Sudden Aggression in Dogs

Aggressive dog behavior may take the form of growling, snarling, snapping, biting or lunging at people. It’s very important to determine what is causing the sudden aggression in a dog.

Aggression in dogs can be caused by behavioral issues, medical conditions or both. If a dog suddenly begins to display signs of aggression or hostility, you’ll need to know the cause, or causes, before attempting to help your dog.

Hypothyroidism can sometimes cause a dog to behave aggressively. Hypothyroidism is a medical condition in dogs that causes the thyroid gland to produce less than the normal amount of thyroid hormone. The symptoms of hypothyroidism in dogs can include weight gain, loss of energy, hair loss and sudden aggressive behavior.

When a dog is suffering from congenital or neurological problems, it may display aggressive behavior. A neurological problem caused by illness or injury can affect a dog’s judgment and behavior.

Trauma to a dog’s head, epilepsy and brain tumors can also cause sudden aggression and abnormal behavior in dogs.

Seizures that occur in the region of the brain that contributes to aggression can cause sudden behavioral problems in a dog. Certain breeds of dogs are more prone to this condition. The breeds include Cocker Spaniels, Golden Retrievers, Bull Terriers, Poodles, and Springer Spaniels.

The symptoms of this type of aggression include a sudden change of mood before a seizure, the sudden onset of violent or hostile behavior, dilated pupils, heavy salivating, and aggressive posture. After an aggressive seizure a dog may appear lethargic, sleepy, or depressed.

Obviously, aggressive behavior in a dog must be diagnosed as soon as possible because it usually will continue to get worse and it could also be a sign of something more serious. Contact your veterinarian as soon as you begin noticing any sudden changes in your dog’s behavior or the signs of aggression.

The underlying cause of the problem will have to be diagnosed before any treatment can be planned. The vet will determine what type of treatment is necessary depending on the exact cause of the aggression.

If you have children or other pets, their well-being, or even their lives, could be in danger if the aggressive dog is not diagnosed and treated.

Does Your Dog Have Trouble:

  • Walking?
  • Standing?
  • Getting up?

 

Prozac For Dogs?

Prozac or its generic Fluoxetine is increasingly being prescribed by veterinarians across the country to treat behavioral problems in dogs like fear aggression and separation anxiety. This practice of prescribing human medications for dogs has created a lot of controversies because many dogs don’t respond to this type of medication and will experience intense side effects.

Unfortunately, behavioral problems are one of the main reasons dogs are euthanized in animal shelters or surrendered to dog rescue groups by their owners.

Prozac, or Fluoxetine, is an antidepressant that increases serotonin levels in the brain. It is frequently administered to dogs for treating separation anxiety, aggression, and other anxiety-related issues.

Prozac is usually prescribed in combination with a behavior modification program. Once the anxiety or fear levels diminish, dogs are able to learn the necessary skills to help them cope with the object or situation that is triggering their anxiety. For this reason, Prozac is often prescribed for a short period of time until the behavior modification program takes hold.

Veterinarians will start a dog on a small dose of Prozac that is less than the dog needs and then gradually increases the dosage. Increases in dosage need to be done cautiously because any sudden increase or decrease in the dosage of Prozac can cause severe behavior changes in a dog.

Prozac has some serious side effects for dogs and cannot be given to a dog taking any of the following medications: monoamine oxidase inhibitors, diazepam, phenylbutazone, digoxine, or buspirone (a generic of Buspar, a psychoactive drug used to treat anxiety disorders such as severe anxiety separation issues).

Any dog who has a history of seizures should never be given Prozac and dogs on Prozac for a long period of time will need to have their liver and kidney enzymes checked regularly as long-term use can cause damage to these vital organs.

The most common side effects that dogs experience on Prozac are changes in appetite, weight gain or loss, lethargy, weakness in the limbs, or diarrhea. Unwelcome behavioral side effects include anxiety, panic attacks, hostility and aggression, restlessness, irritability, hyperactivity, trouble sleeping, or increased depression.

Some additional serious side effects that require a veterinarian exam are tremors, muscle twitching or stiffness, problems with balance or coordination, confusion, or a very rapid heartbeat. Some dogs also develop allergic reactions that cause a skin rash or hives, difficulty breathing, or a swelling of the dog’s face, lips, tongue or throat. Any of these side effects necessitate immediate discontinuance of the Prozac.

