Hip Dysplasia in Doberman Pinschers

Canine hip dysplasia in Doberman Pinschers is a serious health problem affecting all ages of Dobermans.

Doberman Pinschers

Doberman Pinschers are considered by their owners to be reliable family pets. Dobermans were first bred in Germany to serve as guard dogs. Once known to be a very aggressive breed, the Doberman’s temperament has improved through breeding over the years and is now considered a generally non-aggressive dog.

The Doberman’s powerful, muscular build gives it speed, elegance, strength, and endurance. Its posture is alert and proud, and its gait is fast. Dobermans come in a color range of black, blue, fawn, red, and a light yellowish brown. Above each eye are rust-colored markings which also appear on the muzzle, throat and chest, below the tail, and on all four legs and feet. The Doberman has a smooth, short coat with neat lines and a white patch on its chest.

Dobermans are adventurous and loyal companions. They make talented and obedient students when they are being trained. They are usually sensitive and responsive to an owner’s commands, but they can also be dominating and overbearing. The breed is usually shy with strangers, but become aggressive with strange dogs. Owners who choose a Doberman usually do so for their alertness and ability to protect their owners from possible harm.

Dobermans require mental and physical exercise daily or they can become destructive or frustrated. A walk on a leash, a run in an enclosed area, or a long jog generally satisfies their need for activity. Dobermans are most useful indoors as a guardian and a family companion. Their coats require minimal care which means you don’t have to worry about shedding hair all over the house and the furniture.

The history of Doberman Pinschers is very interesting. A German tax collector named Louis Dobermann is credited for the breeding the first Doberman Pinscher. He was searching for an attentive guard dog to accompany him on his rounds, and in the late 19th century he began to experiment by crossing the German shorthaired shepherd and the German Pinscher.

The original Dobermans had round heads and heavy-boned bodies, but breeders soon began to develop a more robust-looking dog. Over time, the breed evolved and by 1899, the National Dobermann Pinscher Club was created in Germany.

The first Doberman Pinscher was brought to the United States in 1908. Utilized as a guard dog, police dog and a war dog, the Doberman’s qualities made it a favorite as a family bodyguard. In 1977, the Doberman became the second most popular breed in the United States. Since then, the breed has kept its well-regarded status as both a guard dog and a family pet.

Doberman Pinschers have a lifespan of 10 to 12 years.

Wobbler’s syndrome, cervical vertebral instability (CVI), and cardiomyopathy are some serious health problems affecting Dobermans, as well as canine hip dysplasia.

Hip dysplasia in Doberman Pinschers

Symptoms of hip dysplasia in Doberman Pinschers include moving more slowly, difficulty in getting up or lying down, reluctance to walk, jump or play, refusing to use stairs or get into the car, muscle atrophy, limping, yelping when touched, changes in appetite, and personality changes.

Dobermans who develop hip dysplasia, arthritis or osteochondrosis (OCD), suffer from pain and stiffness in their joints, and their ability to live a quality life and remain active is greatly diminished.

Treatment & Prevention

When a Doberman is diagnosed with hip dysplasia and the choices for treatment seem limited to expensive surgery or questionable drugs, we recommend you begin treating your dog with Winston’s Joint System, an all-natural formula developed by a Naturopathic Doctor to heal his own beloved dog. This proven formula has been giving relief from pain and stiffness to all breeds and ages of dogs for more than 20 years.

Because hip dysplasia is primarily an inherited condition in Dobermans, there are no products that can prevent its development, however, you can slow, and sometimes halt, the progression of the disease.

There are different assumptions on how to prevent the progression of hip dysplasia in Doberman Pinschers. Poor nutrition, inadequate or improper exercise, and increased body weight may all contribute to the severity of osteoarthritis after the hip dysplasia has developed.

By watching the calories your puppy or young dog consumes and preventing obesity in your dog, allowing only non-stressful types of exercise, and a daily regimen of Winston’s Joint System, are the best things you can do for your dog.

Since 1990, Winston’s Joint System and Winston’s Pain Formula have helped heal over twenty thousand dogs from all over the world. Our staff specializes in hip dysplasia, arthritis and all joint, pain and mobility issues.

There is an excellent chance we can help your dog, so please contact us at: www.dogshealth.com or call our toll free number at 888-901-5557.

Hip Dysplasia in Labradors

Hip dysplasia in Labradors is a genetic disease that can cause crippling, lameness and severe arthritic pain in a dog’s joints.

