedience training and exercises.

They are robust, hard-working dogs but also affectionate and cuddly when they feel like it. Schnauzers make good family dogs and love to be involved in all your family’s activities.

Schnauzers are playful, patient, and very protective of their child companions. They are world-class watchdogs, determined, but with a keen sense of control. They will bark loudly when they sense a threat to their household, but they don’t bark randomly or excessively.

Standard Schnauzers are high-energy dogs needing lots of exercise and activity. You’ll need to take them on daily walks or jogs. Too little exercise can lead to destructive behaviors like chewing on your furniture or clothing, or digging holes in your backyard.

You need to exercise caution on your walks as they will often challenge and threaten larger dogs they meet. Always walk them on a leash. As they grow older they become very territorial.

Schnauzers need to be brushed regularly to avoid matting of their coat. They really should have regular professional grooming to keep them looking their finest.

The Standard Schnauzer dates back to 15th-century Germany, and is the basis for both the Miniature Schnauzer and the Giant Schnauzer.

They were originally bred to keep rats out of barns and also made good guard dogs for traveling merchants who needed protection for their wagons at night.

Standard Schnauzers have thick, wiry coats. They have elongated heads with bushy mustaches, beards and eyebrows. Their eyes are oval-shaped, and their ears V-shaped and bent forward. They come in solid black and salt and pepper coloring.

Healthy Standard Schnauzers can live 15 years or longer.

They are not susceptible to a wide array of diseases but they often develop health complications like cataracts, and a small percentage develop hip dysplasia as they age.

Hip dysplasia in Standard Schnauzers

Hip dysplasia is a genetic disease that primarily affects large and giant breeds of dogs but can also affect medium-sized breeds and occasionally small breeds. It is primarily a disease of purebreds, although it can also occur in mixed breeds.

To understand hip dysplasia in Standard Schnauzers and the resulting arthritis, you need a basic understanding of how the dog’s hip joint is affected.

The hip joint is comprised of a ball and socket that forms the attachment of the hind leg to the body. The ball portion is the head of the femur and the socket is located on the pelvis.

In a normal hip joint the ball rotates freely within the socket. The bones are shaped to perfectly match each other with the socket surrounding the ball.

To strengthen the joint, the two bones are held together by a strong ligament. The joint capsule, a strong band of connective tissue, circles the two bones to provide added stability.

Example of a normal hip joint:

Hip dysplasia is linked to abnormal joint structure and a laxity of the muscles, connective tissue, and ligaments that would normally support the dog’s hip joints.

As the disease progresses, the articular surfaces of the two bones lose contact with each other. This separation of the two bones within the joint causes a drastic change in the size and shape of the articular surfaces.

Example of an abnormal hip joint:

Most Schnauzers who eventually develop hip dysplasia are born with normal hips, but due to their genetic make-up the soft tissues surrounding the joint develop abnormally. This leads to the symptoms associated with hip dysplasia. The disease may affect both hips, or only the right or left hip.

The symptoms of hip dysplasia in Standard Schnauzers cause afflicted dogs to walk or run with an altered gait, similar to a bunny-hop.

They begin to resist any movement that requires full extension or flexion of the rear legs. They will experience stiffness and pain in their rear legs after exercising and on first rising in the morning. Climbing stairs becomes difficult if not impossible. Some dogs will limp and are less willing to participate in normal daily activities, including walks they formerly enjoyed.

It appears that the amount of calories a dog consumes, especially during its fast-growth period from three to ten months, has the biggest impact on whether or not a dog genetically prone to hip dysplasia will develop the disease.

Obesity can increase the severity of the disease in dogs that are genetically susceptible and the extra weight will intensify the degeneration of a dog’s joints and hips.

Dogs who are genetically prone to hip problems -like a Standard Schnauzer- and who also overweight, are at a much higher risk of developing hip dysplasia and eventually osteoarthritis.

Exercise can be another risk factor. Dogs genetically susceptible to hip dysplasia may have an increased incidence of the disease if they are over-exercised at a young age. Moderate exercise like running and swimming is best for exercising young dogs.

Prevention

Because hip dysplasia is primarily an inherited condition, there are no products that can prevent its development.

Through proper diet, exercise, and a daily regimen of Winston’s Joint System, you can slow, and sometimes halt, the progression of these degenerative joint diseases while providing your dog with relief from its pain. Winston’s provides many of the raw materials essential for the synthesis of the joint-lubricating synovial fluid as well as the repair of articular cartilage and connective tissue.

You might also want to consider providing your dog with an orthopedic bed like the Canine Cooler Bed which distributes the dog’s weight evenly and reduces pressure on its joints. The Canine Cooler Bed uses revolutionary SoothSoft Technology to give your dog the very best in comfort, and the fluid-enhanced design offers a dry, cooling effect with superior cushioning and support. It’s perfect for dogs with hip dysplasia or arthritis.

There are different opinions on how to prevent the progression of hip dysplasia in Standard Schnauzers.

Poor nutrition, inadequate or improper exercise, and increased body weight may all contribute to the severity of osteoarthritis after the hip dysplasia has developed.

Watching the calories your puppy or young dog consumes and preventing obesity in your dog, allowing only non-stressful types of exercise, and a daily regimen of Winston’s Joint System, are the best things you can do for your dog.

Since 1990, Winston’s Joint System and Winston’s Pain Formula have helped heal over twenty thousand dogs from all over the world. Our staff specializes in hip dysplasia, arthritis and all joint, pain and mobility issues.

There is an excellent chance we can help your dog, so please contact us at: www.dogshealth.com or call our toll free number at 888-901-5557.

