Your Dog And Pain

YOUR PET AND PAIN: THE DOG LOVER’S CREED

Dog pain is part of loving and caring for a dog. While of course we never wish pain or suffering on ourselves or our loved ones, it is an inevitable part of living. As a human being lucky enough to have one or more dogs in your life, you must be willing to be responsible and accountable for your dog’s health, happiness and well-being at all times.

This means that you are the steward of your animal, and must always pay close attention to your dog’s habits and behavior. Close contact and regular observation will allow you to perceive health problems which may cause your dog painbefore they escalate into potentially life-threatening conditions.

In the process of paying attention, you will also learn who your dog is. This knowledge, of course, is the basis of any friendship, and no creature on earth reciprocates friendship as generously and unconditionally as your dog!

So the investment of time, attention, energy, and, yes, money, to keep your canine companion feeling great is well worth it. Effectively dealing with dog pain in an informed, mature, loving way is a major part of your responsibility as a dog’s friend and dog-owner. Luckily, breakthrough treatments like Winston’s Pain Formula and Winston’s Joint Formula now make it possible to treat many aspects of dog pain, from the source to the symptoms, without injections, potentially toxic drugs or side effects.

COMMON CAUSES OF DOG PAIN

Dogs are mammals with highly evolved skeletal and neuro-muscular systems, much like ourselves. They are vulnerable to injury, infection and parasites. And, many breeds have inherited, genetic predispositions to serious conditions which can dramatically affect their quality of life.

SKELETAL AND MUSCULAR PAIN: HIP DYSPLASIA AND ARTHRITIS

Hip dysplasia and dog arthritis affect many dogs, and are especially common in large breeds including German Shepherds, Rottweilers, Mastiffs, Spaniels and Retrievers. Purebred dogs in these groups are particularly prone, but even mixed-breeds may encounter these common sources of dog pain.

 Hip dysplasia is a condition in which the ball-and-socket joint of the hip becomes deformed, preventing full rotation of the ball in the socket. This condition is usually inherited, and become worse with age. The symptoms include chronic dog pain, cartilage-loss, loss of mobility, and atrophying of the hips and back legs.

Hip dysplasia is often accompanied by dog arthritis, which is an inflammation of the cartilage and its membranes, resulting in damage to surrounding tendons, nerves, muscle and bone. As with hip dysplasia, dog arthritis is a common cause of dog pain. While there is no cure, Winston’s Pain Formula and Winston’s Joint Formula offer safe, gentle effective treatment.

A FEW WORDS ABOUT COMPASSION:

The experience of pain is universal. And we now know that animals experience pain in much the same way that we do, as humans.  In his brilliant book, “The Exultant Ark”, author and naturalist Jonathan Peter Balcome studies and explores the capacity of animals to experience joy, as well as pain. A generation or two ago, many people actually believed that the “lower animals” as they were called literally did not have this ability. Science now tells us something quite different, that even invertebrates — even shrimp! — avoid pain and seek pleasure.

So, it goes without saying that your dog experiences the gamut of sensations from misery and agony to pure joy. One of the reasons that human beings love dogs is because their joy-threshold is so low.  It doesn’t take much to make them ecstatically happy, and they love us so easily. They are always happy to see us, always happy to catch the ball, always happy to see the leash, always happy to run themselves silly in the dog-park…. unless they are in pain.

Whenever you encounter your dog, another animal, another person, or any other living being, consider these words:

  • Compassion
  • Sympathy
  • Empathy
  • Pathology
  • Pathetic

These words arise from the same source. “Passion” is a Latin word which comes from the Greek word, “pathos”. The original root-words refer to the experience of suffering. When we realize that all beings may experience pain, our view of the world changes.

HOW TO TELL WHEN YOUR DOG IS IN PAIN

Because you are in tune with your dog, the first signal that something may be wrong may simply be a change in how your canine friend looks, moves, and relates to you and the rest of your family.

WARNING: Even a subtle change in behavior, appearance, or both may be your first clue that your dog’s health needs to be checked out by a veterinarian.

As the dog’s best friend, dog pain will be more immediately obvious to you than it will be in many cases. Of course, a visible injury (broken bone, bleeding cut or laceration) is unmistakable, but often dog pain comes from a source which cannot be seen by the naked eye, such as dog arthritis and hip dysplasia. Winston’s Pain Formula and Winston’s Joint Formula offer safe, gentle effective treatment for these common sources of dog pain. It’s estimated that 1 in 4 dogs will experience arthritis, and this condition often is accompanied by hip dysplasia. Early, accurate diagnosis and treatment with these natural formulas, which were developed by a naturopathic doctor for his own dog, are key steps to effectively intercepting and managing dog pain so that your pet’s suffering is kept to a minimum.

Some breeds are literally genetically engineered not to show pain. For instance, Pit Bulls are more likely to suppress their feelings of pain. It is part of their inherited makeup as a breed! Other large breeds also often display this Stoic tendency. This can make the identification and diagnosis process more difficult.

HINT:  LOOK FOR SIGNS OF SUBMISSION.

Many large, aggressive breeds will not easily show pain because they have been bred to assume a dominant pack-attitude. If your dog, regardless of the breed, shows signs of submission—passive behavior– at inappropriate times, these may be signals of dog pain:

  • Lowered head – this is where we get our expression, “Hang-dog”
  • Slumped posture
  • Flattened ears
  • Lying down instead of standing or sitting in the alert position
  • Avoids interaction with you, other humans, other dogs
  • Soft whining
  • Refusal to compete, even in a “safe”, play environment
  • Avoids eye-contact
  • Allowing other dogs to consume its food
  • Allowing other dogs to “move to the front of the line” at meal-times

And don’t be fooled by tail-wagging. We want to believe that only happy dogs wag their tails. In fact, tail-wagging may be a sign of submission. The dog may be trying to comfort YOU and assure you that everything is fine, and does so by generously wagging its tail.

If your dog just seems different – “off”—keep checking. Loss of appetite and loss of energy are obvious first clues.

A dog who’s suffering may be sluggish and lethargic, with no interest in the usual joys of dog-dom like daily walks, rides in the car, trips to the dog park, catching the Frisbee and fetching the ball.

And, a dog in pain may also turn aggressive. Undiagnosed pain is often the underlying cause of a sudden “snap” in dog personality, including biting.

DO A NOSE-TO-TAIL QUICK-CHECK

If you sense that your dog is experiencing pain, give your pet a nose-to-tail check yourself. In fact, doing this on a daily basis, even when your dog seems to be a perfect shape, keeps you and your dog closely connected. A daily analysis of the “whole” dog may help you keep your dog’s quality of life at its peak.

Begin by bathing your dog if this is part of your usual routine. Or, start with a gentle brushing, or even just a light fur-ruffling and head-to tail stroking with your hands. If the dog jumps, snaps, winces or flinches when you touch it, take note of where your hands are when this happens. Arthritis and hip dysplasia, very common sources of dog pain, may make your dog hypersensitive to even the gentlest touch on its joints, legs and hips.

  • COAT AND FUR  – Pay attention to the dog’s coat. If the hair seems unusually dull, clumped, or matted, this may indicate that your dog is not grooming—a common sign of dog pain, and possible illness.

TIP: Also, look for areas around the joints where the fur seems to have changed color. Dog pain in a leg or hip often causes the dog to lick that area obsessively, and the constant saturation with the enzymes in the dog’s saliva actually bleaches the hair to a lighter tone.

