Rimadyl For Arthritis in Dogs

What is Rimadyl? Rimadyl (generic name: carprofen), is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) used to treat the pain and inflammation of hip dysplasia and arthritis in dogs. Rimadyl provides 24-hour relief from these debilitating diseases by reducing a dog’s hormones that cause the pain and inflammation.

Rimadyl is available in three forms for easy administration of the drug: caplet, chewable or injection. Rimadyl chewable tablets taste like liver, which is tasty to most dogs, so the medication needs to be kept where the dog cannot gain access to it.

Cautions & overdose

Rimadyl overdose symptoms include nausea, vomiting, headache, drowsiness, stomach pain, seizures, or difficulty urinating.

Veterinarians prescribing Rimadyl warn that the drug should not be administered along with aspirin or any other NSAID. It also should not be used when a dog is taking steroids or corticosteroids like prednisone, prednisolone, or dexamethasone.

Rimadyl is not safe for a dog who has kidney or liver disease, or inflammatory bowel disease. A dog should be prescreened by a veterinarian for these diseases before the drug is prescribed.

A dog who is on Rimadyl for a prolonged time should also have its liver and kidney enzymes monitored on a regular basis.

Rimadyl Side-effects

There are side effects associated with Rimadyl. Some are common, and some are rare. Rimadyl has also been traced to the death of some dogs that have taken the medicine.

A dog owner whose pet is being given Rimadyl is advised to watch closely for any of the following symptoms:

  • loss of normal appetite
  • vomiting (sometime stained with blood)
  • diarrhea
  • black, tarry stool
  • unusual lethargy or drowsiness for extended times
  • hyperactivity
  • loss of balance, dizziness or weakness in legs
  • drastic or very unusual changes in eating habits
  • increased aggressive behavior
  • partial paralysis
  • seizures
  • jaundice

Any of these symptoms, especially several at the same time, can be an indication of a very serious problem. If these symptoms occur, stop administering Rimadyl and immediately contact your veterinarian.

Rimadyl Alternatives

If your dog is suffering from arthritis or hip dysplasia, there are safer alternatives to Rimadyl.

Supplements such as glucosamine and chondroitin will work for some dogs, some of the time.

A much more effective treatment for arthritis and hip dysplasia is Winston’s Joint System, an all-natural formula developed by a Naturopathic Doctor to heal his own beloved dog. For over 20 years, this long-proven formula has been providing relief from the pain and stiffness of arthritis and hip dysplasia to all breeds and ages of dogs.

If your pet suffers from any of the following joint problems, I recommend that you try Winston’s Joint System to give your dog welcome relief from its pain:

  • Hip Dysplasia
  • Arthritis
  • Osteochondritis (OCD)
  • Stiffness/Inflammation
  • Ligament Tears
  • Growing Pains
  • Mobility Problems
  • Joint Pains
  • Back/Spinal Problems
  • Hypertrophic Osteodystrophy (HOD)

Rimadyl for arthritis in dogs can be dangerous to an animal’s health. It is much safer for your pet to be placed on a daily regimen of Winston’s Joint System.

Within the first 30 days of treatment, dogs show noticeable and often remarkable improvement. And, unlike drugs such as Rimadyl, Winston’s is safe for any dog.

⇒ Read more about painkillers and the risks of giving Rimadyl for arthritis in dogs

 

Since 1990, Winston’s Joint System and Winston’s Pain Formula have helped heal over twenty thousand dogs from all over the world. Our staff specializes in hip dysplasia, arthritis and all joint, pain and mobility issues.

There is an excellent chance we can help your dog, so please contact us at: www.dogshealth.com or call our toll free number at 888-901-5557.

Car Sickness in Dogs

Many dogs, regardless of breed, can experience carsickness on either short or long trips because they are not able to adjust to the shifting movements and varying speed of your vehicle when riding in your car or truck. Sometimes even a smooth ride on a relatively calm auto trip can upset a dog’s delicate digestive system.

Car (or motion) sickness is caused by an over-stimulation of a dog’s inner ear and it can make a dog feel miserable. But did you know that stress can also make a dog carsick because many dogs associate car travel with an embedded memory, like an unpleasant trip to the vet or being left at a kennel overnight or for a longer period of time where they experienced separation anxiety. Also, if a dog is young and has ever been frightened by a noisy truck or car, he may become stressed when experiencing the same situation while traveling in your vehicle.