Hip Dysplasia in Bulldogs

Bulldogs are dependable, loyal and obedient. They have remarkable patience and tolerance and get along very well with other dogs and young children. One would assume that a breed of dog with such short legs would never be susceptible to hip dysplasia or arthritis. The truth is that hip dysplasia in Bulldogs is one of the most common health issues this breed is prone to.

Bulldogs

Bulldogs were bred in England for hundreds of years and were originally used in the 17th century for bull baiting –a gambling sport in which dogs fought bulls in a ring.

When bull baiting was outlawed in 1835, Bulldog breeders began to breed dogs that were kinder, heavier, and more relaxed, making them more popular as pets.

Wrinkled faces, fierce and tough looking, friendly and loving, easy to train, mellow and easygoing, courageous and sturdy. This is the description of a Bulldog, the ultimate buddy and an affectionate companion to a single person or a family. Bulldogs may look tough as nails, but they make sweet and gentle pets.

Apartment dwellers and couch potatoes might find Bulldogs the perfect pet: They don’t need too much space and are well-suited to living in apartments.

A pet Bulldog will hang out on the couch with you and watch hours of football or movie marathons. What you watch is of no concern to them, they simply want to be as close to you as possible and are very patient if you’re a rabid channel surfer.

But be advised, they can be very persistent when trying to get your attention, and if you ignore their hints to play and cuddle, they will pester you until they get what they want. They also tend to snore and snort so you’ll need to get used to their rude noises.

They are experts at forming close attachments with their owner or owners and sometimes this bond grows so strong, they’ll stay inside the house until you insist they go out to take care of their biological functions.

Bulldogs are not a good choice for a guard dog though. They can easily intimidate strangers just by their appearance and steady gaze, but they’re just as likely to cozy up and lick the hand of a stranger who acts friendly towards them.

Bulldogs like to chew on things. If you don’t want your furniture and personal things chewed to shreds, be sure to have plenty of ruggedly constructed doggie toys so they don’t start chewing your personal belongings.

Bulldogs are short, sturdy and stocky. With their wrinkled face and stocky builds, they look tough and intimidating.

They have wide heads with cheeks that draw back behind the eyes, thick folds of skin on the forehead, short muzzles, broad black noses, hanging upper lips, wide-set eyes, and small ears that fold back. Their short, sturdy limbs make them look like they are waddling when they walk. Their smooth coats come in a wide range of colors.

Healthy Bulldogs can live as long as 10 years, but they have a long list of hereditary health issues. Some Bulldogs suffer respiratory problems, eyesight problems, and hip dysplasia.

“Statistics from the Orthopedic Foundation for Animals indicate that of the 467 Bulldogs tested between 1979 and 2009 (30 years), 73.9% were affected by hip dysplasia, the highest amongst all breeds.”
– Source: Wikipedia

Hip dysplasia in Bulldogs

Hip dysplasia is a genetic disease that primarily affects large and giant breeds of dogs but can also affect medium-sized breeds and occasionally small breeds. It is primarily a disease of purebreds, although it can also occur in mixed breeds.

To understand hip dysplasia in Bulldogs and the resulting arthritis, you need a basic understanding of how the dog’s hip joint is affected.

The hip joint is comprised of a ball and socket that forms the attachment of the hind leg to the body. The ball portion is the head of the femur and the socket is located on the pelvis.

In a normal hip joint the ball rotates freely within the socket. The bones are shaped to perfectly match each other with the socket surrounding the ball. To strengthen the joint, the two bones are held together by a strong ligament.

The joint capsule, a strong band of connective tissue, circles the two bones to provide added stability.

This is an example of a healthy hip joint:

Hip dysplasia is linked to abnormal joint structure and a laxity of the muscles, connective tissue, and ligaments that would normally support the dog’s hip joints.

As the disease progresses, the articular surfaces of the two bones lose contact with each other. This separation of the two bones within the joint causes a drastic change in the size and shape of the articular surfaces.

This is an example of the hip joint of a Bulldog with hip dysplasia:

Most Bulldogs who eventually develop hip dysplasia are born with normal hips, but due to their genetic make-up the soft tissues surrounding the joint develop abnormally. This leads to the symptoms associated with hip dysplasia. The disease may affect both hips, or only the right or left hip.

The symptoms of hip dysplasia in Bulldogs cause afflicted dogs to walk or run with an altered gait, similar to a bunny-hop.
They begin to resist any movement that requires full extension or flexion of the rear legs. They will experience stiffness and pain in their rear legs after exercising and on first rising in the morning. Climbing stairs becomes difficult if not impossible. Some dogs will limp and are less willing to participate in normal daily activities, including walks they formerly enjoyed.

Prevention

It appears that the amount of calories a dog consumes, especially during its fast-growth period from three to ten months, has the biggest impact on whether or not a dog genetically prone to hip dysplasia will develop the disease.

Obesity can increase the severity of the disease in dogs that are genetically susceptible and the extra weight will intensify the degeneration of a dog’s joints and hips. Dogs who are genetically prone to hip dysplasia and also are overweight, are at a much higher risk of developing hip dysplasia and eventually osteoarthritis.

Exercise can be another risk factor. Dogs genetically susceptible to hip dysplasia may have an increased incidence of the disease if they are over-exercised at a young age. Moderate exercise like running and swimming is best for exercising young dogs.

Because hip dysplasia in Bulldogs is primarily an inherited condition, there are no products that can prevent its development.

Through proper diet and exercise, you can slow, and sometimes halt, the progression of these degenerative joint diseases while providing your dog with relief from its pain.

There are different assumptions on how to prevent the progression of hip dysplasia in Bulldogs.