Treatment with Prozac can sometimes be beneficial in improving problematic behavior in a dog, but any dog being treated with this medication is always at risk of numerous side effects and must be watched carefully for any indications of a problem.

Does Your Dog Have Trouble:

  • Walking?
  • Standing?
  • Getting up?

 

Stopping Dog Biting

If you have a dog that sometimes bites other dogs or even people occasionally, stopping your dog from biting may not be as easy as you think.

Biting problems begin when a young puppy gently bites its litter mates, people, and objects in an effort to explore the world surrounding it. If an owner doesn’t teach a young puppy that biting is unacceptable behavior, the puppy will continue the behavior when it becomes an adult. Some adult dogs will bite out of aggression and can cause serious injury to another dog or a human. Thankfully, there are ways to modify the behaviors that lead to biting.

When a young puppy bites its mother during nursing or bites another puppy with too much pressure during playtime, the result is a high pitched yelp. If you are playing with your puppy and it bites you, make a high pitched sound as if you were in pain. The puppy should back off and appear to be concerned. If the puppy continues to bite after you have “yelped” loudly, immediately stop playing with it and walk away. This will cause your puppy to associate biting with the removal of your attention and it should begin learning to bite less. With proper training, puppies will grow out of their biting habit between six months and one year.

Petco and PetSmart sell products such as Bitter Apple Spray that you can rub on your hands just before playing with your puppy. The sprays are harmless but taste awful to your puppy, and will deter it from biting you. If your puppy is teething it will often bite because teething is painful. If this is the case, give your puppy safe, durable toys specifically made for puppies to chew on.

Sometimes it’s necessary to stop older dogs from biting. A dog who is adopted when it’s older, or a puppy who has been allowed to bite while young, probably have not had proper training and are biting out of fear or aggression. It is absolutely necessary that your dog understands you are the “alpha” in the pack and you are in charge.

Biting is never acceptable in a pet and stopping dog biting should be way up on your list of things to teach a new (or old) dog. If you find that you are unable to break this habit in your pet, find a private dog trainer or suitable obedience school to help your dog quit its biting habit before another dog or a person are seriously injured.

Does Your Dog Have Trouble:

  • Walking?
  • Standing?
  • Getting up?

 

Why Dogs Sleep So Much

If you’re concerned that your pet dog may be sleeping too much and there might be something wrong with it, you’ll first need to determine whether it really is sleeping more than what’s normal for its age and activity level.

Why dogs sleep so much

Why dogs sleep so much is a common question new dog owners often ask their friends who’ve had dogs for some time.

Dogs sleep more than humans do, but they also wake up more frequently than we do. How much they sleep depends a lot upon their level of activity.

A dog living in a home as a pet will sleep more than a dog that works for a living – like a search and rescue dog, or a dog working on a ranch or farm. Dogs are able to adjust their sleep pattern so that they can be awake when there’s something to do, and can easily sleep the rest of the time.

Many indoor dogs will sometimes sleep out of simple boredom. If you suspect your dog is bored, you can give it ample stimulation during the day by giving it lots of toys to play with or take it on several walks. If your dog has enough to do during the day, it will usually stay awake during the day and then sleep at night when you do.

Sleep patterns

Dogs have the same sleep patterns as humans.

When your dog first goes to sleep, it enters the slow wave or quiet phase of sleep. It will lie quite still and is oblivious to its surroundings. The breathing slows, the blood pressure and body temperature drop, and the heart rate decreases.

After about ten minutes, your dog enters the rapid eye movement (REM) or active stage of sleep. Its eyes will roll under its closed lids, and it may bark or whine or jerk its legs. During this stage, the brain activity is similar to that seen during the dreaming phase of human sleep, and many vets and pet owners agree that this is evidence that dogs have dreams.

Adult dogs spend about 10 to 12 percent of their sleeping time in REM sleep. Puppies spend a greater proportion of their sleep time in REM.

Larger dogs sleep so much more than smaller ones who generally have a tendency to always be alert for anything that allows them to start a round of loud and seemingly uncontrollable barking.

Older senior dogs always sleep more than younger dogs, and 20 hours or more a day of sleeping does not mean an old dog is ill; they’re just tired out.

Medical conditions causing dogs to sleep too much

Although all dogs begin to slow down and rest more as they grow older, there are some medical conditions that may cause your dog to sleep too much.