  • START AT THE NOSE –  The nose-“leather” should be clean, shiny, cool and moist. A dry, cracked or swollen nose may indicate inflammation, dehydration or even fever and infection in your dog’s system. Be aware of unusual discharge (dark, green, yellow, and traces of blood).
  • EYES – Should be bright. Gently pull the lower lid down with your fingertip to get a look at the mucus membrane. All mammalian eyes and noses produce some discharge. Normal discharge is thin and clear, and will wipe off easily with a warm washcloth. Look for signs of inflammation or infection. Dilated pupils may indicate fever.
  • MOUTH – Dogs are infamous for their “doggy-breath”, so don’t expect a bouquet of roses. But do make your dog’s dental health a concern. Canine toothpastes are available for home use, and every veterinarian offers professional teeth cleaning for pets. This helps prevent painful abscesses which can make your dog ill and lead to tooth loss. Dogs also drool—many breeds in particular. However, if your dog is drooling or panting in an unusual way, you may be facing dog pain.
  • HEAD AND THROAT – Press through the fur gently to feel for any lesions, such as a wound from a fight, lumps, bumps, or any cysts or other thickening under the hair and skin. A bite-wound from another dog, or any kind of wound, may go undetected in long-haired dogs especially. Untreated wounds may lead to infection.
  • CHEST AND SHOULDERS– When you feel your dog’s chest, shoulders, feel for its heartbeat. A rapid pulse often indicates that the animal is suffering and trying to cope with pain. Overdeveloped chest and shoulders may indicate weakness in the rear legs, often accompanied by dog pain.

TIP: Pay careful attention to how your dog stands and walks. Dogs who are experiencing hip dysplasia or arthritis in their hips and back legs will often slump or lower their hindquarters. They do this in order to take weight from the painful areas, and tend to place more weight on their front legs. This will often result in the dog standing with its rear legs unusually close together, and its front legs wide apart.

Also watch for changes in your dog’s walk-pattern or run-pattern. When a dog has pain in its back legs, it often will “bunny hop”, using both of its rear legs like a pogo-stick since normal weight-distribution may be painful. If your dog limps or displays a gait-pattern like a bunny-hop, it is a clear sign of dog pain, so seek medical attention immediately.

  • BELLY– Your dog’s mid-section are where many major organs are located. A bloated or tender tummy indicates an internal issue and requires immediate attention. Constipation is a common cause, so monitor your dog’s bowel and bladder elimination patterns closely. Pay attention to weight-loss and gain. A dog experiencing pain often will stop eating.
  • JOINTS AND LIMBS– In healthy mammals, light, evenly applied tactile pressure feels good. This is the appeal of a massage. If your dog reacts—pulls its paw away, snaps, whines—when you touch one of its joints, it is likely that dog arthritis, hip dysplasia or both are present. Winston’s Pain Formula and Winston’s Joint Formula (www.dogshealth) offer safe, gentle effective treatment for these common sources of dog pain.
  • TAIL—Your dog will probably wag its tail just to make you feel better, even if it is in pain. Do take note of changes in mood and personality. Look under the tail for unusual discharge from the anus or female uro-genital structure. These tissues should be smooth, clean and moist, like healthy gum-tissue. Seek immediate veterinary assistance at any sign of swelling, bleeding or inflammation in these areas, since these are indicators of health issues and accompanying dog pain.

Does Your Dog Have Trouble:

  • Walking?
  • Standing?
  • Getting up?

 

 

 

Hip Dysplasia in Collies

Meet the Collies

Collies are friendly, loving and highly intelligent. They make gentle and loyal friends to the entire family, even to other pets in a household. A healthy Collie can live as long as 16 years. Unfortunately, Collies are very susceptible to developing hip dysplasia and arthritis.

Hip Dysplasia in Collies – What Is It?

Hip dysplasia is a degenerative condition, which can affect any dog. Although the causes may vary, the effects are always the same: loss of mobility, increasing pain, impaired gait, and even behavioral and mood changes in your dog (including snappishness and depression).

What Are the Signs of Hip Dysplasia in Collies?

  • Hobbles, or walks/trots with an irregular gait
  • Tries to keep weight off one of the rear legs
  • Starts to slow down or limp on a favorite walk or run
  • Stays in bed instead of playing outdoors
  • Whimpers or yelps when climbing stairs
  • Flinches when the hip area or lower back are touched

What Happens in Hip Dysplasia – Why Does It Hurt?

Dysplasia is simply the dislocation of a bone from its proper place. “Plasia” is the Greek word for molding, so it’s easy to visualize an architectural form, like a beam or column, separating from its stabilizing molding.  Hip dysplasia or displacement is one of the best-known types of dysplasia in dogs.

The degenerative process of hip dysplasia is gradual. The onset of symptoms, specifically pain, is also somewhat gradual taking place over the course of years. In simple terms, the two bones of the hip joint shift out of alignment. The structure of a dog’s hip bones is similar to our human hip formation, consisting of a precisely fitted ball-and-socket joint. This is called a “spheroidal” joint, referring to the spherical head of the distal or articulating bone, which fit into the cup-like cavity of the accompanying bone.

Perhaps because they are such hand-working structures, the ball and socket joints are prone to disease, and simple mechanical wear and damage over time.

Here’s what we’ve learned so far:

  • Hip dysplasia results in several symptoms which reduce mobility and cause pain.
  • The muscles and joints become lax, and the joint capsule, a strong band of connective tissue which circled the bones for added stability, loses its elastic strength.
  • As this happens, the articular (working) surfaces of the two bones lose contact with each other. The bones slowly separate as the soft tissues around the joint degenerate. The disease may affect one or both right and left hips.

With the loss of protective scaffolding between the bone surfaces, the nerves in the bone endings themselves become exposed. When bone touches bone, there is acute pain. In addition, the loss of tensile strength of the supporting tendons, muscle, and cartilage means that other structures in the hip and leg must compensate in terms of weight-bearing and movement. This unnatural compensation may cause fatigue and pain. It may even cause the dog to injure itself—running to catch a Frisbee, or climbing stairs, for instance.

What Causes Hip Dysplasia?

Experts disagree as to the source of hip dysplasia in dogs.

  • Too much food

    One theory is that feeding a young, growing dog too many calories early in its development contributes to the disorder.

  • Too much exercise

    Another theory is that too much exercise, or the wrong kind of exercise, or simply too much high-impact exercise, such as fetching, jumping, and catching a ball or Frisbee on concrete, contributes to hip dysplasia.

A factual observation about this condition is that hip dysplasia tends to affect large breeds more so than smaller dogs. This, too, is relative—it is possible for small dogs to become affected by hip dysplasia, too.  However, we correctly associate the condition most frequently with big breeds.

These breeds do carry a genetic predisposition toward the condition. It is also true that purebreds, especially large dogs, are most likely to become vulnerable to hip dysplasia, therefore calling upon informed and responsible breeding practices.

What You Can Do to Improve Your Dog’s Quality of Life

Our first instinct as dog lovers is to stop the pain. Sometimes our decision-making process is clouded by emotion—guilt, fear, even panic when we see our beloved canine companion suffering. Many conventional treatments for hip dysplasia in dogs have side effects, or simply don’t work.

1) Try Winston’s Joint System and Winston’s Pain Formula

A naturopathic doctor developed Winston’s Joint System and Winston’s Pain Formula. These offer support and relief for many conditions affecting your dog’s joints including hip dysplasia, arthritis, and inflammatory diseases. These are also common in dogs, attacking the cartilage, muscles, and membrane linings of cartilage and joints.

These may offer your dog safe alternatives: calming inflammation as an immediate solution and helping to rebuild joint integrity as a long-range treatment. These trusted products can slow or even stop the degeneration of the hip joint. In many cases, hip replacement surgery which is the last resort may be prevented altogether. For over 30 years, Winston’s formulas have helped thousands of dogs from all over the world.

2) Schedule a visit with your veterinarian

If your dog is clearly in pain, schedule a visit with your veterinarian. An X-ray examination will be recommended as a first step.

3) Monitor your dog’s weight

Obesity makes hip dysplasia worse. If your dog becomes less active, weight gain may become a challenge. Eliminate treats, and if possible, offer your dog low-impact exercises like stretching and swimming.