Poor nutrition, inadequate or improper exercise, and increased body weight may all contribute to the severity of osteoarthritis after the hip dysplasia has developed.

Watching the calories your puppy or young dog consumes and preventing obesity in your dog, allowing only non-stressful types of exercise, and a daily regimen of Winston’s Joint System, are the best things you can do for your dog.

Since 1990, Winston’s Joint System and Winston’s Pain Formula have helped heal over twenty thousand dogs from all over the world. Our staff specializes in hip dysplasia, arthritis and all joint, pain and mobility issues.

There is an excellent chance we can help your dog, so please contact us at: www.dogshealth.com or call our toll free number at 888-901-5557.

Hip Dysplasia in Irish Setters

Hip Dysplasia in Irish Setters would seem to be an anomaly given their boisterous and energetic demeanor.

They want to be involved in everything you do and everywhere you go, whether indoors or out. They are known for being good-natured and friendly with children.

Irish Setters

Irish Setters will form a strong bond with their owners but they are also gentle and accepting of just about everyone, including other pets.

They do have a loud bark, but they cannot be considered watchdogs or guard dogs. Strangers who come to your house will most likely be looked upon as new playmates by your companion.

Irish Setters were originally bred for hunting in the fields and are full of energy, swiftness and endurance.

If you like to jog, run, or bicycle, your Irish Setter will be happy to accompany you for as long as you wish. Your energy is likely to give out before theirs.

They have a rambunctious personality that’s almost puppy-like, so they will benefit greatly from strong, positive training. They love having a big back yard to play in and need healthy doses of exercise and attention; but they don’t like to be left alone for long periods of time.

Irish Setters were bred by mixing Irish Terriers, Irish Water Spaniels and English Setters to be the ideal birding dog. In the early 1800s, the solid-red Irish setter became the commonly accepted type for the breed.

With the instincts of a great hunter, the magnificence of a show dog and a charming personality, the Irish Setter is one of the world’s favorite dogs.

Irish Setters have balanced and graceful bodies and silky red coats that grow long on the ears, tails and chests. Their lean heads have long muzzles, almond shaped eyes, dark noses and long, thin ears. They have elegant necks that slope down to deep chests and flat backs. Their red coats range in color from chestnut to mahogany.

Irish Setters can live as long as 15 years. Common health issues can include skin allergies, eye problems epilepsy, bloating, and hip dysplasia.

Hip Dysplasia in Irish Setters

Hip dysplasia is a genetic disease that primarily affects large and giant breeds of dogs but can also affect medium-sized breeds and occasionally small breeds. It is primarily a disease of purebreds, although it can also occur in mixed breeds.

To understand hip dysplasia in Irish Setters and the resulting arthritis, you need a basic understanding of how the dog’s hip joint is affected.

The hip joint is comprised of a ball and socket that forms the attachment of the hind leg to the body. The ball portion is the head of the femur and the socket is located on the pelvis.

In a normal hip joint the ball rotates freely within the socket. The bones are shaped to perfectly match each other with the socket surrounding the ball.

To strengthen the joint, the two bones are held together by a strong ligament. The joint capsule, a strong band of connective tissue, circles the two bones to provide added stability.

A normal hip joint:

Hip dysplasia is linked to abnormal joint structure and a laxity of the muscles, connective tissue, and ligaments that would normally support the dog’s hip joints.

As the disease progresses, the articular surfaces of the two bones lose contact with each other. This separation of the two bones within the joint causes a drastic change in the size and shape of the articular surfaces.

An abnormal hip joint:

Most Setters who eventually develop hip dysplasia are born with normal hips, but due to their genetic make-up the soft tissues surrounding the joint develop abnormally. This leads to the symptoms associated with hip dysplasia. The disease may affect both hips, or only the right or left hip.

The symptoms of hip dysplasia in Irish Setters cause afflicted dogs to walk or run with an altered gait, similar to a bunny-hop. They begin to resist any movement that requires full extension or flexion of the rear legs. They will experience stiffness and pain in their rear legs after exercising and on first rising in the morning. Climbing stairs becomes difficult if not impossible. Some dogs will limp and are less willing to participate in normal daily activities, including walks they formerly enjoyed.

It appears that the amount of calories a dog consumes, especially during its fast-growth period from three to ten months, has the biggest impact on whether or not a dog genetically prone to hip dysplasia will develop the disease.

Obesity can increase the severity of the disease in dogs that are genetically susceptible and the extra weight will intensify the degeneration of a dog’s joints and hips. Dogs who are genetically prone to hip dysplasia and also are overweight, are at a much higher risk of developing hip dysplasia and eventually osteoarthritis.

Exercise can be another risk factor. Dogs genetically susceptible to hip dysplasia may have an increased incidence of the disease if they are over-exercised at a young age. Moderate exercise like running and swimming is best for exercising young dogs.

Prevention

Because hip dysplasia in Irish Setters is primarily an inherited condition, there are no products that can prevent its development.

Through proper diet, exercise, and a daily regimen of Winston’s Joint System, you can slow, and sometimes halt, the progression of these degenerative joint diseases while providing your dog with relief from its pain. Winston’s provides many of the raw materials essential for the synthesis of the joint-lubricating synovial fluid as well as the repair of articular cartilage and connective tissue.

You might also want to consider providing your dog with an orthopedic bed which distributes the dog’s weight evenly and reduces pressure on its joints. It’s perfect for dogs with hip dysplasia or arthritis.

If owners insisted on only purchasing an animal whose parents and grandparents were certified to have good or excellent hips, and if breeders only bred these first-rate animals, then the majority of the problems caused by hip dysplasia would be eliminated.