• Many veterinarians believe that dogs can get depressed just as humans can. Canine depression can be the result of a chemical imbalance in the brain but more often is caused by a sudden change in the dog’s routine, such as moving to a new home, being adopted, or losing a long-time companion – human or animal. The primary symptoms of canine depression are an increased amount of time spent sleeping, decreased activity, lethargy, decreased appetite and weight loss.

• When a dog has hypothyroidism, the thyroid gland doesn’t produce enough T3 and T4 hormones, causing a decrease in metabolic function. Most of the time this is an autoimmune response that attacks the thyroid, but it can also be caused by other conditions, such as cancer. The decrease in metabolic function causes the whole body to slow down resulting in excess sleepiness and lethargy. Other symptoms may include weight gain, anemia, hair loss, skin and coat disorders, decreased heart rate, and an intolerance to cold weather.

Juvenile-onset diabetes occurs infrequently in dogs and principally affects older dogs, particularly females. Dogs who have diabetes display symptoms including sleepiness, lethargy, increased thirst, frequent urination, weight loss, and occasional blindness. Treatment is the same as for humans with diabetes: insulin injections. Some breeds such as schnauzers, small terriers, and poodles are at increased risk for diabetes, as are obese dogs.

• There are many infectious diseases that can cause your dog to sleep so much or act lethargic. These diseases include rabies, distemper, parvovirus, Rocky Mountain spotted fever and Lyme disease. Most infectious diseases that cause lethargy and sleepiness are accompanied by a variety of other symptoms that are often more easy to diagnose.

Since 1990, Winston’s Joint System and Winston’s Pain Formula have helped heal over twenty thousand dogs from all over the world. Our staff specializes in hip dysplasia, arthritis and all joint, pain and mobility issues.

There is an excellent chance we can help your dog, so please contact us or call our toll free number at 888-901-5557.

Does Your Dog Have Trouble:

  • Walking?
  • Standing?
  • Getting up?

 

 

When Dogs Behave Badly

Is your dog protecting you or is it just behaving badly?

There are many behavioral problems in dogs that make us wonder “why is my dog doing that? What causes my dog to act like that and what can I do to stop its bad behavior?” Here are some of the worst behavioral problems displayed by dogs:

Destructive behavior is one of the most common complaints from dog owners. When your pet dog continues to urinate on your expensive rug or carpet, chews up shoes left lying around, or destroys clothing belonging to a family member, it makes everyone involved unhappy. Destructive behavior can have many causes, including separation anxiety. If you are away from home for many hours during the day, and your dog demonstrates destructive behavior, you must be careful that any punishment be administered at the proper time. If you come home and find the dog has chewed something it was not supposed to, don’t punish the dog then. The dog will not be able to associate its act of destruction with the punishment because it will not understand exactly why you are upset. It will act ‘guilty’ because it knows you’re upset, but will not be able to associate your anger with its act of destruction. Don’t punish a dog for its bad behavior unless you catch it in the act.

Another reason for destructive behavior is lack of environmental stimulation. Boredom is often the cause of destructive behavior, especially in puppies or large dogs that are not receiving adequate exercise. All dogs need environmental stimulation. You might consider getting a second pet dog to keep it company when you’re away from home, or you could buy interesting toys to entertain your dog during your absence.

Destructive behavior can also arise if you punish your dog by penning it in a closed room or a fenced yard. Your dog may be inclined to break through a fence or may destroy your door frame or door knobs.

To treat destructive problems in your pet, you must establish the exact cause of its behavior and make necessary changes. For example, if a young dog chews furniture but not doors, it is probably in need of more environmental stimulation. Try increasing the amount of time of its exercising, adopt another dog as its companion, or leave the TV or radio on when you are away from home.

Preventing bad behavior from developing is easier than treating it after your pet acquires it. Puppy owners should not give a new puppy old shoes or a piece of rug to chew on because the puppy will not be able to differentiate between old tennis shoes and your good leather shoes. Dog toys should be of the type that your dog can easily distinguish as being different from objects you don’t want chewed up.

Aggression is also a common complaint from dog owners and is usually a serious threat to public safety. Biting should never be encouraged when a dog is still a puppy because it will grow up believing that type of behavior is acceptable.

Excessive barking can really bug your neighbors as well as you. To cure your dog of this bad behavior, determine where and when, or at what it is barking. If it happens only when it’s out in the backyard alone, you should keep the dog indoors and only take it outside when on a leash. It is common for dogs to bark at strangers or visitors to the house. This is due to territorial behavior and the dog is simply protecting its property and you. You need to teach your dog to stop inappropriate barking by using positive reinforcement to modify its behavior. When your dog barks, call it over or command it to sit and reward it with a tasty treat. Negative punishment does not work in these instances because it can cause fear in the dog, which can make the barking problem worse.