4) Remove unnecessary physical stressors from your dog’s life

5) Replace stairs with a ramp

While your dog is recovering, this prevents further damage to the damaged hip.

6) Provide a padded dog bed

Sleeping on a hard surface may increase the inflammation associated with hip dysplasia. A gel bed, which actually contains a soft jelly that conforms to your dog’s body, relieves pressure from sore joints.

7) Experiment with low-heat heating pads or fleece-covered hot water bottles

Together with gentle massages, these ways relax your dog and provide comfort during the healing process.

Is Your Dog Experiencing Hip Dysplasia or Other Forms of Pain?

We Can Help.

Does your dog have trouble walking, standing, or getting up? There is an excellent chance we can help your dog.

Since 1990, Winston’s Joint System and Winston’s Pain Formula have helped heal over twenty thousand dogs from all over the world. Our staff specializes in hip dysplasia, arthritis, and all joint pain & mobility issues.

To start your dog’s pain-free life, please contact us at www.dogshealth.com or call our toll-free number at 888-901-5557.

 

Hip Dysplasia in Doberman Pinschers

Hip Dysplasia in Doberman Pinschers – What Is It?

Hip dysplasia is a degenerative condition, which can affect any dog. Although the causes may vary, the effects are always the same: loss of mobility, increasing pain, impaired gait, and even behavioral and mood changes in your dog (including snappishness and depression).

What Are the Signs of Hip Dysplasia in Doberman Pinschers?

  • Hobbles, or walks/trots with an irregular gait
  • Tries to keep weight off one of the rear legs
  • Starts to slow down or limp on a favorite walk or run
  • Stays in bed instead of playing outdoors
  • Whimpers or yelps when climbing stairs
  • Flinches when the hip area or lower back are touched

What Happens in Hip Dysplasia – Why Does It Hurt?

Dysplasia is simply the dislocation of a bone from its proper place. “Plasia” is the Greek word for molding, so it’s easy to visualize an architectural form, like a beam or column, separating from its stabilizing molding.  Hip dysplasia or displacement is one of the best-known types of dysplasia in dogs.

The degenerative process of hip dysplasia is gradual. The onset of symptoms, specifically pain, is also somewhat gradual taking place over the course of years. In simple terms, the two bones of the hip joint shift out of alignment. The structure of a dog’s hip bones is similar to our human hip formation, consisting of a precisely fitted ball-and-socket joint. This is called a “spheroidal” joint, referring to the spherical head of the distal or articulating bone, which fit into the cup-like cavity of the accompanying bone.

Perhaps because they are such hand-working structures, the ball and socket joints are prone to disease, and simple mechanical wear and damage over time.

Here’s what we’ve learned so far:

  • Hip dysplasia results in several symptoms which reduce mobility and cause pain.
  • The muscles and joints become lax, and the joint capsule, a strong band of connective tissue which circled the bones for added stability, loses its elastic strength.
  • As this happens, the articular (working) surfaces of the two bones lose contact with each other. The bones slowly separate as the soft tissues around the joint degenerate. The disease may affect one or both right and left hips.

With the loss of protective scaffolding between the bone surfaces, the nerves in the bone endings themselves become exposed. When bone touches bone, there is acute pain. In addition, the loss of tensile strength of the supporting tendons, muscle, and cartilage means that other structures in the hip and leg must compensate in terms of weight-bearing and movement. This unnatural compensation may cause fatigue and pain. It may even cause the dog to injure itself—running to catch a Frisbee, or climbing stairs, for instance.

What Causes Hip Dysplasia?

Experts disagree as to the source of hip dysplasia in dogs.

  • Too much food

    One theory is that feeding a young, growing dog too many calories early in its development contributes to the disorder.

  • Too much exercise

    Another theory is that too much exercise, or the wrong kind of exercise, or simply too much high-impact exercise, such as fetching, jumping, and catching a ball or Frisbee on concrete, contributes to hip dysplasia.

A factual observation about this condition is that hip dysplasia tends to affect large breeds more so than smaller dogs. This, too, is relative—it is possible for small dogs to become affected by hip dysplasia, too.  However, we correctly associate the condition most frequently with big breeds.

These breeds do carry a genetic predisposition toward the condition. It is also true that purebreds, especially large dogs, are most likely to become vulnerable to hip dysplasia, therefore calling upon informed and responsible breeding practices.

What You Can Do to Improve Your Dog’s Quality of Life

Our first instinct as dog lovers is to stop the pain. Sometimes our decision-making process is clouded by emotion—guilt, fear, even panic when we see our beloved canine companion suffering. Many conventional treatments for hip dysplasia in dogs have side effects, or simply don’t work.

1) Try Winston’s Joint System and Winston’s Pain Formula

A naturopathic doctor developed Winston’s Joint System and Winston’s Pain Formula. These offer support and relief for many conditions affecting your dog’s joints including hip dysplasia, arthritis, and inflammatory diseases. These are also common in dogs, attacking the cartilage, muscles, and membrane linings of cartilage and joints.

These may offer your dog safe alternatives: calming inflammation as an immediate solution and helping to rebuild joint integrity as a long-range treatment. These trusted products can slow or even stop the degeneration of the hip joint. In many cases, hip replacement surgery which is the last resort may be prevented altogether. For over 30 years, Winston’s formulas have helped thousands of dogs from all over the world.

2) Schedule a visit with your veterinarian

If your dog is clearly in pain, schedule a visit with your veterinarian. An X-ray examination will be recommended as a first step.

3) Monitor your dog’s weight

Obesity makes hip dysplasia worse. If your dog becomes less active, weight gain may become a challenge. Eliminate treats, and if possible, offer your dog low-impact exercises like stretching and swimming.

4) Remove unnecessary physical stressors from your dog’s life

5) Replace stairs with a ramp

While your dog is recovering, this prevents further damage to the damaged hip.

6) Provide a padded dog bed

Sleeping on a hard surface may increase the inflammation associated with hip dysplasia. A gel bed, which actually contains a soft jelly that conforms to your dog’s body, relieves pressure from sore joints.

7) Experiment with low-heat heating pads or fleece-covered hot water bottles

Together with gentle massages, these ways relax your dog and provide comfort during the healing process.

Is Your Dog Experiencing Hip Dysplasia or Other Forms of Pain? We Can Help

Does your dog have trouble walking, standing, or getting up? There is an excellent chance we can help your dog.

Since 1990, Winston’s Joint System and Winston’s Pain Formula have helped heal over twenty thousand dogs from all over the world. Our staff specializes in hip dysplasia, arthritis, and all joint pain & mobility issues.

To start your dog’s pain-free life, please contact us at www.dogshealth.com or call our toll-free number at 888-901-5557.

Hip Dysplasia in Golden Retrievers

Hip Dysplasia in Golden Retrievers – What Is It?

Hip dysplasia is a degenerative condition, which can affect any dog. Although the causes may vary, the effects are always the same: loss of mobility, increasing pain, impaired gait, and even behavioral and mood changes in your dog (including snappishness and depression).

What Are the Signs of Hip Dysplasia in Golden Retrievers?

  • Hobbles, or walks/trots with an irregular gait
  • Tries to keep weight off one of the rear legs
  • Starts to slow down or limp on a favorite walk or run
  • Stays in bed instead of playing outdoors
  • Whimpers or yelps when climbing stairs
  • Flinches when the hip area or lower back are touched

What Happens in Hip Dysplasia – Why Does It Hurt?

Dysplasia is simply the dislocation of a bone from its proper place. “Plasia” is the Greek word for molding, so it’s easy to visualize an architectural form, like a beam or column, separating from its stabilizing molding.  Hip dysplasia or displacement is one of the best-known types of dysplasia in dogs.