If you are looking to purchase an Irish Setter now or in the future, the best way to lessen the possibility of getting a dog that will develop hip dysplasia is to examine the incidence of the disease in the dog’s lineage. If at all possible, try to examine the parents and grandparents as far back as three or four generations.

There are different assumptions on how to prevent the progression of hip dysplasia in Irish Setters.

Poor nutrition, inadequate or improper exercise, and increased body weight may all contribute to the severity of osteoarthritis after the hip dysplasia has developed. Watching the calories your puppy or young dog consumes and preventing obesity in your dog, allowing only non-stressful types of exercise, and a daily regimen of Winston’s Joint System, are the best things you can do for your dog.

Since 1990, Winston’s Joint System and Winston’s Pain Formula have helped heal over twenty thousand dogs from all over the world. Our staff specializes in hip dysplasia, arthritis and all joint, pain and mobility issues.

There is an excellent chance we can help your dog, so please contact us at: www.dogshealth.com or call our toll free number at 888-901-5557.

Hip Dysplasia in Akitas

Hip dysplasia in Akitas is a common health issue. As an Akita ages it’s important to watch for any symptoms of hip dysplasia or arthritis. An early diagnosis and treatment will do wonders for your loving pet.

The Akitas

Akitas have a reputation for being aggressive hunters in the wild, yet as home pets they are tame and gentle, adapting easily to a quiet family life.

That doesn’t necessarily mean they’ll cuddle up on the sofa and watch TV with you; their instinctive nature tends to keep them alert and responsive to any possible danger.

Who hasn’t loved Hachiko, the Akita from the 2009 movie “Hachi: A Dog’s Tale“? Akitas make loving, faithful, dependable companions and they get along very well with children.

They can be a little aloof with people they don’t know, but they eventually warm up to new people and situations. They don’t bark a lot which is good for apartment dwellers, but they’re very intelligent and responsive, making them first-rate guard dogs.

Think of them as tough, smart and loyal companions.

Akitas are made for outdoor sports whether it’s hiking, hunting, playing games, or jumping in rivers and lakes. They have weatherproof coats that keep them warm in cold temperatures.

An Akita needs ample daily exercise to maintain its physical health and sharp mind. Akitas who live in urban dwellings need a vigorous walk or jog every day, while those who live in a rural setting will do well with daily runs around the property.

In addition to their boundless physical strength, Akitas also have dominant personalities and need an owner who can devote the time and patience to train them properly.

Akitas have large, sturdy frames covered in thick, water-resistant coats that shed a lot in the spring and fall. Daily brushing becomes a must.

They have broad heads with short muzzles, black noses and pointed ears that face forward. Their triangular eyes are dark and deeply set. Their bodies are slightly longer than they are tall, and their thick coats come in black, gray, tan, and brown, all with white markings.

A healthy Akita can live as long as 12 years. Common health issues include immune deficiencies, eye problems, thyroid problems, and hip dysplasia.

Hip dysplasia in Akitas

Hip dysplasia is a genetic disease that primarily affects large and giant breeds of dogs but can also affect medium-sized breeds and occasionally small breeds. It is primarily a disease of purebreds, although it can also occur in mixed breeds.

To understand hip dysplasia in Akitas and the resulting arthritis, you need a basic understanding of how the dog’s hip joint is affected.

The hip joint is comprised of a ball and socket that forms the attachment of the hind leg to the body. The ball portion is the head of the femur and the socket is located on the pelvis.

In a normal hip joint the ball rotates freely within the socket. The bones are shaped to perfectly match each other with the socket surrounding the ball.

To strengthen the joint, the two bones are held together by a strong ligament. The joint capsule, a strong band of connective tissue, circles the two bones to provide added stability.

A normal hip joint:

Hip dysplasia is linked to abnormal joint structure and a laxity of the muscles, connective tissue, and ligaments that would normally support the dog’s hip joints.

As the disease progresses, the articular surfaces of the two bones lose contact with each other. This separation of the two bones within the joint causes a drastic change in the size and shape of the articular surfaces.

An abnormal hip joint:

Most Akitas who eventually develop hip dysplasia are born with normal hips, but due to their genetic make-up the soft tissues surrounding the joint develop abnormally. This leads to the symptoms associated with hip dysplasia. The disease may affect both hips, or only the right or left hip.

The symptoms of hip dysplasia cause afflicted dogs to walk or run with an altered gait, similar to a bunny-hop.

They begin to resist any movement that requires full extension or flexion of the rear legs. They will experience stiffness and pain in their rear legs after exercising and on first rising in the morning. Climbing stairs becomes difficult if not impossible. Some dogs will limp and are less willing to participate in normal daily activities, including walks they formerly enjoyed.

It appears that the amount of calories a dog consumes, especially during its fast-growth period from three to ten months, has the biggest impact on whether or not a dog genetically prone to hip dysplasia will develop the disease.

Obesity can increase the severity of the disease in dogs that are genetically susceptible and the extra weight will intensify the degeneration of a dog’s joints and hips. Dogs who are genetically prone to hip dysplasia and also are overweight, are at a much higher risk of developing hip dysplasia and eventually osteoarthritis.

Exercise can be another risk factor. Dogs genetically susceptible to hip dysplasia may have an increased incidence of the disease if they are over-exercised at a young age. Moderate exercise like running and swimming is best for exercising young dogs.

Prevention

Because hip dysplasia in Akitas is primarily an inherited condition, there are no products that can prevent its development.

Through proper diet, exercise, and a daily regimen of Winston’s Joint System, you can slow, and sometimes halt, the progression of these degenerative joint diseases while providing your dog with relief from its pain. Winston’s provides many of the raw materials essential for the synthesis of the joint-lubricating synovial fluid as well as the repair of articular cartilage and connective tissue.