For Labradors that are genetically prone to hip dysplasia, symptoms can occur in puppies that are just a few months old or they can strike later in a dog’s life.

Causes & symptoms of hip dysplasia in Labradors

There are a number of causative factors that determine whether a Labrador will develop hip dysplasia.

The most important being the genetic make-up of the dog (whether its parents and grand-parents had hip dysplasia), the type of diet being fed the dog, and obesity, which puts additional strain and weight on hip joints that become weak from hip dysplasia, arthritis, or osteochondrosis (OCD).

It is not possible to predict when, or even if, hip dysplasia will occur in a dog.

However, there are some easily noticeable symptoms of hip dysplasia which include moving more slowly, difficulty in getting up or lying down, reluctance to walk, jump or play, refusing to use stairs or get into the car, muscle atrophy, limping, yelping when touched, changes in appetite, and personality changes.

Labradors who develop hip dysplasia, arthritis or OCD, suffer from pain and stiffness in their joints which greatly diminishes their ability to live a quality life and remain active.

Treatment of hip dysplasia in Labradors

When a Lab is diagnosed with hip dysplasia and the choices for treatment seem limited to expensive surgery or questionable drugs, we recommend you begin treating your dog with Winston’s Joint System, an all-natural formula developed by a Naturopathic Doctor to heal his own beloved dog. This proven formula has been giving relief from pain and stiffness to all breeds and ages of dogs for more than 20 years.

All Labradors have different temperaments, different pain thresholds and different bodies. Some may be able to cope with the pain and discomfort for a long time before showing any signs of hip dysplasia or arthritis.

X-rays are the easiest way to diagnose hip dysplasia in Labradors. A vet will evaluate the joints and take into consideration any symptoms like those listed above because sometimes an x-ray won’t reveal the full extent of the dog’s pain. The vet will also consider the dog’s movements and any evidence of lameness before making a diagnosis.

Although there is no actual cure for canine hip dysplasia, arthritis, or osteochondrosis (OCD), regular treatment with Winston’s Joint System will give immediate and long-term relief without drugs. Winston’s is a combination of three, totally-natural whole food supplements and there are no side-effects because it’s just good whole food. Exercise and weight control are also vitally important. A dog’s weight, together with exercise, helps in the development of cartilage growth and aids in reducing pain and discomfort.

Surgery is normally only considered in cases of Labrador hip dysplasia if all other treatments have failed to improve the dog’s condition. This procedure is expensive and the recovery time for a dog can be considerably lengthened if the post-surgical dog is not cared for properly. The desired result of any surgical procedure is to provide an acceptable quality of life for the Lab, so surgery should be considered only if a vet is reasonably certain of success.

The most successful joint modification surgery involves reshaping or replacing the femur, or realigning the hip socket. This surgery is only recommended for younger dogs. Older and heavier dogs who suffer from hip dysplasia are generally not considered good candidates for the surgery.

There is a fairly high incidence of mortality for older dogs undergoing this procedure and that is something you need to discuss frankly with your vet if surgery is recommended.

Since 1990, Winston’s Joint System and Winston’s Pain Formula have helped heal over twenty thousand dogs from all over the world. Our staff specializes in hip dysplasia, arthritis and all joint, pain and mobility issues.

There is an excellent chance we can help your dog, so please contact us at: www.dogshealth.com or call our toll free number at 888-901-5557.

What Is Hip Dysplasia In Dogs – Causes & Symptoms (Hip Dysplasia In Dogs – Part 1)

This is the first part of our 4-part series “Hip Dysplasia in Dogs”.

In this part we’ll cover what hip dysplasia is, and what the causes and symptoms of hip dysplasia in dogs are.

Hip dysplasia is a disease that seriously affects the hip joint that attaches a dog’s hind leg to its body.

What Is Hip Dysplasia In Dogs - Causes & Symptoms

How the hip joint works

The hip joint is a ball-and-socket joint. The ball portion is the head of the femur (the main bone in the thigh) and the socket is located on the dog’s pelvis.

In a healthy, normal joint the ball rotates freely and easily within the socket. The dog’s bones are shaped to perfectly match each other, with the socket surrounding the ball. In order to strengthen the hip joint, a strong ligament holds the two bones together. This ligament attaches the femur head directly to the socket.

The joint capsule is a very strong band of connective tissue that circles the two bones and provides stability for a dog’s rear legs. In healthy dogs, the area where the bones actually touch each other is smooth and cushioned with a layer of spongy cartilage. The hip joint also contains a thick fluid that keeps the joint lubricated.

