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Joint Issues

  • Hip Dysplasia
  • Arthritis
  • Osteochondritis (OCD)
  • Stiffness/Inflammation
  • Ligament Tears
  • Growing Pains
  • Mobility Problems
  • Joint Pain
  • Back/Spinal Problems
  • Hypertrophic Osteodystrophy (HOD)

Symptoms

Is your pet becoming less active, less playful, or desiring shorter walks? The following symptoms could be early signs of OCD, Arthritis or Hip Dysplasia.

  • Moving more slowly
  • Difficulty getting up
  • Weight shift to another leg
  • Personality change
  • Reluctant to walk, jump or play
  • Refuses using stairs or the car
  • Change in appetite
  • Change in behavior
  • Muscle atrophy
  • Lagging behind
  • Yelping when touched
  • Limping
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Posts Tagged ‘Vitamins for Dogs’

Can Dogs Eat Frozen Food?

Monday, December 7th, 2015


Frozen dog foods are becoming popular in the pet food world. The major concern for most dog owners is the question, “Can dogs eat frozen food?”

Some dog owners are choosing to purchase commercially prepared raw foods for their pets with choices ranging from turkey, chicken, beef and lamb, to exotic meats like quail, rabbit and antelope.

These fully prepared meals can be made up of only ground meat, or meat with ground up bone and vegetables. The meals that contain only meat use muscle meat as well as organ meats like liver, heart and other organs that wild dogs consume.

If you want to feed your dog a vegetarian diet, there are frozen vegetable mixtures also available on the market.

Dogs are carnivores and they require a diet of raw meat and natural foods that have been prepared with minimal processing. For centuries a dog’s diet was mostly grain-free and contained a multitude of enzymes and antioxidants that dogs today do not get in heat-processed dog food.

To provide the natural proteins, antioxidants, enzymes, vitamins, and minerals a dog needs, raw meat that is free of hormones and antibiotics supplies a dog with the sources for these ingredients.

Many owners find that feeding pre-prepared frozen foods for their dog is a relatively easy way to assure that their pet is receiving the vitamins and minerals necessary to good health.

We recommend you visit one of the following online sites that offer these meals: www.naturesvariety.com, www.stevesrealfood.com, or www.darwinspet.com.

You may also want to consider supplementing one of these prepared raw food diets with raw bones. Meat doesn’t contain a sufficient amount of calcium for a dog’s body, so dogs in the wild receive the bulk of their calcium by consuming bones which provide the additional nutrients a dog needs.

Raw bones should not be cooked. When cooked they become brittle and can break into pieces in your dog’s digestive system. If your dog has a tendency to eat too fast, you can feed it frozen bones that have been slightly thawed. This will force your dog to spend more time eating the bone.

In addition to raw food and bones, many companies sell frozen treats for dogs that look like ice cream tidbits and popsicles that we humans eat. The treats are made from dog-friendly foods like peanut butter, bananas and berries and most dogs find them to be delicious and special snacks.

Dogs can eat frozen foods and will usually like them.

If you’re interested in feeding your dog raw foods you can visit one of the raw pet food sites listed above, or start out by buying fresh raw meat at your grocers and begin feeding your dog small amounts of meat to see if it can easily digest it.

Why Do Dogs Lose Their Hair

Monday, April 13th, 2015


Dogs lose their hair in the spring and fall and this is simply a dog’s natural process of shedding. But if your dog starts losing too much hair, or loses a lot of hair throughout the year, you need to determine what’s causing the loss. Excessive hair loss can result in the dog having bald patches on parts of its body.

It’s possible that a vitamin deficiency is causing your dog to lose its hair. To prevent vitamin or mineral deficiency in your dog, start it on a daily regimen of Winston’s Senior Complete Multi, the most powerful and complete once a day multi vitamin for dogs 5 years and older. Don’t let the word “Senior” in the product name cause you to think it’s only good for older dogs. Many dogs are seniors at 5 and 6 years, but lots of dogs are still young at that age and they have many possible years of life left.

It helps to know that certain kinds of food can also affect your dog’s skin and coat and result in excessive shedding. A dog whose diet is lacking in good nutritional value can lose hair and have a coat that looks unhealthy. You may need to consult with your vet to find the best kind of food to keep your dog’s coat looking good and shedding less.

Another reason dogs lose their hair is because of skin allergies that cause itchiness and rashes, and when your dog licks and scratches the area it can result in hair loss and bald patches. Skin problems can also be caused by airborne allergens, some foods, chemicals, or parasites. These types of allergies can be treated with antihistamines, allergy shots, parasite medication and topical ointments containing steroids.

Fleas, mites and worms are some of the most common parasites that cause skin irritations and hair loss on dogs. Parasites leach the nutrients from your dog’s body and result in an unhealthy looking coat and hair loss. Some parasites like fleas cause extreme itchiness in a dog and the dog will scratch his skin excessively, causing wounds, possible bleeding, and hair loss.

To kill the parasites you’ll need to use a special formula shampoo available at most major pet stores to get rid of the skin parasites and soothe the dog’s itchiness.