The degenerative process of hip dysplasia is gradual. The onset of symptoms, specifically pain, is also somewhat gradual taking place over the course of years. In simple terms, the two bones of the hip joint shift out of alignment. The structure of a dog’s hip bones is similar to our human hip formation, consisting of a precisely fitted ball-and-socket joint. This is called a “spheroidal” joint, referring to the spherical head of the distal or articulating bone, which fit into the cup-like cavity of the accompanying bone.

Perhaps because they are such hand-working structures, the ball and socket joints are prone to disease, and simple mechanical wear and damage over time.

Here’s what we’ve learned so far:

  • Hip dysplasia results in several symptoms which reduce mobility and cause pain.
  • The muscles and joints become lax, and the joint capsule, a strong band of connective tissue which circled the bones for added stability, loses its elastic strength.
  • As this happens, the articular (working) surfaces of the two bones lose contact with each other. The bones slowly separate as the soft tissues around the joint degenerate. The disease may affect one or both right and left hips.

With the loss of protective scaffolding between the bone surfaces, the nerves in the bone endings themselves become exposed. When bone touches bone, there is acute pain. In addition, the loss of tensile strength of the supporting tendons, muscle, and cartilage means that other structures in the hip and leg must compensate in terms of weight-bearing and movement. This unnatural compensation may cause fatigue and pain. It may even cause the dog to injure itself—running to catch a Frisbee, or climbing stairs, for instance.

What Causes Hip Dysplasia?

Experts disagree as to the source of hip dysplasia in dogs.

  • Too much food

    One theory is that feeding a young, growing dog too many calories early in its development contributes to the disorder.

  • Too much exercise

    Another theory is that too much exercise, or the wrong kind of exercise, or simply too much high-impact exercise, such as fetching, jumping, and catching a ball or Frisbee on concrete, contributes to hip dysplasia.

A factual observation about this condition is that hip dysplasia tends to affect large breeds more so than smaller dogs. This, too, is relative—it is possible for small dogs to become affected by hip dysplasia, too.  However, we correctly associate the condition most frequently with big breeds.

These breeds do carry a genetic predisposition toward the condition. It is also true that purebreds, especially large dogs, are most likely to become vulnerable to hip dysplasia, therefore calling upon informed and responsible breeding practices.

What You Can Do to Improve Your Dog’s Quality of Life

Our first instinct as dog lovers is to stop the pain. Sometimes our decision-making process is clouded by emotion—guilt, fear, even panic when we see our beloved canine companion suffering. Many conventional treatments for hip dysplasia in dogs have side effects, or simply don’t work.

1) Try Winston’s Joint System and Winston’s Pain Formula

A naturopathic doctor developed Winston’s Joint System and Winston’s Pain Formula. These offer support and relief for many conditions affecting your dog’s joints including hip dysplasia, arthritis, and inflammatory diseases. These are also common in dogs, attacking the cartilage, muscles, and membrane linings of cartilage and joints.

These may offer your dog safe alternatives: calming inflammation as an immediate solution and helping to rebuild joint integrity as a long-range treatment. These trusted products can slow or even stop the degeneration of the hip joint. In many cases, hip replacement surgery which is the last resort may be prevented altogether. For over 30 years, Winston’s formulas have helped thousands of dogs from all over the world.

2) Schedule a visit with your veterinarian

If your dog is clearly in pain, schedule a visit with your veterinarian. An X-ray examination will be recommended as a first step.

3) Monitor your dog’s weight

Obesity makes hip dysplasia worse. If your dog becomes less active, weight gain may become a challenge. Eliminate treats, and if possible, offer your dog low-impact exercises like stretching and swimming.

4) Remove unnecessary physical stressors from your dog’s life

5) Replace stairs with a ramp

While your dog is recovering, this prevents further damage to the damaged hip.

6) Provide a padded dog bed

Sleeping on a hard surface may increase the inflammation associated with hip dysplasia. A gel bed, which actually contains a soft jelly that conforms to your dog’s body, relieves pressure from sore joints.

7) Experiment with low-heat heating pads or fleece-covered hot water bottles

Together with gentle massages, these ways relax your dog and provide comfort during the healing process.

Is Your Dog Experiencing Hip Dysplasia or Other Forms of Pain?

We Can Help.

Does your dog have trouble walking, standing, or getting up? There is an excellent chance we can help your dog.

Since 1990, Winston’s Joint System and Winston’s Pain Formula have helped heal over twenty thousand dogs from all over the world. Our staff specializes in hip dysplasia, arthritis, and all joint pain & mobility issues.

To start your dog’s pain-free life, please contact us at www.dogshealth.com or call our toll-free number at 888-901-5557.

Hip Dysplasia in English Springer Spaniels

English Springer Spaniels are a marvelous combination of sturdiness and composure. They are charming dogs that feel right at home at family events, picnics, or even dinner parties.

Most people wouldn’t associate English Springer Spaniels and hip dysplasia, because it just doesn’t seem to be a major problem with this breed. But statistics prove that these beautiful animals are indeed susceptible to this disease.

Hip Dysplasia in English Springer Spaniels – What Is It?

Hip dysplasia is a degenerative condition, which can affect any dog. Although the causes may vary, the effects are always the same: loss of mobility, increasing pain, impaired gait, and even behavioral and mood changes in your dog (including snappishness and depression).

What Are the Signs of Hip Dysplasia in English Springer Spaniels?

  • Hobbles, or walks/trots with an irregular gait
  • Tries to keep weight off one of the rear legs
  • Starts to slow down or limp on a favorite walk or run
  • Stays in bed instead of playing outdoors
  • Whimpers or yelps when climbing stairs
  • Flinches when the hip area or lower back are touched

What Happens in Hip Dysplasia – Why Does It Hurt?

Dysplasia is simply the dislocation of a bone from its proper place. “Plasia” is the Greek word for molding, so it’s easy to visualize an architectural form, like a beam or column, separating from its stabilizing molding.  Hip dysplasia or displacement is one of the best-known types of dysplasia in dogs.

The degenerative process of hip dysplasia is gradual. The onset of symptoms, specifically pain, is also somewhat gradual taking place over the course of years. In simple terms, the two bones of the hip joint shift out of alignment. The structure of a dog’s hip bones is similar to our human hip formation, consisting of a precisely fitted ball-and-socket joint. This is called a “spheroidal” joint, referring to the spherical head of the distal or articulating bone, which fit into the cup-like cavity of the accompanying bone.

Perhaps because they are such hand-working structures, the ball and socket joints are prone to disease, and simple mechanical wear and damage over time.

Here’s what we’ve learned so far:

  • Hip dysplasia results in several symptoms which reduce mobility and cause pain.
  • The muscles and joints become lax, and the joint capsule, a strong band of connective tissue which circled the bones for added stability, loses its elastic strength.
  • As this happens, the articular (working) surfaces of the two bones lose contact with each other. The bones slowly separate as the soft tissues around the joint degenerate. The disease may affect one or both right and left hips.

With the loss of protective scaffolding between the bone surfaces, the nerves in the bone endings themselves become exposed. When bone touches bone, there is acute pain. In addition, the loss of tensile strength of the supporting tendons, muscle, and cartilage means that other structures in the hip and leg must compensate in terms of weight-bearing and movement. This unnatural compensation may cause fatigue and pain. It may even cause the dog to injure itself—running to catch a Frisbee, or climbing stairs, for instance.

What Causes Hip Dysplasia?

Experts disagree as to the source of hip dysplasia in dogs.

  • Too much food

    One theory is that feeding a young, growing dog too many calories early in its development contributes to the disorder.

  • Too much exercise

    Another theory is that too much exercise, or the wrong kind of exercise, or simply too much high-impact exercise, such as fetching, jumping, and catching a ball or Frisbee on concrete, contributes to hip dysplasia.

A factual observation about this condition is that hip dysplasia tends to affect large breeds more so than smaller dogs. This, too, is relative—it is possible for small dogs to become affected by hip dysplasia, too.  However, we correctly associate the condition most frequently with big breeds.