There are different assumptions on how to prevent the progression of hip dysplasia.

Poor nutrition, inadequate or improper exercise, and increased body weight may all contribute to the severity of osteoarthritis after the hip dysplasia has developed.

Watching the calories your puppy or young dog consumes and preventing obesity in your dog, allowing only non-stressful types of exercise, and a daily regimen of Winston’s Joint System, are the best things you can do for your dog.

Since 1990, Winston’s Joint System and Winston’s Pain Formula have helped heal over twenty thousand dogs from all over the world. Our staff specializes in hip dysplasia, arthritis and all joint, pain and mobility issues.

There is an excellent chance we can help your dog, so please contact us at: www.dogshealth.com or call our toll free number at 888-901-5557.

Hip Dysplasia in Airedale Terriers

If you are considering the adoption of a pet dog and are leaning toward an Airedale Terrier, you need to know the facts on hip dysplasia in Airedale Terriers.

Airedale Terriers

Airedale Terriers make ideal companions for active adults and families with older children. Airedales are friendly, strong, high-energy dogs, handsome and huggable. They aren’t couch potatoes and can remain still and relaxed only for short periods of time. They have loads of energy and love to run, play, fetch and dig holes in your yard.

If you enjoy hiking, hunting, or running, your Airedale Terrier will keep pace with you the entire distance. Airedales make wonderful companions for someone who is active and enjoys exercising with a dog. They’re very responsive to obedience training but can be easily distracted by the sudden appearance of small animals such as cats or squirrels.

Airedales are dependable watchdogs, protective and loyal. They have a piercing bark and lots of acrobatic moves. As puppies they are quite rowdy but mellow some with age—but not that much. They are sweet animals and need lots of love and attention.

Airedales are courageous, intense and extremely curious about other dogs and small animals and need to be kept on a leash in public. They love daily walks and games of fetch, and they are accomplished swimmers.

A healthy Airedale Terrier can live as long as 12 years. These dogs are generally healthy, but some can develop hip dysplasia.

Airedales are named for the valley (dale) of Aire in England, and were bred from hunting and swimming terriers for the purpose of catching otters and other small animals, in addition to curbing the rat population. Airedales are often used as police and military dogs.

Airedale Terriers have large, lean and well-proportioned frames covered in bristly, wiry coats. Their long, flat heads are somewhat narrow with small, dark eyes and V-shaped ears that fold forward. They are usually groomed to have bushy, hanging ears. They have strong necks that slope down to deep chests, short backs and tails that point straight up. Their coats are usually tan with black and/or red markings.

Hip dysplasia in Airedale Terriers

Hip dysplasia is a genetic disease that primarily affects large and giant breeds of dogs but can also affect medium-sized breeds and occasionally small breeds. It is primarily a disease of purebreds, although it can also occur in mixed breeds.

To understand hip dysplasia in Airedale Terriers and the resulting arthritis, you need a basic understanding of how the dog’s hip joint is affected.

The hip joint is comprised of a ball and socket that forms the attachment of the hind leg to the body. The ball portion is the head of the femur and the socket is located on the pelvis. In a normal hip joint the ball rotates freely within the socket. The bones are shaped to perfectly match each other with the socket surrounding the ball. To strengthen the joint, the two bones are held together by a strong ligament. The joint capsule, a strong band of connective tissue, circles the two bones to provide added stability.

Hip dysplasia is linked to abnormal joint structure and a laxity of the muscles, connective tissue, and ligaments that would normally support the dog’s hip joints.

As the disease progresses, the articular surfaces of the two bones lose contact with each other. This separation of the two bones within the joint causes a drastic change in the size and shape of the articular surfaces.

This is what a normal hip joint looks like:

Most Airedales who eventually develop hip dysplasia are born with normal hips, but due to their genetic make-up the soft tissues surrounding the joint develop abnormally. This leads to the symptoms associated with hip dysplasia. The disease may affect both hips, or only the right or left hip.

This is what an abnormal hip joint looks like:

The symptoms of hip dysplasia in Airedale Terriers cause afflicted dogs to walk or run with an altered gait, similar to a bunny-hop. They begin to resist any movement that requires full extension or flexion of the rear legs. They will experience stiffness and pain in their rear legs after exercising and on first rising in the morning. Climbing stairs becomes difficult if not impossible. Some dogs will limp and are less willing to participate in normal daily activities, including walks they formerly enjoyed.

It appears that the amount of calories a dog consumes, especially during its fast-growth period from three to ten months, has the biggest impact on whether or not a dog genetically prone to hip dysplasia will develop the disease.

Obesity can increase the severity of the disease in dogs that are genetically susceptible and the extra weight will intensify the degeneration of a dog’s joints and hips. Dogs who are genetically prone to hip dysplasia and also are overweight, are at a much higher risk of developing hip dysplasia and eventually osteoarthritis.

Exercise can be another risk factor. Dogs genetically susceptible to hip dysplasia may have an increased incidence of the disease if they are over-exercised at a young age. Moderate exercise like running and swimming is best for exercising young dogs.

Prevention

Because hip dysplasia is primarily an inherited condition, there are no products that can prevent its development.

Through proper diet, exercise, and a daily regimen of Winston’s Joint System, you can slow, and sometimes halt, the progression of these degenerative joint diseases while providing your dog with relief from its pain. Winston’s provides many of the raw materials essential for the synthesis of the joint-lubricating synovial fluid as well as the repair of articular cartilage and connective tissue.