If you notice a large amount of hair loss accompanied by any one of these signs – lethargy, weight loss, or sudden changes in behavior, you should take your dog to the vet as soon as possible. The underlying cause of these signs could be a serious problem, and the sooner you act, the healthier your dog will be.

Should I Feed My Dog Wet or Dry Food?

Monday, June 30th, 2014

Should I feed my dog wet or dry food is a common question that customers often ask us. But there is no one right answer because both wet and dry dog food have their own unique qualities that are beneficial to dogs. A dry dog food does help remove plaque and tartar from a dog’s teeth. It is also less expensive than canned food. Canned dog food however, contains less fillers and preservatives than dry dog foods.

Most canned dog foods also contain a higher grade of nutrients and are higher in protein than dry food. Wet foods taste great to dogs, which means they will eat every speck of food you put in their feeding dish.

The main benefit to feeding your dog a dry food diet is that it is beneficial for its dental health. Eating dry food kibble helps strengthen a dog’s jaw muscles in addition to removing some, but not all, of the plaque and tartar from a pet’s teeth. Wet food does not provide the abrasive action that helps clean the teeth.

But what if you have a new puppy? Should you be feeding it wet food or dry food? One of the most important responsibilities of raising a puppy is to provide the best quality dog food that will supply all the nutrients needed for the puppy’s growth and maintenance. Growing puppies need more protein than adult dogs to support their growing muscles and organs.

A visit to a supermarket or pet store to buy dog food can become a troubling ordeal if you’re not sure which brand to buy. There is such a wide array of commercial dog foods available, most of which are supported with heavy advertising to convince a dog owner that one particular brand is far better than any of the other competing brands. Then when you finally decide on the brand, you’re confronted with the choice of dry or canned.

So, we’re back to the question, “Which is better, dry dog food or canned?”

It really depends on your dog, your preferences, and probably your budget. Dry dog food costs less per serving than canned foods and its nutrients are more concentrated, meaning you’ll be feeding your dog a smaller quantity of food to satisfy its hunger and provide all the protein, vitamins and minerals it needs.

Although price may be one of your main considerations, the nutritional content and the ingredients are equally important factors. The top rated dog foods use grain-free formulas that contain only high-quality ingredients with no added artificial ingredients. Carefully read the labels of all the dog foods you’re considering. Fillers, by-products and common allergenic ingredients like corn, wheat, or soy are never present in a high quality dog food. Dogs have a difficult time digesting corn, and “meat-by products” are always inferior sources of protein. The bottom line is you need to choose the best food for your dog, not by price or the most advertised brand, but by what your dog needs to stay healthy and happy.

It’s not easy to give you a definitive answer on whether to feed your dog dry food or wet food, primarily because so many of the studies published on dog food are sponsored in part by manufacturers of either wet food or dry food. Unfortunately, veterinarians and animal experts have also come to a general agreement that there is no agreement.

As for me, I believe that the best thing I can do for my faithful companion is to consider his diet just as important as mine and strive to keep both of us healthy.

Should You Supplement Your Older Dog’s Diet?

Monday, February 11th, 2013

Many dog owners wonder if they should add a supplement to an older dog’s diet. As your dog ages, it becomes even more important to feed it a healthy dog food and add a beneficial supplement.

Older dogs, unlike puppies or young adult dogs, cannot absorb some vitamins, minerals, and electrolytes through their intestinal tract, and will expel more of them through their kidneys and urine. Some older dogs also eat less food and may not be getting their daily requirements of vitamins and minerals. Antioxidants such as vitamins A, E, and C (beta-carotene) may be instrumental in protecting against some of the normal aging processes that affect older dogs.

One of the very best supplements for an older dog is Winston’s Senior Complete Multi vitamin and mineral supplement. Winston’s Senior Multi-Vitamin contains close to 50 active ingredients that provide additional nourishment for an older dog. Even if you don’t believe your dog is suffering from nutrient depletion due to a poor diet, stress, or disease, giving it a supplement along with its normal diet, will guarantee your pet is receiving all the vitamins and minerals it needs for a healthy, active life.

When choosing a supplement for senior dogs, carefully check the label to be sure it includes the following ingredients:
* At least 8 essential vitamins including Vitamin A, B-complex, D, and E, as well as the B vitamins. Vitamins A and E are important antioxidants that help maintain a healthy immune system.

* All or most of these important minerals – Phosphorous, Potassium, Sodium, Chloride, Magnesium, Copper, Manganese, Iodine and Selenium.

Not all vitamin supplements contain these quality ingredients. Winston’s Senior Complete Multi does, and also contains lutein for the eyes, CoQ10 for the heart, digestive enzymes, lycopene for the cells, antioxidant Perna for the joints, vitamin K, zinc, calcium, Grape Seed Extract, Alpha Lipoic Acid, amino acids, vitamin C and more.

It doesn’t matter what species your dog is or its age, a healthy supplementation like Winston’s Senior Complete Multi will help it live the best quality life possible.

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