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Let us help put an end to your dog’s suffering, joint stiffness, pain, immobility, and poor quality of life. Our proven products will help you easily accomplish this without the use of drugs or invasive surgery.

Joint Issues

  • Hip Dysplasia
  • Arthritis
  • Osteochondritis (OCD)
  • Stiffness/Inflammation
  • Ligament Tears
  • Growing Pains
  • Mobility Problems
  • Joint Pain
  • Back/Spinal Problems
  • Hypertrophic Osteodystrophy (HOD)

Symptoms

Is your pet becoming less active, less playful, or desiring shorter walks? The following symptoms could be early signs of OCD, Arthritis or Hip Dysplasia.

  • Moving more slowly
  • Difficulty getting up
  • Weight shift to another leg
  • Personality change
  • Reluctant to walk, jump or play
  • Refuses using stairs or the car
  • Change in appetite
  • Change in behavior
  • Muscle atrophy
  • Lagging behind
  • Yelping when touched
  • Limping
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Posts Tagged ‘Weight Loss in Dogs’

What Should a Dog Eat?

Monday, June 6th, 2016


What should a dog eat and how do you know if you’re giving your pet the best diet possible? There are so many different types of diets available for dogs today – dry food, canned food, raw meats, cooked meats, turkey, vegetables, and specialty blends.

The diet that you feed your dog will have an effect on its physical health, its weight, and the luster and health of its coat. If the diet you feed your dog lacks in needed vitamins and minerals, your dog can become restless, irritable, and tire easily. Certain foods can also cause dogs to become overly excited or nervous.

To be sure your dog is eating the healthiest diet possible, you need the right combination of vitamins and minerals as well as the right amounts of protein and carbohydrates.

Should a dog eat meat? Humans don’t need to eat meat to stay healthy but dogs do. A nutritious, well-balanced dog food should contain approximately 40% meat (to provide the protein), 50% vegetables, and 10% carbohydrates. If a dog’s diet is lacking in sufficient amounts of protein it can cause weight loss, muscle wasting and slow growth in younger dogs. A diet lacking in vegetables can lead to vitamin deficiencies, and carbohydrates are important to keep a dog’s thyroid functioning properly.

To maintain a healthy balance of the essential vitamins, minerals, and amino acids a dog needs for optimum health, select a dog food that contains vitamins A, D, E, and K, as well as Vitamin B1, B6, and B12, riboflavin, niacin, pantothenic acid, folic acid and choline.

There are twelve minerals that are critical to a dog’s health. These minerals are calcium, phosphorus, zinc, magnesium, Iodine, sodium, potassium, copper, chlorine, iron, manganese and selenium.

In addition, there are ten important amino acids dogs obtain from the food they eat that are necessary for correct body functioning. These amino acids are arginine, histidine, threonine, tryptophan, lysine, methionine, leucine, phenyalanine, valine and isoleucine. A dog needs these essential amino acids to build strong muscles and to control nerve impulses in its body.

A dog that does not receive sufficient vitamins, minerals and amino acids in its diet is susceptible to weakness, joint pain, gastrointestinal symptoms, increased heart rate, and enlargement of the thyroid gland.

There are other side effects of poor nutrition due to vitamin and mineral deficiencies. A deficiency in vitamin A can cause central nervous system depression and a deficiency of vitamin D can cause fatigue or exhaustion. A sodium deficiency can cause restlessness and a magnesium deficiency can cause irritability.

The best type of dog food your dog should eat is a high-quality, all-natural dog food containing adequate amounts of vitamins, minerals, and essential amino acids. A nutritious dog food should not contain by-products or synthetic additives. Buy the best food you can afford for your dog and you may enjoy many more years together.

How to Diagnose Diabetes in Dogs

Monday, March 14th, 2016


Diabetes can severely affect a dog if not detected in its early stages. It’s not always easy to diagnose diabetes in a dog but early detection can improve the quality of the dog’s life, prevent complications, and has been shown in some cases to cure the disease.