In a dog with normal hips, all of these components work together and help the joint function smoothly which supports the dog in maintaining stability.

What is hip dysplasia in dogs?

Hip dysplasia is a result of abnormal joint structure and a slackness of the muscles, the connective tissue, and the ligaments that support the joint.

As a dog’s hip joint continues to deteriorate, the surfaces of the two hip bones begin to separate in the joint and cause structural changes in the bone surfaces. As the cartilage is progressively worn away, the pain becomes intense when the dog stands or walks.

Most dogs are born with normal hips but if their genetic background includes a tendency for hip dysplasia or arthritis, the soft tissues that surround the hip joint will develop abnormally and cause hip dysplasia. The disease can affect both the right and left hips, but more often affects only one side.

Symptoms of hip dysplasia in dogs

Hip dysplasia symptoms are nearly identical to arthritis symptoms which causes a dog to walk or run in a limping or odd way.

A dog may avoid movement that requires fully extending or flexing its rear legs. They will also experience stiffness and pain in their rear legs after exercising or when they first get up in the morning.

Climbing stairs becomes a difficult if not impossible task.

As hip dysplasia progressively worsens, affected dogs will lose most of their muscle tone and may need assistance in getting up after resting in a prone position.

Signs of hip dysplasia in dogs:
If you notice any of the signs below, visit your veterinarian as soon as possible. An early diagnosis, is the key to a successful treatment.

  • Moving more slowly
  • Difficulty in getting up and/or lying down
  • Weight shift from one leg to the other
  • Reluctance to walk, jump or play
  • Refusing to use stairs or get in the car
  • Muscle atrophy
  • Yelping when touched
  • Limping

Also, as with any other illness, be in the lookout for changes in your dog’s personality, behavior and appetite.

Dogs of all ages are subject to hip dysplasia.

Usually hip dysplasia symptoms don’t begin to show up in a dog until the middle or later years of its life, although puppies as young as five or six months may begin to display pain and discomfort during and after exercise.

The condition will usually worsen until all normal activities become too painful for the dog to tolerate. You can help your dog recover its normal life through the use of Winston’s Joint System, an all-natural formula developed by a Naturopathic Doctor to heal his own beloved dog who suffered from hip dysplasia. For more than 30 years this proven formula has been giving relief from pain and stiffness to all breeds and ages of dogs.

Which dog breeds are susceptible to hip dysplasia?

Hip dysplasia is primarily a disease of large breeds like Golden Retrievers, Labrador Retrievers, Saint Bernards, German Shepherds, Rottweilers, and Great Danes. The disease can affect medium-sized breeds also, but rarely affects smaller breeds.

Hip dysplasia is also primarily a disease of purebred dogs but can develop in mixed breeds if their parents were breeds of dogs prone to developing hip dysplasia.

Are there specific risk factors for developing hip dysplasia?

Genes
Hip dysplasia is caused by one of the hip joint bones moving out of place. This creates abnormal wearing away of the joint tissue and cartilage. Arthritis and pain then increase as the dog ages.

It is a genetic disease, meaning if one or both of a dog’s parents has hip dysplasia, then it is at a greater risk for developing the disease. If a dog’s lineage showed no signs of hip problems, then it probably will not develop dysplasia.

Weight
It appears that the amount of calories a dog consumes, especially during its fast-growth period from three to ten months, has the biggest impact on whether or not a dog genetically prone to hip dysplasia will develop the disease.

Obesity can increase the seriousness of hip dysplasia in genetically susceptible dogs. If a dog is genetically prone to hip dysplasia and is also overweight, it has a much higher risk of developing hip dysplasia.

Intense exercise
Exercise can also be factor in developing the disease. Dogs that are genetically predisposed to the disease can have an increased incidence of hip dysplasia if over-exercised when they are young. However, dogs with large leg muscles are less likely to develop hip dysplasia than dogs with small muscles.

Moderate exercise such as running and swimming would be beneficial to a dog, but any exercise that places a lot of pressure on the joints would not be.

Since 1990, Winston’s Joint System and Winston’s Pain Formula have helped heal over twenty thousand dogs from all over the world. Our staff specializes in hip dysplasia, arthritis and all joint, pain and mobility issues.

There is an excellent chance we can help your dog, so please contact us at: www.dogshealth.com or call our toll free number at 888-901-5557.