These breeds do carry a genetic predisposition toward the condition. It is also true that purebreds, especially large dogs, are most likely to become vulnerable to hip dysplasia, therefore calling upon informed and responsible breeding practices.

What You Can Do to Improve Your Dog’s Quality of Life

Our first instinct as dog lovers is to stop the pain. Sometimes our decision-making process is clouded by emotion—guilt, fear, even panic when we see our beloved canine companion suffering. Many conventional treatments for hip dysplasia in dogs have side effects, or simply don’t work.

1) Try Winston’s Joint System and Winston’s Pain Formula

A naturopathic doctor developed Winston’s Joint System and Winston’s Pain Formula. These offer support and relief for many conditions affecting your dog’s joints including hip dysplasia, arthritis, and inflammatory diseases. These are also common in dogs, attacking the cartilage, muscles, and membrane linings of cartilage and joints.

These may offer your dog safe alternatives: calming inflammation as an immediate solution and helping to rebuild joint integrity as a long-range treatment. These trusted products can slow or even stop the degeneration of the hip joint. In many cases, hip replacement surgery which is the last resort may be prevented altogether. For over 30 years, Winston’s formulas have helped thousands of dogs from all over the world.

2) Schedule a visit with your veterinarian

If your dog is clearly in pain, schedule a visit with your veterinarian. An X-ray examination will be recommended as a first step.

3) Monitor your dog’s weight

Obesity makes hip dysplasia worse. If your dog becomes less active, weight gain may become a challenge. Eliminate treats, and if possible, offer your dog low-impact exercises like stretching and swimming.

4) Remove unnecessary physical stressors from your dog’s life

5) Replace stairs with a ramp

While your dog is recovering, this prevents further damage to the damaged hip.

6) Provide a padded dog bed

Sleeping on a hard surface may increase the inflammation associated with hip dysplasia. A gel bed, which actually contains a soft jelly that conforms to your dog’s body, relieves pressure from sore joints.

7) Experiment with low-heat heating pads or fleece-covered hot water bottles

Together with gentle massages, these ways relax your dog and provide comfort during the healing process.

Is Your Dog Experiencing Hip Dysplasia or Other Forms of Pain?

We Can Help.

Does your dog have trouble walking, standing, or getting up? There is an excellent chance we can help your dog.

Since 1990, Winston’s Joint System and Winston’s Pain Formula have helped heal over twenty thousand dogs from all over the world. Our staff specializes in hip dysplasia, arthritis, and all joint pain & mobility issues.

To start your dog’s pain-free life, please contact us at www.dogshealth.com or call our toll-free number at 888-901-5557.

Hip Dysplasia in Boxer Dogs

The Boxer is one of the most popular breeds in the U.S. and is ranked as the 6th most-registered breed by the American Kennel Club. Unfortunately, hip dysplasia in Boxers is a common health issue, causing them to suffer from this life-threatening disease.

Hip Dysplasia in Boxer Dogs – What Is It?

Hip dysplasia is a degenerative condition, which can affect any dog. Although the causes may vary, the effects are always the same: loss of mobility, increasing pain, impaired gait, and even behavioral and mood changes in your dog (including snappishness and depression).

What Are the Signs of Hip Dysplasia in Boxer Dogs?

  • Hobbles, or walks/trots with an irregular gait
  • Tries to keep weight off one of the rear legs
  • Starts to slow down or limp on a favorite walk or run
  • Stays in bed instead of playing outdoors
  • Whimpers or yelps when climbing stairs
  • Flinches when the hip area or lower back are touched

What Happens in Hip Dysplasia – Why Does It Hurt?

Dysplasia is simply the dislocation of a bone from its proper place. “Plasia” is the Greek word for molding, so it’s easy to visualize an architectural form, like a beam or column, separating from its stabilizing molding.  Hip dysplasia or displacement is one of the best-known types of dysplasia in dogs.

The degenerative process of hip dysplasia is gradual. The onset of symptoms, specifically pain, is also somewhat gradual taking place over the course of years. In simple terms, the two bones of the hip joint shift out of alignment. The structure of a dog’s hip bones is similar to our human hip formation, consisting of a precisely fitted ball-and-socket joint. This is called a “spheroidal” joint, referring to the spherical head of the distal or articulating bone, which fit into the cup-like cavity of the accompanying bone.

Perhaps because they are such hand-working structures, the ball and socket joints are prone to disease, and simple mechanical wear and damage over time.

Here’s what we’ve learned so far:

  • Hip dysplasia results in several symptoms which reduce mobility and cause pain.
  • The muscles and joints become lax, and the joint capsule, a strong band of connective tissue which circled the bones for added stability, loses its elastic strength.
  • As this happens, the articular (working) surfaces of the two bones lose contact with each other. The bones slowly separate as the soft tissues around the joint degenerate. The disease may affect one or both right and left hips.

With the loss of protective scaffolding between the bone surfaces, the nerves in the bone endings themselves become exposed. When bone touches bone, there is acute pain. In addition, the loss of tensile strength of the supporting tendons, muscle, and cartilage means that other structures in the hip and leg must compensate in terms of weight-bearing and movement. This unnatural compensation may cause fatigue and pain. It may even cause the dog to injure itself—running to catch a Frisbee, or climbing stairs, for instance.

What Causes Hip Dysplasia?

Experts disagree as to the source of hip dysplasia in dogs.

  • Too much food

    One theory is that feeding a young, growing dog too many calories early in its development contributes to the disorder.

  • Too much exercise

    Another theory is that too much exercise, or the wrong kind of exercise, or simply too much high-impact exercise, such as fetching, jumping, and catching a ball or Frisbee on concrete, contributes to hip dysplasia.

A factual observation about this condition is that hip dysplasia tends to affect large breeds more so than smaller dogs. This, too, is relative—it is possible for small dogs to become affected by hip dysplasia, too.  However, we correctly associate the condition most frequently with big breeds.

These breeds do carry a genetic predisposition toward the condition. It is also true that purebreds, especially large dogs, are most likely to become vulnerable to hip dysplasia, therefore calling upon informed and responsible breeding practices.

What You Can Do to Improve Your Dog’s Quality of Life

Our first instinct as dog lovers is to stop the pain. Sometimes our decision-making process is clouded by emotion—guilt, fear, even panic when we see our beloved canine companion suffering. Many conventional treatments for hip dysplasia in dogs have side effects, or simply don’t work.

1) Try Winston’s Joint System and Winston’s Pain Formula

A naturopathic doctor developed Winston’s Joint System and Winston’s Pain Formula. These offer support and relief for many conditions affecting your dog’s joints including hip dysplasia, arthritis, and inflammatory diseases. These are also common in dogs, attacking the cartilage, muscles, and membrane linings of cartilage and joints.

These may offer your dog safe alternatives: calming inflammation as an immediate solution and helping to rebuild joint integrity as a long-range treatment. These trusted products can slow or even stop the degeneration of the hip joint. In many cases, hip replacement surgery which is the last resort may be prevented altogether. For over 30 years, Winston’s formulas have helped thousands of dogs from all over the world.

2) Schedule a visit with your veterinarian

If your dog is clearly in pain, schedule a visit with your veterinarian. An X-ray examination will be recommended as a first step.

3) Monitor your dog’s weight

Obesity makes hip dysplasia worse. If your dog becomes less active, weight gain may become a challenge. Eliminate treats, and if possible, offer your dog low-impact exercises like stretching and swimming.

4) Remove unnecessary physical stressors from your dog’s life

5) Replace stairs with a ramp

While your dog is recovering, this prevents further damage to the damaged hip.

6) Provide a padded dog bed

Sleeping on a hard surface may increase the inflammation associated with hip dysplasia. A gel bed, which actually contains a soft jelly that conforms to your dog’s body, relieves pressure from sore joints.

7) Experiment with low-heat heating pads or fleece-covered hot water bottles

Together with gentle massages, these ways relax your dog and provide comfort during the healing process.