Digging holes under your fence is usually the result of the dog trying to escape from your yard. Dogs will also dig holes to keep cool or to catch rodents. Place chicken wire where your dog likes to dig to discourage digging. If the dog is a natural digger like a Terrier then digging is part of its genetic makeup. You might consider marking off an area where the dog is allowed to dig. If your lawn also looks unsightly because your dog’s continuing urination causes your lawn to look like a hodge-podge of green and brown spots, try Lawn Aid, a formula designed to balance your dog’s urine pH to prevent unsightly discoloration of your lawn. The combination of Cranberry, Yucca, DL-Methionine and Brewer’s Yeast will help keep your grass green all season long. The Cranberry Extract in this perfectly balanced formula also supports proper urinary tract health.

Jumping up on people is a common behavioral problem that is usually minor, unless the dog is very large or you have small children. The dog will continue jumping up on people because it wants attention. The best way to stop this is to train the dog that jumping up will result in not getting any attention. You should ignore your dog completely when it attempts to jump up on you. Look up and fold your arms across your chest so the dog receives no physical or visual contact from you. Calmly command your dog to sit down. Once it sits, you should reward it with attention. You must be consistent and other family members also need to participate in this training. Your dog will soon learn that jumping up gets it no attention.

When a dog behaves badly try to put yourself in its place and ask “What is happening with the dog, or to it, that would drive

    me

batty or cause

    me

to demonstrate bad behavior too?

 

Best Dog Breeds For Families With Kids

Almost 75 million dogs have been adopted into homes that already owned at least one dog. Multi-dog homes are often good for families with kids. There are other dogs to play with so a dog is not expecting constant attention from your children, or you, all the time, and there is always another dog to play with when the family is away from home.

If you’re considering adopting your very first dog or you want to replace a cherished pet that is no longer with you, it can sometimes be difficult finding the right dog for your family. All dogs are not created equal and each breed has specific traits that may or may not fit into your family situation.Deciding which dog will make the best pet for your children depends on several things. One being whether someone in the family will have the time to give the dog plenty of exercise. You also need to consider whether a small, quiet dog or a larger, active dog fits the lifestyle of you and your children. Do you have a large home or a home with a yard? Will there be someone at home most of the time?

Answering these questions can help you decide on which breed of dog is best suited to your family’s lifestyle.

Where to find your pet is also an important consideration. Some people prefer to buy a dog from a breeder if they are searching for a purebred. But if you just want the best companion dog you can find for your family, an animal shelter or pet adoption center is probably your best choice. Pet adoption agencies and animal shelters help find homes for loving animals that have, for any number of reasons, ended up neglected, unloved, or unwanted.

The dog of your dreams may right now be living an unhappy, solitary life in the confines of an animal shelter cage. These dogs are so happy to be rescued and given a second chance at life, that they will heap loads of love on your children. Ask the staff at an animal shelter or pet adoption center to help you determine which breed of dog is right for your family.

The following breeds of dogs will provide excellent companionship, loyalty and love:

Labrador Retrievers are the most popular dog breed of all. Labrador Retrievers are friendly, lovable, smart and great with kids. They are the most popular family dog according to breeder surveys.

Golden Retrievers make great family dogs. These large dogs are extremely kind and gentle by nature and they love to play with people of any age. They can also entertain themselves with their toys so they’re not always bothering a member of the household. Just make sure you have enough space in your home as Golden Retrievers can grow to be as large as 90 pounds.

Yorkshire Terriers, also called “Yorkies” for short, are the smallest terriers of all. These tiny dogs are energetic and very protective of their owners, both adults and children. As a result, they don’t always get along well with strangers and they’re not afraid to let a visitor know. Expect a lot of “yapping” if you adopt one of these dogs.

German Shepherds are one of the most intelligent and loyal dog breeds in the world. Because of their high intelligence and great strength they make a great family pet as long as you have room for a large, lovable dog.

The Beagle has been a popular breed for over a century. These cute, lovable dogs were originally raised as hunting dogs and are known for being kind and gentle. They make great family pets.

Dachshunds are also called “wiener dogs’ and have always been a favorite with adults and children because of their cute, sausage-shaped bodies. With long bodies and short legs they look like they couldn’t move very fast but they love to run and play with their owners and each other. They can be very protective and may nip at strangers and other dogs.