You might also want to consider providing your dog with an orthopedic bed which distributes the dog’s weight evenly and reduces pressure on its joints. It’s perfect for dogs with hip dysplasia or arthritis.

There are different assumptions on how to prevent the progression of hip dysplasia in Airedale Terriers.

Poor nutrition, inadequate or improper exercise, and increased body weight may all contribute to the severity of osteoarthritis after the hip dysplasia has developed. By watching the calories your puppy or young dog consumes and thereby preventing obesity in your dog, allowing only non-stressful types of exercise, and feeding your dog a daily regimen of Winston’s Joint System, are the best things you can do for your Airedale.

Since 1990, Winston’s Joint System and Winston’s Pain Formula have helped heal over twenty thousand dogs from all over the world. Our staff specializes in hip dysplasia, arthritis and all joint, pain and mobility issues.

There is an excellent chance we can help your dog, so please contact us at: www.dogshealth.com or call our toll free number at 888-901-5557.

Hip Dysplasia in Saint Bernards

Saint Bernard dogs are powerful, proportionately tall, strong and muscular, big boned and deep chested, and for these reasons you would think that hip dysplasia in Saint Bernards would be something extremely rare. The truth is, it’s the other way around: Joint problems are very common for dogs of this breed.

Saint Bernards

Known as the giant dogs that rescue people in the Swiss Alps, Saint Bernards are much loved as gentle family dogs with big hearts and friendly temperaments.

Before you decide to bring one into your family you should be aware that they require as much love and devotion as they give in return. Their size alone dictates the need for basic manners and early obedience training. The fact that they can rest their heads on something as tall as your kitchen table requires that they be taught their limits.

Although they love to be with the family children, their sheer size requires close supervision. They would never intentionally harm a small child but a huge paw or strong tail can accidentally knock a child over.

They are enthusiastic participants in any family activity, and will sulk if not included. They seldom bark without good reason, making them good watchdogs and protectors of their family, but they should never be considered guard dogs.

Despite their large size and tendency to physically grow very quickly, Saint Bernards generally are slow to mature mentally, and their training should be undertaken with a gentle but firm hand, and a good deal of patience and consistency. A well-trained Saint is a wonderful dog to have and they love to please their human owners.

Because they are slow to mature, Saints should not be pushed too rapidly into formal and serious training. Their giant sized bones don’t finish growing until they are two years of age. Activities as simple as jumping in and out of an SUV or pickup truck can permanently damage their soft bones. For this reason, a Saint Bernard should not be pushed into jumping or pulling heavy loads before two years of age.

Saint Bernard puppies grow at a phenomenal rate during the first year of life, increasing in size an average of three pounds per week. They eat somewhere between 6 and 12 cups of dog food per day. They should never be fed high protein puppy food, but instead should be fed an adult formula containing 22-26% protein. Puppy foods containing too much protein can cause the fast growing puppy to grown even faster, and subject it to any number of bone problems.

A Saint Bernard will not “eat you out of house and home.” Saint Bernards can be raised and maintained on the same amount of food required for other large breeds. Since they are basically placid dogs, they generally require less food per pound of body weight than most smaller, more active breeds.

Hip dysplasia in Saint Bernards

Because of their large size, hip dysplasia in Saint Bernards is a common health issue.

Hip Dysplasia is an abnormal development of the hip causing excessive wear of the joint cartilage during weight bearing, eventually leading to the development of arthritis, often called degenerative joint disease or osteoarthritis.

Some of the symptoms and signs of hip dysplasia in Saint Bernards are:

  • Moving more slowly
  • Difficulty getting up and lying down
  • Weight shift to another leg
  • Personality change
  • Reluctance to walk, jump or play
  • Refusing to use stairs or get in the car
  • Change in appetite
  • Change in behavior
  • Muscle atrophy
  • Yelping when touched
  • Limping

Treatment

When a Great Dane is diagnosed with hip dysplasia and the choices for treatment seem limited to expensive surgery or questionable drugs, I recommend you begin treating your dog with Winston’s Joint System.

Winston’s Joint System has a history of successful treatment of Saint Bernards suffering from hip dysplasia and arthritis. This formula is a combination of three natural whole food supplements developed by a Naturopathic Doctor for his own dog and contains no drugs and has no side-effects because it’s just good whole food.

If you’re the proud owner of a noble Saint Bernard and your dog is displaying signs or symptoms of hip dysplasia, see your vet as soon as possible and get a complete examination. Discovering this disease in its early stages and putting your Saint on a regimen of Winston’s Joint System can mean a longer, happier, pain-free life for your pet.

Since 1990, Winston’s Joint System and Winston’s Pain Formula have helped heal over twenty thousand dogs from all over the world. Our staff specializes in hip dysplasia, arthritis and all joint, pain and mobility issues.

There is an excellent chance we can help your dog, so please contact us at: www.dogshealth.com or call our toll free number at 888-901-5557.

Hip Dysplasia in Border Collies

Border Collies are a breed of dog known for their very active lifestyle. Sadly, hip dysplasia in Border Collies is not a rare occurrence, and the more you know about hip dysplasia, the better you will be prepared to watch your pet for any signs of this debilitating disease.

Border Collies

Border Collies are loyal, easily trainable, intelligent dogs with natural energetic personalities. They require a lot of room to run around in, making them better suited to living on a farm or ranch where they can expend their surplus energy. They are not really suited for living indoors, especially in an apartment. These dogs are meant to work and play outdoors in wide-open spaces.

They form a strong bond with their owners but can be unfriendly to strangers, making them good dogs for guarding your house and property. They are not “attack dogs” but they will certainly let you know if a stranger approaches your house.