Is Your Dog Experiencing Hip Dysplasia or Other Forms of Pain?

We Can Help.

Does your dog have trouble walking, standing, or getting up? There is an excellent chance we can help your dog.

Since 1990, Winston’s Joint System and Winston’s Pain Formula have helped heal over twenty thousand dogs from all over the world. Our staff specializes in hip dysplasia, arthritis, and all joint pain & mobility issues.

To start your dog’s pain-free life, please contact us at www.dogshealth.com or call our toll-free number at 888-901-5557.

Hip Dysplasia in Airedale Terriers

If you are considering the adoption of a pet dog and are leaning toward an Airedale Terrier, you need to know the facts on hip dysplasia.

Hip Dysplasia in Airedale Terriers – What Is It?

Hip dysplasia is a degenerative condition, which can affect any dog. Although the causes may vary, the effects are always the same: loss of mobility, increasing pain, impaired gait, and even behavioral and mood changes in your dog (including snappishness and depression).

What Are the Signs of Hip Dysplasia in Airedale Terriers?

  • Hobbles, or walks/trots with an irregular gait
  • Tries to keep weight off one of the rear legs
  • Starts to slow down or limp on a favorite walk or run
  • Stays in bed instead of playing outdoors
  • Whimpers or yelps when climbing stairs
  • Flinches when the hip area or lower back are touched

What Happens in Hip Dysplasia – Why Does It Hurt?

Dysplasia is simply the dislocation of a bone from its proper place. “Plasia” is the Greek word for molding, so it’s easy to visualize an architectural form, like a beam or column, separating from its stabilizing molding.  Hip dysplasia or displacement is one of the best-known types of dysplasia in dogs.

The degenerative process of hip dysplasia is gradual. The onset of symptoms, specifically pain, is also somewhat gradual taking place over the course of years. In simple terms, the two bones of the hip joint shift out of alignment. The structure of a dog’s hip bones is similar to our human hip formation, consisting of a precisely fitted ball-and-socket joint. This is called a “spheroidal” joint, referring to the spherical head of the distal or articulating bone, which fit into the cup-like cavity of the accompanying bone.

Perhaps because they are such hand-working structures, the ball and socket joints are prone to disease, and simple mechanical wear and damage over time.

Here’s what we’ve learned so far:

  • Hip dysplasia results in several symptoms which reduce mobility and cause pain.
  • The muscles and joints become lax, and the joint capsule, a strong band of connective tissue which circled the bones for added stability, loses its elastic strength.
  • As this happens, the articular (working) surfaces of the two bones lose contact with each other. The bones slowly separate as the soft tissues around the joint degenerate. The disease may affect one or both right and left hips.

With the loss of protective scaffolding between the bone surfaces, the nerves in the bone endings themselves become exposed. When bone touches bone, there is acute pain. In addition, the loss of tensile strength of the supporting tendons, muscle, and cartilage means that other structures in the hip and leg must compensate in terms of weight-bearing and movement. This unnatural compensation may cause fatigue and pain. It may even cause the dog to injure itself—running to catch a Frisbee, or climbing stairs, for instance.

What Causes Hip Dysplasia?

Experts disagree as to the source of hip dysplasia in dogs.

  • Too much food

    One theory is that feeding a young, growing dog too many calories early in its development contributes to the disorder.

  • Too much exercise

    Another theory is that too much exercise, or the wrong kind of exercise, or simply too much high-impact exercise, such as fetching, jumping, and catching a ball or Frisbee on concrete, contributes to hip dysplasia.

A factual observation about this condition is that hip dysplasia tends to affect large breeds more so than smaller dogs. This, too, is relative—it is possible for small dogs to become affected by hip dysplasia, too.  However, we correctly associate the condition most frequently with big breeds.

These breeds do carry a genetic predisposition toward the condition. It is also true that purebreds, especially large dogs, are most likely to become vulnerable to hip dysplasia, therefore calling upon informed and responsible breeding practices.

What You Can Do to Improve Your Dog’s Quality of Life

Our first instinct as dog lovers is to stop the pain. Sometimes our decision-making process is clouded by emotion—guilt, fear, even panic when we see our beloved canine companion suffering. Many conventional treatments for hip dysplasia in dogs have side effects, or simply don’t work.

1) Try Winston’s Joint System and Winston’s Pain Formula

A naturopathic doctor developed Winston’s Joint System and Winston’s Pain Formula. These offer support and relief for many conditions affecting your dog’s joints including hip dysplasia, arthritis, and inflammatory diseases. These are also common in dogs, attacking the cartilage, muscles, and membrane linings of cartilage and joints.

These may offer your dog safe alternatives: calming inflammation as an immediate solution and helping to rebuild joint integrity as a long-range treatment. These trusted products can slow or even stop the degeneration of the hip joint. In many cases, hip replacement surgery which is the last resort may be prevented altogether. For over 30 years, Winston’s formulas have helped thousands of dogs from all over the world.

2) Schedule a visit with your veterinarian

If your dog is clearly in pain, schedule a visit with your veterinarian. An X-ray examination will be recommended as a first step.

3) Monitor your dog’s weight

Obesity makes hip dysplasia worse. If your dog becomes less active, weight gain may become a challenge. Eliminate treats, and if possible, offer your dog low-impact exercises like stretching and swimming.

4) Remove unnecessary physical stressors from your dog’s life

5) Replace stairs with a ramp

While your dog is recovering, this prevents further damage to the damaged hip.

6) Provide a padded dog bed

Sleeping on a hard surface may increase the inflammation associated with hip dysplasia. A gel bed, which actually contains a soft jelly that conforms to your dog’s body, relieves pressure from sore joints.

7) Experiment with low-heat heating pads or fleece-covered hot water bottles

Together with gentle massages, these ways relax your dog and provide comfort during the healing process.

Is Your Dog Experiencing Hip Dysplasia or Other Forms of Pain? We Can Help

Does your dog have trouble walking, standing, or getting up? There is an excellent chance we can help your dog.

Since 1990, Winston’s Joint System and Winston’s Pain Formula have helped heal over twenty thousand dogs from all over the world. Our staff specializes in hip dysplasia, arthritis, and all joint pain & mobility issues.

To start your dog’s pain-free life, please contact us at www.dogshealth.com or call our toll-free number at 888-901-5557.

Hip Dysplasia in Dalmatians

Do you remember when a Dalmatian dog could be seen riding on a fire truck? Or how about the Disney film “101 Dalmatians”? I doubt that as you were watching these magnificent creatures you ever thought that there could be such a thing as hip dysplasia in Dalmatians.

Unfortunately, there is.

Hip Dysplasia in Dalmatians – What Is It?

Hip dysplasia is a degenerative condition, which can affect any dog. Although the causes may vary, the effects are always the same: loss of mobility, increasing pain, impaired gait, and even behavioral and mood changes in your dog (including snappishness and depression).

What Are the Signs of Hip Dysplasia in Dalmatians?

  • Hobbles, or walks/trots with an irregular gait
  • Tries to keep weight off one of the rear legs
  • Starts to slow down or limp on a favorite walk or run
  • Stays in bed instead of playing outdoors
  • Whimpers or yelps when climbing stairs
  • Flinches when the hip area or lower back are touched

What Happens in Hip Dysplasia – Why Does It Hurt?

Dysplasia is simply the dislocation of a bone from its proper place. “Plasia” is the Greek word for molding, so it’s easy to visualize an architectural form, like a beam or column, separating from its stabilizing molding.  Hip dysplasia or displacement is one of the best-known types of dysplasia in dogs.

The degenerative process of hip dysplasia is gradual. The onset of symptoms, specifically pain, is also somewhat gradual taking place over the course of years. In simple terms, the two bones of the hip joint shift out of alignment. The structure of a dog’s hip bones is similar to our human hip formation, consisting of a precisely fitted ball-and-socket joint. This is called a “spheroidal” joint, referring to the spherical head of the distal or articulating bone, which fit into the cup-like cavity of the accompanying bone.