The most obvious symptom of car or motion sickness is vomiting. Your dog may also pant more rapidly than usual, salivate, or pace nervously by your car before you even load him into it. If your dog exhibits behavior like this before you even start the engine, it’s likely he’s not going to enjoy the ride and there’s a good chance he’ll get carsick.

Most dogs eventually outgrow motion-induced carsickness, but if you find that your pet is still having a particularly hard time traveling in your car, try using a natural supplement such as Calming Soft Chews from DogsHealth.com. These specially formulated chews have high potency natural ingredients that are properly formulated for optimal results. These chews will help your dog relax whether traveling or staying at home. Calming Soft Chews help with separation anxiety, nervousness, and pacing. They are a safer solution than over-the-counter products that can cause drowsiness in your pet.

You can also prepare your dog for traveling by car if you do not give him any food or water just before you leave on a trip. A dog will travel better if you give him just half or a fourth of his usual serving of food before you leave. Make plenty of rest stops if you notice your dog exhibiting any of the signs of car sickness. You may need to stop occasionally and take him on a short walk, or a little longer walk if he seems unusually stressed. This will give him an opportunity to walk off the stress.

If you have found other useful ways to handle car sickness in your dog, please feel free to share that with our other readers. They would appreciate it.

Why Older Dogs Need Expert Vet Care

Seeing that your aging dog receives regular expert vet care is vital in maintaining its good health. Regular checkups and preventive veterinary care can add years to the life of an older dog.

Many pet dogs are living longer lives due to early diagnosis of diseases and quicker treatments. Early intervention in a disease means the dog has a better chance of recovering and living a longer life. Most veterinary clinics and animal hospitals have special preventive care programs for older dogs. These programs may go under the moniker of “geriatric wellness programs,” or “senior care programs.” These exams usually include blood tests, urine tests, stool tests, and x-rays.

A dog’s health is partly determined by the health of its parents when conception occurred. The rest is up to the dog’s owner. A dog should have the necessary vaccinations, proper nutrition, good dental care, heartworm prevention, and other professional vet care during its life because all of these will have a direct bearing on a dog’s health as it ages. The healthier a dog is while growing up, the better its chances of being healthy as it grows older.

Appointments with a veterinarian usually include measuring the dog’s weight each visit. Any rapid or unexplained weight gain or weight loss is often the first sign of disease. Regular visits to the vet should be a part of every dog’s health care. It’s also very important to follow the vet’s recommendations on the proper feeding of older dogs. This helps ensure the dog is receiving the correct nutrition as it ages, and assists in preventing obesity which is one of the most common and preventable diseases in older dogs.

Older dogs should receive regular physical exams. How often these exams should be given depends a lot on the health of the dog; but older dogs, no matter their health status, should be examined by a vet at least once a year. Some older dogs who are diagnosed with health problems will need more visits with the veterinarian.

A physical assessment of the dog will include an examination of the mouth, teeth, gums, tongue, and throat. A rectal exam is also a part of the examination of an aging dog. The veterinarian will examine the inner pelvic area, the lining of the colon, check the dog’s lymph nodes, and the prostate in male dogs.

The physical exam will also include checking the dog’s skin and ears for ticks, fleas, or mites. Heartworm prevention is another important treatment for dogs of all ages but more so for aging dogs. Heartworm medications are available at all pet stores so it’s not difficult to prevent this disease.

If a dog shows any warning signs of heart, lung, kidney, or liver disease, X-rays will need to be taken. When a dog grows older and is still healthy, an X-ray of its chest and abdomen should be taken in case the dog later develops signs of disease. An X-ray taken when the dog was in good health can be compared to a new X-ray and will be valuable in diagnosing any symptoms the dog exhibits.

Owners of senior dogs should understand that the immune system of an older dog is not as strong as it was when the dog was younger, so it’s imperative that an aging dog be kept up-to-date on its vaccinations.

The problem of trying to control an animal’s pain must be handled by the vet. There are medications available that can help relieve pain in older dogs and make their lives a little more comfortable.

Older dogs need expert vet care to help prevent disease and to diagnose any health problems that can be treated and cured with the proper care. A veterinarian is the best partner a dog owner can have for keeping their dog healthy and making its senior years pleasurable.