Border Collies have natural inbred herding instincts and may start “herding” small children or small pets in your household. They are hardy, high-strung dogs with a determined drive. If you’re a person who likes to play sporting games with your dog, you’ll love Border Collies.

But if you’re just looking for a calm, friendly family pet, a Border Collie probably isn’t the ideal choice. They are demanding dogs that need a lot of attention, ample outdoor exercise and a task like herding sheep, goats, or whatever animal (or person) it feels is in need of herding!

Border Collies also like receiving direction. They require firm leadership from an owner who has the time and patience to follow through with obedience lessons and training. They will dominate a weak-willed owner, so it’s very important that a Border Collie understands who’s boss around the house. Severe punishment or harsh treatment for infractions or disobedience are not recommended because they can cause negative reactions in Border Collies, whereas positive reinforcement helps them.

Border Collies are medium-sized dogs with a light frame, long hair, and athletic bodies that are strong and agile. The typical Border Collie has a slightly wide head with a tapered muzzle, half-perked ears and dark, oval eyes. The long tail sometimes raises but never curls over the back. Their coats are usually sleek and their coat colors are solid black, black and white, black and gray, or red and white.

A healthy Border Collie can live as long as 15 years. Common health problems include deafness, epilepsy, and hip dysplasia.

Hip dysplasia in Border Collies

Hip dysplasia is a genetic disease that primarily affects large and giant breeds of dogs but can also affect medium-sized breeds and occasionally small breeds. It is primarily a disease of purebreds, although it can also occur in mixed breeds.

To understand hip dysplasia and resulting arthritis, you need a basic understanding of how the dog’s hip joint is affected. The hip joint is comprised of a ball and socket that forms the attachment of the hind leg to the body. The ball portion is the head of the femur and the socket is located on the pelvis. In a normal hip joint, the ball rotates freely within the socket. The bones are shaped to perfectly match each other with the socket surrounding the ball. To strengthen the joint, the two bones are held together by a strong ligament. The joint capsule, a strong band of connective tissue, circles the two bones to provide added stability.

This is a normal hip joint:


Hip dysplasia is linked to abnormal joint structure and a laxity of the muscles, connective tissue, and ligaments that would normally support the dog’s hip joints. As the disease progresses, the articular surfaces of the two bones lose contact with each other. This separation of the two bones within the joint causes a drastic change in the size and shape of the articular surfaces.

This is an abnormal hip joint:

Most dogs who eventually develop hip dysplasia are born with normal hips, but due to their genetic make-up the soft tissues surrounding the joint develop abnormally. This leads to the symptoms associated with hip dysplasia. The disease may affect both hips, or only the right or left hip.

Hip dysplasia in Border Collies causes afflicted dogs to walk or run with an altered gait, similar to a bunny-hop. They begin to resist any movement that requires full extension or flexion of the rear legs. They will experience stiffness and pain in their rear legs after exercising and on first rising in the morning. Climbing stairs becomes difficult if not impossible. Some dogs will limp and are less willing to participate in normal daily activities, including walks they formerly enjoyed.

It appears that the amount of calories a dog consumes, especially during its fast-growth period from three to ten months, has the biggest impact on whether or not a dog genetically prone to hip dysplasia will develop the disease.

Obesity can increase the severity of the disease in dogs that are genetically susceptible and the extra weight will intensify the degeneration of a dog’s joints and hips. Dogs who are genetically prone to hip dysplasia and also are overweight, are at a much higher risk of developing hip dysplasia and eventually osteoarthritis.

Exercise can be another risk factor. Dogs genetically susceptible to hip dysplasia may have an increased incidence of the disease if they are over-exercised at a young age. Moderate exercise like running and swimming is best for exercising young dogs.

Prevention

Because hip dysplasia is primarily an inherited condition in Border Collies, there are no products that can prevent its development. Through proper diet, exercise, and a daily regimen of Winston’s Joint System, you can slow, and sometimes halt, the progression of these degenerative joint diseases while providing your dog with relief from its pain. Winston’s provides many of the raw materials essential for the synthesis of the joint-lubricating synovial fluid as well as the repair of articular cartilage and connective tissue.

There are different assumptions on how to prevent the progression of hip dysplasia in Border Collies. Poor nutrition, inadequate or improper exercise, and increased body weight may all contribute to the severity of osteoarthritis after the hip dysplasia has developed. By watching the calories your puppy or young dog consumes and preventing obesity in your dog, allowing only non-stressful types of exercise, and a daily regimen of Winston’s Joint System, are the best things you can do for your dog.

Since 1990, Winston’s Joint System and Winston’s Pain Formula have helped heal over twenty thousand dogs from all over the world. Our staff specializes in hip dysplasia, arthritis and all joint, pain and mobility issues.

There is an excellent chance we can help your dog, so please contact us or call our toll free number at 888-901-5557.

Hip Dysplasia in Giant Schnauzers

Giant Schnauzers were bred for tasks such as herding and cattle driving. The breed was created by crossing Standard Schnauzers with bigger dogs like Great Danes. This interbreeding with Great Danes who were susceptible to hip problems was responsible for introducing hip dysplasia in Giant Schnauzers.

Giant Schnauzers

Giant Schnauzers are devoted and protective dogs with a high-energy level. They are bigger and bolder than their smaller cousins, the Standard Schnauzer, but are just as lively and frisky.

They are clever and trainable pets but need lots of attention and guidance combined with ample playtime and obedience exercises.

Giant Schnauzers make very attentive companions, preferring to stay very close to their owners (which can be a bit unnerving to some people when a dog this large seems intent on watching every move they make). They are affectionate and love to be involved in all the activities that take place in the home.