Perhaps because they are such hand-working structures, the ball and socket joints are prone to disease, and simple mechanical wear and damage over time.

Here’s what we’ve learned so far:

  • Hip dysplasia results in several symptoms which reduce mobility and cause pain.
  • The muscles and joints become lax, and the joint capsule, a strong band of connective tissue which circled the bones for added stability, loses its elastic strength.
  • As this happens, the articular (working) surfaces of the two bones lose contact with each other. The bones slowly separate as the soft tissues around the joint degenerate. The disease may affect one or both right and left hips.

With the loss of protective scaffolding between the bone surfaces, the nerves in the bone endings themselves become exposed. When bone touches bone, there is acute pain. In addition, the loss of tensile strength of the supporting tendons, muscle, and cartilage means that other structures in the hip and leg must compensate in terms of weight-bearing and movement. This unnatural compensation may cause fatigue and pain. It may even cause the dog to injure itself—running to catch a Frisbee, or climbing stairs, for instance.

What Causes Hip Dysplasia?

Experts disagree as to the source of hip dysplasia in dogs.

  • Too much food

    One theory is that feeding a young, growing dog too many calories early in its development contributes to the disorder.

  • Too much exercise

    Another theory is that too much exercise, or the wrong kind of exercise, or simply too much high-impact exercise, such as fetching, jumping, and catching a ball or Frisbee on concrete, contributes to hip dysplasia.

A factual observation about this condition is that hip dysplasia tends to affect large breeds more so than smaller dogs. This, too, is relative—it is possible for small dogs to become affected by hip dysplasia, too.  However, we correctly associate the condition most frequently with big breeds.

These breeds do carry a genetic predisposition toward the condition. It is also true that purebreds, especially large dogs, are most likely to become vulnerable to hip dysplasia, therefore calling upon informed and responsible breeding practices.

What You Can Do to Improve Your Dog’s Quality of Life

Our first instinct as dog lovers is to stop the pain. Sometimes our decision-making process is clouded by emotion—guilt, fear, even panic when we see our beloved canine companion suffering. Many conventional treatments for hip dysplasia in dogs have side effects, or simply don’t work.

1) Try Winston’s Joint System and Winston’s Pain Formula

A naturopathic doctor developed Winston’s Joint System and Winston’s Pain Formula. These offer support and relief for many conditions affecting your dog’s joints including hip dysplasia, arthritis, and inflammatory diseases. These are also common in dogs, attacking the cartilage, muscles, and membrane linings of cartilage and joints.

These may offer your dog safe alternatives: calming inflammation as an immediate solution and helping to rebuild joint integrity as a long-range treatment. These trusted products can slow or even stop the degeneration of the hip joint. In many cases, hip replacement surgery which is the last resort may be prevented altogether. For over 30 years, Winston’s formulas have helped thousands of dogs from all over the world.

2) Schedule a visit with your veterinarian

If your dog is clearly in pain, schedule a visit with your veterinarian. An X-ray examination will be recommended as a first step.

3) Monitor your dog’s weight

Obesity makes hip dysplasia worse. If your dog becomes less active, weight gain may become a challenge. Eliminate treats, and if possible, offer your dog low-impact exercises like stretching and swimming.

4) Remove unnecessary physical stressors from your dog’s life

5) Replace stairs with a ramp

While your dog is recovering, this prevents further damage to the damaged hip.

6) Provide a padded dog bed

Sleeping on a hard surface may increase the inflammation associated with hip dysplasia. A gel bed, which actually contains a soft jelly that conforms to your dog’s body, relieves pressure from sore joints.

7) Experiment with low-heat heating pads or fleece-covered hot water bottles

Together with gentle massages, these ways relax your dog and provide comfort during the healing process.

Is Your Dog Experiencing Hip Dysplasia or Other Forms of Pain?

We Can Help.

Does your dog have trouble walking, standing, or getting up? There is an excellent chance we can help your dog.

Since 1990, Winston’s Joint System and Winston’s Pain Formula have helped heal over twenty thousand dogs from all over the world. Our staff specializes in hip dysplasia, arthritis, and all joint pain & mobility issues.

To start your dog’s pain-free life, please contact us at www.dogshealth.com or call our toll-free number at 888-901-5557.

Hip Dysplasia in Pugs

Although it is not very common to find hip dysplasia in Pugs, it still is one of the diseases that a Pug owner should be aware of.

Hip Dysplasia in Pugs – What Is It?

Hip dysplasia is a degenerative condition, which can affect any dog. Although the causes may vary, the effects are always the same: loss of mobility, increasing pain, impaired gait, and even behavioral and mood changes in your dog (including snappishness and depression).

What Are the Signs of Hip Dysplasia in Pugs?

  • Hobbles, or walks/trots with an irregular gait
  • Tries to keep weight off one of the rear legs
  • Starts to slow down or limp on a favorite walk or run
  • Stays in bed instead of playing outdoors
  • Whimpers or yelps when climbing stairs
  • Flinches when the hip area or lower back are touched

What Happens in Hip Dysplasia – Why Does It Hurt?

Dysplasia is simply the dislocation of a bone from its proper place. “Plasia” is the Greek word for molding, so it’s easy to visualize an architectural form, like a beam or column, separating from its stabilizing molding.  Hip dysplasia or displacement is one of the best-known types of dysplasia in dogs.

The degenerative process of hip dysplasia is gradual. The onset of symptoms, specifically pain, is also somewhat gradual taking place over the course of years. In simple terms, the two bones of the hip joint shift out of alignment. The structure of a dog’s hip bones is similar to our human hip formation, consisting of a precisely fitted ball-and-socket joint. This is called a “spheroidal” joint, referring to the spherical head of the distal or articulating bone, which fit into the cup-like cavity of the accompanying bone.

Perhaps because they are such hand-working structures, the ball and socket joints are prone to disease, and simple mechanical wear and damage over time.

Here’s what we’ve learned so far:

  • Hip dysplasia results in several symptoms which reduce mobility and cause pain.
  • The muscles and joints become lax, and the joint capsule, a strong band of connective tissue which circled the bones for added stability, loses its elastic strength.
  • As this happens, the articular (working) surfaces of the two bones lose contact with each other. The bones slowly separate as the soft tissues around the joint degenerate. The disease may affect one or both right and left hips.

With the loss of protective scaffolding between the bone surfaces, the nerves in the bone endings themselves become exposed. When bone touches bone, there is acute pain. In addition, the loss of tensile strength of the supporting tendons, muscle, and cartilage means that other structures in the hip and leg must compensate in terms of weight-bearing and movement. This unnatural compensation may cause fatigue and pain. It may even cause the dog to injure itself—running to catch a Frisbee, or climbing stairs, for instance.

What Causes Hip Dysplasia?

Experts disagree as to the source of hip dysplasia in dogs.

  • Too much food

    One theory is that feeding a young, growing dog too many calories early in its development contributes to the disorder.

  • Too much exercise

    Another theory is that too much exercise, or the wrong kind of exercise, or simply too much high-impact exercise, such as fetching, jumping, and catching a ball or Frisbee on concrete, contributes to hip dysplasia.

A factual observation about this condition is that hip dysplasia tends to affect large breeds more so than smaller dogs. This, too, is relative—it is possible for small dogs to become affected by hip dysplasia, too.  However, we correctly associate the condition most frequently with big breeds.

These breeds do carry a genetic predisposition toward the condition. It is also true that purebreds, especially large dogs, are most likely to become vulnerable to hip dysplasia, therefore calling upon informed and responsible breeding practices.