Boxers play well with children, are extremely loyal and are low maintenance. They aren’t the most intelligent dogs, but they make up for it by being energetic, headstrong, and fun-loving. They require strong obedience training while they’re young or they may turn out to be unmanageable when they grow into adults.

Poodles come in both standard and miniature sizes. They are popular dogs and are beautiful, loyal and extremely intelligent.

Miniature Schnauzers are smart, obedient and enjoy non-aggressive play with children and adults. They make great pets if you’re looking for a small, lovable dog.

The best dog breed for families with kids is ultimately a personal decision that you as a parent must make. If possible, help save the life of a dog confined to a shelter or pet adoption facility. You’ll never regret the love and devotion a rescued animal will give you and your children.

How to Stop A Puppy From Barking

Stopping a puppy from barking can be a difficult task, simply because barking is a natural form of communication for puppies. Puppies bark for many reasons: attention seeking, anxiety, boredom or just playing. Puppies and barking are a natural combination.

If you can establish the reasons why a puppy is barking so much, it will be easier to find a solution to the problem.

To figure out why your puppy is barking uncontrollably you first need to determine the situations or conditions that precede an episode of barking. If your puppy is barking at you, it’s usually trying to get your attention. If this is the case, just ignore it and avoid eye contact. When the puppy stops barking you can shower it with all the attention you want.

Don’t talk to your puppy while it’s barking at you and don’t relent and give in if the barking continues. If you do give in, the undesirable behavior will be implanted in the puppy’s brain as the best way to get your attention whenever it wants something.

If a puppy continues to bark while standing over its food bowl it’s just letting you know that it’s guarding its food. Puppies who bark for no discernible reason may simply be frustrated or bored.

If left alone, a puppy often becomes anxious and will bark continuously until its human returns. If you find out that your puppy barks a lot while you’re gone from the house it could be anxious about being alone, it could be bored, or there may be something disturbing it like dogs barking outside or noisy cars and trucks.

If you make your puppy’s surroundings more interesting the unwelcome barking may end. You can also give your puppy different toys to play with every few days, and be sure it gets a lot of exercise. If the puppy barks a lot and seems bored when you’re home try spending a little more time playing with it and giving it the attention it craves.

Stopping a puppy from barking too much will help calm shattered nerves, whether they’re yours or the next door neighbor’s.

Jack Russell Terrier Training Tips

Jack Russell terrier training is essential, especially if you adopt a Jack Russell when it’s a puppy. Like most terriers, Jack Russells were bred to hunt and kill rodents and they have a lot of energy. Because of that energy, they require a lot of exercise, training and mental stimulation to live peacefully in a family situation without driving everyone crazy with their antics.

During adolescence Jack Russells have loads of energy, and it’s almost impossible to train one unless it’s getting the proper amount of exercise; this means up to an hour and a half of active running each and every day.

If not allowed to run full bore and burn up excess energy, Jack Russells will find things to do – things like tearing up cushions on sofas and chairs, ripping up plants in the garden, and chewing on every shoe in the house. It’s easy to understand why an owner needs to be sure that a Jack Russell terrier gets a lot of outdoor exercise.

Jack Russell terriers are easily distracted, and without exercise, those distractions can result in non-stop barking, in the house and outdoors as well.

Jack Russell terriers were bred to be diggers as most rodents live underground. If you don’t want your garden or yard dug up every week, you might want to put a sand box in your back yard and let the dog’s natural instincts for digging take over. You may need to put some of the dog’s toys and bones in the sandbox to spur it’s digging activities.

To stop a Jack Russell from chewing on everything in your house, you’ll have to limit the dog’s access to certain areas of the house during the day when no one is home. When family members are home they can guide the dog away from items you don’t want it to chew on and redirect it to things that are okay to chew on.

The most effective way to accomplish this is to teach the dog a “Leave it” command by holding several treats. Give the dog a couple of treats while saying “Take it.” Then close your fist and say, “Leave it.” Wait for the barking to stop, then give praise and reward with a treat.

Once the Jack Russell learns to obey these commands, you can start practicing with objects the dog likes to chew but should not be messing with. These could be shoes, remote TV controls, or anything lying around the house that seems to be irresistible to the dog’s attention. When the dog obeys your command to leave the object alone, reward it with a treat or one of its chewing toys.