Diabetes is a disease caused by an increased amount of blood sugar that can’t be regulated by the insulin produced by a dog’s body. Diabetes can also result from the pancreas failing to produce enough insulin, thereby making it impossible for a dog’s body to assimilate all the glucose in the blood. The symptoms of the disease are the same for both types of diabetes.

The early signs of diabetes in a dog include changes in eating habits or more frequent urination. A high level of glucose in the blood can cause increased thirst in a dog and it will drink more water than usual. This intake of extra fluids results in more frequent urination. A dog may also have an increased appetite, but still lose a significant amount of weight.

The most challenging thing about canine diabetes is the fact that it may not have any symptoms at all. In some dogs, diabetes may slowly disrupt its bodily functions without showing any discernible signs of disease.

To help in diagnosing diabetes in your dog, watch carefully for any of the following symptoms that are evident for more than a week or two: Lethargy , excessive water consumption, increased urination, an unexplained weight gain or weight loss.

If you suspect that your dog has diabetes, you should have blood and urine tests done by your veterinarian to confirm or rule out diabetes. Diabetes is often discovered during a routine checkup when blood and urine tests are performed by a vet. If the test results show an increased level of glucose in the blood as well as in the urine, it’s a good indication that a dog may have diabetes.

Undetected diabetes can lead to frequent infections, eye cataracts, kidney failure, blindness, pancreatitis, nervous system damage, and possible early death.

If diabetes is diagnosed in a dog early enough, it may fully recover from the disease; but this usually depends on the age and health condition of a dog. For older dogs, a full recovery generally is not possible.

Full recovery from diabetes may be possible only in the following cases: A younger dog that loses weight and has a complete change of diet, or a dog with diabetes resulting from an abnormal pancreas function if it receives specific treatment for the diabetes.

Even if the condition is not always treatable, regular administration of insulin can often control diabetes in dogs.

Diabetes is regarded as a silent killer, and while a permanent cure for canine diabetes has not been discovered, a dog can often live a normal life with the proper care.

Why Dogs Vomit Blood

Monday, September 21st, 2015


When a dog vomits blood it is suffering from a condition known as hematemesis. Hematemesis could be a temporary condition or a sign of chronic gastrointestinal illness.

The most common reasons why dogs vomit blood are: (1) a small amount of bright red blood indicating an injury in the mouth or throat, (2) a significant amount of dark, clotted blood indicating a serious gastrointestinal condition.

Some symptoms that may accompany a dog’s vomiting of blood include: rapid weight loss, bloating, excessive thirst (this can also be a symptom of diabetes in a dog), or darkened stools.

There are some acute illnesses a vet will need to test for and exclude before the possibility of a chronic condition can be diagnosed. These include poisoning of the animal, swallowing of a foreign object, parasites in the gastrointestinal tract, or bad reactions to prescribed medications.

There are some serious chronic gastrointestinal illnesses and diseases than can also cause a dog to vomit blood, including kidney disease, tumors, bowel obstructions, or liver disease.

When a dog vomits blood, it should be considered just as serious as if it were a human vomiting blood. A responsible pet owner will call their vet for an emergency visit should their dog begin vomiting blood.

Don’t take a chance that it’s nothing serious or that the problem will go away on its own. Your pet deserves better treatment than that.

Why Do Dogs Lose Their Hair

Monday, April 13th, 2015


Dogs lose their hair in the spring and fall and this is simply a dog’s natural process of shedding. But if your dog starts losing too much hair, or loses a lot of hair throughout the year, you need to determine what’s causing the loss. Excessive hair loss can result in the dog having bald patches on parts of its body.

It’s possible that a vitamin deficiency is causing your dog to lose its hair. To prevent vitamin or mineral deficiency in your dog, start it on a daily regimen of Winston’s Senior Complete Multi, the most powerful and complete once a day multi vitamin for dogs 5 years and older. Don’t let the word “Senior” in the product name cause you to think it’s only good for older dogs. Many dogs are seniors at 5 and 6 years, but lots of dogs are still young at that age and they have many possible years of life left.