What You Can Do to Improve Your Dog’s Quality of Life

Our first instinct as dog lovers is to stop the pain. Sometimes our decision-making process is clouded by emotion—guilt, fear, even panic when we see our beloved canine companion suffering. Many conventional treatments for hip dysplasia in dogs have side effects, or simply don’t work.

1) Try Winston’s Joint System and Winston’s Pain Formula

A naturopathic doctor developed Winston’s Joint System and Winston’s Pain Formula. These offer support and relief for many conditions affecting your dog’s joints including hip dysplasia, arthritis, and inflammatory diseases. These are also common in dogs, attacking the cartilage, muscles, and membrane linings of cartilage and joints.

These may offer your dog safe alternatives: calming inflammation as an immediate solution and helping to rebuild joint integrity as a long-range treatment. These trusted products can slow or even stop the degeneration of the hip joint. In many cases, hip replacement surgery which is the last resort may be prevented altogether. For over 30 years, Winston’s formulas have helped thousands of dogs from all over the world.

2) Schedule a visit with your veterinarian

If your dog is clearly in pain, schedule a visit with your veterinarian. An X-ray examination will be recommended as a first step.

3) Monitor your dog’s weight

Obesity makes hip dysplasia worse. If your dog becomes less active, weight gain may become a challenge. Eliminate treats, and if possible, offer your dog low-impact exercises like stretching and swimming.

4) Remove unnecessary physical stressors from your dog’s life

5) Replace stairs with a ramp

While your dog is recovering, this prevents further damage to the damaged hip.

6) Provide a padded dog bed

Sleeping on a hard surface may increase the inflammation associated with hip dysplasia. A gel bed, which actually contains a soft jelly that conforms to your dog’s body, relieves pressure from sore joints.

7) Experiment with low-heat heating pads or fleece-covered hot water bottles

Together with gentle massages, these ways relax your dog and provide comfort during the healing process.

Is Your Dog Experiencing Hip Dysplasia or Other Forms of Pain?

We Can Help.

Does your dog have trouble walking, standing, or getting up? There is an excellent chance we can help your dog.

Since 1990, Winston’s Joint System and Winston’s Pain Formula have helped heal over twenty thousand dogs from all over the world. Our staff specializes in hip dysplasia, arthritis, and all joint pain & mobility issues.

To start your dog’s pain-free life, please contact us at www.dogshealth.com or call our toll-free number at 888-901-5557.

Hip Dysplasia in Rottweilers

Hip Dysplasia in Rottweilers – What Is It?

Hip dysplasia is a degenerative condition, which can affect any dog. Although the causes may vary, the effects are always the same: loss of mobility, increasing pain, impaired gait, and even behavioral and mood changes in your dog (including snappishness and depression).

What Are the Signs of Hip Dysplasia in Rottweilers?

  • Hobbles, or walks/trots with an irregular gait
  • Tries to keep weight off one of the rear legs
  • Starts to slow down or limp on a favorite walk or run
  • Stays in bed instead of playing outdoors
  • Whimpers or yelps when climbing stairs
  • Flinches when the hip area or lower back are touched

What Happens in Hip Dysplasia – Why Does It Hurt?

Dysplasia is simply the dislocation of a bone from its proper place. “Plasia” is the Greek word for molding, so it’s easy to visualize an architectural form, like a beam or column, separating from its stabilizing molding.  Hip dysplasia or displacement is one of the best-known types of dysplasia in dogs.

The degenerative process of hip dysplasia is gradual. The onset of symptoms, specifically pain, is also somewhat gradual taking place over the course of years. In simple terms, the two bones of the hip joint shift out of alignment. The structure of a dog’s hip bones is similar to our human hip formation, consisting of a precisely fitted ball-and-socket joint. This is called a “spheroidal” joint, referring to the spherical head of the distal or articulating bone, which fit into the cup-like cavity of the accompanying bone.

Perhaps because they are such hand-working structures, the ball and socket joints are prone to disease, and simple mechanical wear and damage over time.

Here’s what we’ve learned so far:

  • Hip dysplasia results in several symptoms which reduce mobility and cause pain.
  • The muscles and joints become lax, and the joint capsule, a strong band of connective tissue which circled the bones for added stability, loses its elastic strength.
  • As this happens, the articular (working) surfaces of the two bones lose contact with each other. The bones slowly separate as the soft tissues around the joint degenerate. The disease may affect one or both right and left hips.

With the loss of protective scaffolding between the bone surfaces, the nerves in the bone endings themselves become exposed. When bone touches bone, there is acute pain. In addition, the loss of tensile strength of the supporting tendons, muscle, and cartilage means that other structures in the hip and leg must compensate in terms of weight-bearing and movement. This unnatural compensation may cause fatigue and pain. It may even cause the dog to injure itself—running to catch a Frisbee, or climbing stairs, for instance.

What Causes Hip Dysplasia?

Experts disagree as to the source of hip dysplasia in dogs.

  • Too much food

    One theory is that feeding a young, growing dog too many calories early in its development contributes to the disorder.

  • Too much exercise

    Another theory is that too much exercise, or the wrong kind of exercise, or simply too much high-impact exercise, such as fetching, jumping, and catching a ball or Frisbee on concrete, contributes to hip dysplasia.

A factual observation about this condition is that hip dysplasia tends to affect large breeds more so than smaller dogs. This, too, is relative—it is possible for small dogs to become affected by hip dysplasia, too.  However, we correctly associate the condition most frequently with big breeds.

These breeds do carry a genetic predisposition toward the condition. It is also true that purebreds, especially large dogs, are most likely to become vulnerable to hip dysplasia, therefore calling upon informed and responsible breeding practices.

What You Can Do to Improve Your Dog’s Quality of Life

Our first instinct as dog lovers is to stop the pain. Sometimes our decision-making process is clouded by emotion—guilt, fear, even panic when we see our beloved canine companion suffering. Many conventional treatments for hip dysplasia in dogs have side effects, or simply don’t work.

1) Try Winston’s Joint System and Winston’s Pain Formula

A naturopathic doctor developed Winston’s Joint System and Winston’s Pain Formula. These offer support and relief for many conditions affecting your dog’s joints including hip dysplasia, arthritis, and inflammatory diseases. These are also common in dogs, attacking the cartilage, muscles, and membrane linings of cartilage and joints.

These may offer your dog safe alternatives: calming inflammation as an immediate solution and helping to rebuild joint integrity as a long-range treatment. These trusted products can slow or even stop the degeneration of the hip joint. In many cases, hip replacement surgery which is the last resort may be prevented altogether. For over 30 years, Winston’s formulas have helped thousands of dogs from all over the world.

2) Schedule a visit with your veterinarian

If your dog is clearly in pain, schedule a visit with your veterinarian. An X-ray examination will be recommended as a first step.

3) Monitor your dog’s weight

Obesity makes hip dysplasia worse. If your dog becomes less active, weight gain may become a challenge. Eliminate treats, and if possible, offer your dog low-impact exercises like stretching and swimming.

4) Remove unnecessary physical stressors from your dog’s life

5) Replace stairs with a ramp

While your dog is recovering, this prevents further damage to the damaged hip.

6) Provide a padded dog bed

Sleeping on a hard surface may increase the inflammation associated with hip dysplasia. A gel bed, which actually contains a soft jelly that conforms to your dog’s body, relieves pressure from sore joints.

7) Experiment with low-heat heating pads or fleece-covered hot water bottles

Together with gentle massages, these ways relax your dog and provide comfort during the healing process.

Is Your Dog Experiencing Hip Dysplasia or Other Forms of Pain?

We Can Help.

Does your dog have trouble walking, standing, or getting up? There is an excellent chance we can help your dog.

Since 1990, Winston’s Joint System and Winston’s Pain Formula have helped heal over twenty thousand dogs from all over the world. Our staff specializes in hip dysplasia, arthritis, and all joint pain & mobility issues.

To start your dog’s pain-free life, please contact us at www.dogshealth.com or call our toll-free number at 888-901-5557.