Giant Schnauzers make excellent watchdogs. Their intense loyalty to their family and their commanding presence makes them a fearless guard dog, able to easily distinguish between friend and enemy. They won’t bark randomly or unnecessarily, but they will bark loudly and forcefully when they sense threats to their family or themselves.

Giants need lots of outdoor exercise; vigorous daily walks or long jogs help them maintain their strong physical and mental health. They always need to be walked on a leash because they have strong hunting instincts, and any small creatures —whether birds or cats— easily excite them.

While the Miniature Schnauzer and Standard Schnauzer were originally bred to chase and kill rats, their Giant cousin was meant for bigger tasks such as herding, and even —believe it or not— for barroom bouncing. The breed originated in Germany. It was created by crossing Standard Schnauzers with much bigger dogs like Great Danes and they do extremely well handling a wide range of tasks, including cattle driving and police work.

Giant Schnauzers are basically larger, stronger versions of the Standard Schnauzer and have a large, square-built body structure with dense, wiry coats. Their long heads have distinctive bushy beards, mustaches and eyebrows, and deeply set eyes, powerful muzzles and V-shaped ears that point up and forward. Their tails, which some owners choose to dock, are carried high. They come in solid black and salt & pepper colors.

A healthy Giant can live as long as 15 years. As they age they are prone to developing hip dysplasia and arthritis. Other common health issues include eye disease and autoimmune thyroiditis.

Hip dysplasia in Giant Schnauzers

Hip dysplasia is a genetic disease that primarily affects large and giant breeds of dogs (like the Giant Schnauzer) but can also affect medium-sized breeds and occasionally small breeds. It is primarily a disease of purebreds, although it can also occur in mixed breeds.

To understand hip dysplasia in Giant Schnauzers and the resulting arthritis, you need a basic understanding of how the dog’s hip joint is affected.

The hip joint is comprised of a ball and socket that forms the attachment of the hind leg to the body. The ball portion is the head of the femur and the socket is located on the pelvis.

In a normal hip joint the ball rotates freely within the socket. The bones are shaped to perfectly match each other with the socket surrounding the ball. To strengthen the joint, the two bones are held together by a strong ligament. The joint capsule, a strong band of connective tissue, circles the two bones to provide added stability.

This is what a normal hip joint looks like in an X-ray:

Hip dysplasia is linked to abnormal joint structure and a laxity of the muscles, connective tissue, and ligaments that would normally support the dog’s hip joints.

As the disease progresses, the articular surfaces of the two bones lose contact with each other. This separation of the two bones within the joint causes a drastic change in the size and shape of the articular surfaces.

This is what the same joint looks like when a dog has hip dysplasia:

Most Giant Schnauzers who eventually develop hip dysplasia are born with normal hips, but due to their genetic make-up the soft tissues surrounding the joint develop abnormally. This leads to the symptoms associated with hip dysplasia. The disease may affect both hips, or only the right or left hip.

The symptoms of hip dysplasia in Giant Schnauzers cause afflicted dogs to walk or run with an altered gait, similar to a bunny-hop. They begin to resist any movement that requires full extension or flexion of the rear legs.

They will experience stiffness and pain in their rear legs after exercising and on first rising in the morning. Climbing stairs becomes difficult if not impossible. Some dogs will limp and are less willing to participate in normal daily activities, including walks they formerly enjoyed.

It appears that the amount of calories a dog consumes, especially during its fast-growth period from three to ten months, has the biggest impact on whether or not a dog genetically prone to hip dysplasia will develop the disease.

Obesity can increase the severity of the disease in dogs that are genetically susceptible and the extra weight will intensify the degeneration of a dog’s joints and hips. Dogs who are genetically prone to hip dysplasia and also are overweight, are at a much higher risk of developing hip dysplasia and eventually osteoarthritis.

Exercise can be another risk factor. Dogs genetically susceptible to hip dysplasia like Giant Schnauzers may have an increased incidence of the disease if they are over-exercised at a young age. Moderate exercise like running and swimming is best for exercising young dogs.

Prevention

Because hip dysplasia is primarily an inherited condition, there are no products that can prevent its development.

Through proper diet, exercise, and a daily regimen of Winston’s Joint System, you can slow, and sometimes halt, the progression of these degenerative joint diseases while providing your dog with relief from its pain. Winston’s provides many of the raw materials essential for the synthesis of the joint-lubricating synovial fluid as well as the repair of articular cartilage and connective tissue.

If owners insisted on only purchasing an animal whose parents and grandparents were certified to have good or excellent hips, and if breeders only bred these first-rate animals, then the majority of the problems caused by hip dysplasia would be eliminated.

If you are looking to purchase a Giant Schnauzer now or in the future, the best way to lessen the possibility of getting a dog that will develop hip dysplasia is to examine the incidence of the disease in the dog’s lineage. If at all possible, try to examine the parents and grandparents as far back as three or four generations.

There are different assumptions on how to prevent the progression of hip dysplasia in Giant Schnauzers.

Poor nutrition, inadequate or improper exercise, and increased body weight may all contribute to the severity of osteoarthritis after the hip dysplasia has developed. Watching the calories your puppy or young dog consumes and preventing obesity in your dog, allowing only non-stressful types of exercise, and a daily regimen of Winston’s Joint System, are the best things you can do for your dog.

Since 1990, Winston’s Joint System and Winston’s Pain Formula have helped heal over twenty thousand dogs from all over the world. Our staff specializes in hip dysplasia, arthritis and all joint, pain and mobility issues.

There is an excellent chance we can help your dog, so please contact us at: www.dogshealth.com or call our toll free number at 888-901-5557.