It helps to know that certain kinds of food can also affect your dog’s skin and coat and result in excessive shedding. A dog whose diet is lacking in good nutritional value can lose hair and have a coat that looks unhealthy. You may need to consult with your vet to find the best kind of food to keep your dog’s coat looking good and shedding less.

Another reason dogs lose their hair is because of skin allergies that cause itchiness and rashes, and when your dog licks and scratches the area it can result in hair loss and bald patches. Skin problems can also be caused by airborne allergens, some foods, chemicals, or parasites. These types of allergies can be treated with antihistamines, allergy shots, parasite medication and topical ointments containing steroids.

Fleas, mites and worms are some of the most common parasites that cause skin irritations and hair loss on dogs. Parasites leach the nutrients from your dog’s body and result in an unhealthy looking coat and hair loss. Some parasites like fleas cause extreme itchiness in a dog and the dog will scratch his skin excessively, causing wounds, possible bleeding, and hair loss.

To kill the parasites you’ll need to use a special formula shampoo available at most major pet stores to get rid of the skin parasites and soothe the dog’s itchiness.

If you notice a large amount of hair loss accompanied by any one of these signs – lethargy, weight loss, or sudden changes in behavior, you should take your dog to the vet as soon as possible. The underlying cause of these signs could be a serious problem, and the sooner you act, the healthier your dog will be.

Symptoms of Diabetes in Dogs

Monday, January 19th, 2015


Diabetes in dogs is a condition where the pancreas does not produce sufficient amounts of insulin to effectively process the foods a dog eats. Because the food isn’t processed appropriately, it is unable to pass into the cells where it can be utilized, causing an excess of sugars to be passed into the bloodstream.

Common symptoms of diabetes in dogs are extreme thirst, excessive urination, ravenous hunger and weight loss. As the disease progresses, almost every system in the dog’s body can be impacted. If you suspect your dog may have diabetes, it is important to see a veterinarian for testing, diagnosis and the beginning of treatment.

Even though your dog may be drinking large amounts of water, its body is using more water than normal in order to flush its systems in an attempt to bring the blood sugar to a normal level.

Weight loss is caused by the body’s inability to take in adequate nutrients. The body begins to consume itself producing ketoacidosis, a condition that can become deadly if not treated.

Your dog may also exhibit symptoms of lethargy which is caused by its elevated blood sugar. The body and muscles are not able to operate efficiently under these conditions so it is easier for the dog to just lie around your house.

Because the symptoms of diabetes in dogs could also be an indication of other diseases, your veterinarian will conduct a thorough examination to determine if any of your dog’s systems such as heart, eyes or kidneys have been damaged.

Additional tests may be run on the blood and urine samples once the diagnosis of diabetes has been confirmed. The urine may be tested for protein presence. This indicates whether the diabetes has begun to break down muscle tissue in order to provide nutrients for your dog’s body. Your veterinarian may also want to conduct a hemoglobin A1c test on the blood to help him determine how long your dog’s blood sugars have been elevated. The blood may also be tested to determine if your dog’s kidney function has been impacted and how much function is left.

Once a dog is diagnosed with diabetes, the vet will prescribe insulin injections. It may take a few weeks to determine the appropriate dosage, but then the dog should be able to live a relatively normal life except for the addition of daily injections and possibly testing of blood sugar. Diabetes can be a juggling act as diet, medication and exercise must all be part of the equation in caring for a diabetic dog.

A low protein dog food is often recommended for diabetic dogs in order to minimize the strain on the kidneys and to protect their kidney function. Regular exercise is also recommended for a diabetic dog in order to help maintain control of the diabetes.

Treating a diabetic dog involves a combination of medication, food and exercise. Finding an appropriate balance is key to controlling its diabetes and preventing further complications.

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