These dogs make great pets, but instituting Jack Russell terrier training and seeing that it has plenty of exercise, will make them a welcome addition to almost any family.

 

Do Dogs Grieve

It may surprise you to know that dogs grieve over the loss of a companion also, whether the companion was a human or another dog.

Humans go through five stages of grief when a loved one dies. These stages were identified by Dr. Elizabeth Kubler Ross as denial, isolation, anger, depression, bargaining, and finally acceptance. Humans don’t necessarily pass through all five stages, or in the same order, because people deal with the loss of someone dear in many different ways.

If your dog has suffered from the loss of a beloved human or canine companion, it isn’t possible to explain to them what has happened or why their human or pet will never return. A dog often becomes confused and has feelings of separation and abandonment. In a dog’s world, all they know is one minute their beloved companion was here and the next minute they are gone.

They frequently express their feelings of abandonment through either one, all, or any combination of denial/isolation, anger, depression, and eventually acceptance.

A dog will grieve over a loss like humans do, but people are usually so caught up in their own sorrow that they fail to see that their pet is also stricken with heartache. Since dogs cannot communicate verbally, we can’t make them understand what has happened by engaging them in conversation. As a responsible dog owner you can offer support and compassion to your remaining pet or pets, and help them pass through the grieving stages as painlessly as possible.

The depth of an animal’s grief generally relates to the strength and duration of the relationship with the deceased animal or person. As their keeper, we need to recognize this and help them pass through those stages as painlessly as possible. After accepting the loss of a companion in a reasonable amount of time, most dogs will recover and resume their regular life.

Dogs express their grief through their behavior. Some days, or every day for some dogs, you may find it sitting or standing patiently at the door waiting for the return of the loved one. Some dogs will hide under a bed, or refuse to leave a room that the loved one occupied. For the majority of dogs it may take several days or weeks to realize the person or dog they are waiting for is not returning to them.

Some dogs will not be interested in eating when they are going through a grieving period. If this happens encourage the dog to eat but don’t force it. When they get hungry enough, they will eat.

Some dogs express their grief by reverting to inappropriate behavior like barking, whining, or crying. To help your pet overcome feelings of grief, pay more attention to it than you normally do. Take it on long car rides, and visit the local dog park so your dog is surrounded by other dogs who aren’t going through any grieving.

Go for long walks together in new places your dog hasn’t been to before, or hasn’t visited in a long time. In the early stages of grieving don’t take it to any places where it used to go with the person or dog who is deceased.

After 4 to 6 months your pet will accept its new routines and schedules and its nature and temperament will return to what it was before it experienced the loss.

Dogs do grieve, so allow your dog a reasonable amount of time to mourn. As the primary guardian of your pet, it’s your responsibility to find new and exciting adventures for your dog so it can gradually return to a normal life.

Dominant Dogs

Dominant dog behavior usually develops over a period of time. Dominant dogs will often growl or bark at their owners when the dog’s demands aren’t being met.

If there are two or more dogs living in the same household, the dominant dog will be considered by the other dogs as the alpha dog, or leader of the pack. Such dominating dogs often try to gain leadership over their owners also.

To prevent this type of unwanted behavior you must learn how to recognize dominant dog behaviors and take steps to change those behaviors if you want to have an obedient and loving companion rather than a terrorizing monster running around your house.

Some of the symptoms of dominant behavior in dogs are similar to the symptoms of separation anxiety so it is important to distinguish between the two. To determine if your dog is really showing signs of dominating behavior you’ll have to find a way to monitor its behavior to see if it behaves in a dominating manner around other dogs or only when left alone.

If you notice any of the following symptoms of dominating dog behavior you may want to seek the assistance of a professional trainer who can train your dog to be more obedient. If you find that your dog’s disobedience and dominant behavior is resulting in biting and aggression, most trainers won’t work with your dog.

Some of the signs of dominant dogs are:
Always acting stubborn, barking loudly, consistently ignoring your commands, pushing ahead of you whenever you open a door in the house or to the outside, resistance to being walked with a leash, growling and barking when it doesn’t get its way or when corrected for doing something wrong.

It isn’t easy dealing with dominant dogs. If your dog disobeys you and growls at you when you try to correct it, don’t shout or express frustration. You have to remain calm and speak to it in a firm commanding tone.

Although it can be a daunting and challenging task to permanently change the behavior of a dominant dog, it is possible to successfully change your pet’s behavior if you remain calm and persistent at all times during any training sessions.