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The #1 source for immediate, long-term relief for dogs suffering from degenerative diseases like hip dysplasia, OCD and arthritis.

We are specialists in the treatment of canine joint disease and its accompanying pain.

Let us help put an end to your dog’s suffering, joint stiffness, pain, immobility, and poor quality of life. Our proven products will help you easily accomplish this without the use of drugs or invasive surgery.

Joint Issues

  • Hip Dysplasia
  • Arthritis
  • Osteochondritis (OCD)
  • Stiffness/Inflammation
  • Ligament Tears
  • Growing Pains
  • Mobility Problems
  • Joint Pain
  • Back/Spinal Problems
  • Hypertrophic Osteodystrophy (HOD)

Symptoms

Is your pet becoming less active, less playful, or desiring shorter walks? The following symptoms could be early signs of OCD, Arthritis or Hip Dysplasia.

  • Moving more slowly
  • Difficulty getting up
  • Weight shift to another leg
  • Personality change
  • Reluctant to walk, jump or play
  • Refuses using stairs or the car
  • Change in appetite
  • Change in behavior
  • Muscle atrophy
  • Lagging behind
  • Yelping when touched
  • Limping
We Can Help!
 

Posts Tagged ‘Veterinary Pet Care’

Dogs With OCD

Monday, July 11th, 2016

Dogs with OCD (or Osteochondrosis) suffer a great deal of pain and mobility issues.

When a dog has OCD, fragments of bone and cartilage become detached from larger bones and end up floating around the area encompassing a dog’s joints. The result is that any movement in the joint where those fragments are located will cause a dog to suffer from severe pain.

Dogs With OCD (or osteochondrosis)

What is Osteochondrosis (OCD)

OCD is a congenital problem that usually affects only larger dogs who seem to be predisposed to the condition.

The best way to understand the true cause of this condition is that it is a disease of the cartilage that results in large pieces of cartilage and bone becoming detached and floating freely. This causes a dog with OCD a lot of pain.

These free floating bone and cartilage pieces can lead to the development of arthritis, hip dysplasia, secondary degenerative joint disease, or other side effects.

There are several variations of osteochondrosis (OCD), and all typically affect the dog’s joints at the ankle, shoulder, elbow and knee on one or both sides of a dog’s body.

The different types of OCD are distinguished by their location on a dog’s body. They are also differentiated from each other based on the severity and the primary cause of the condition.

It’s more common for OCD to affect the forelimbs than a dog’s hind feet and legs.

Symptoms of OCD in dogs

To properly treat and identify OCD in your pet, you need to be able to recognize the symptoms of this disease. OCD can develop at any stage of a dog’s life, although it is more common in younger dogs than in older ones.

Dogs with OCD will show some of the following warning signs:

  • Pain when the affected limb is touched;
  • Muscle degeneration on the affected side of the dog’s body;
  • A general limitation of movement;
  • Lameness or difficulty moving around.

How to diagnose and treat OCD in dogs

A veterinarian will diagnose osteochondrosis using a series of X-ray tests.

Treatment of the disease requires lifestyle changes. The dog’s exercise routine must be changed to ensure that the dog can remain active and suffer fewer mobility problems.

Dogs suffering with joint diseases like OCD, arthritis, bursitis, hip dysplasia and other degenerative problems with the shoulders, elbows and hocks can find immediate and long-term relief without drugs with a regular regimen of Winston’s Joint System, a combination of three, totally-natural whole food supplements developed by a Naturopathic Doctor for his own dog. Winston’s contains no drugs and there are no side-effects.

Winston’s Pain Formula is another product proven to be fast acting and highly effective in relieving the pain in a dog caused by these diseases. Both of these products help your dog to recover much faster.

Dogs with OCD will require a change in diet and careful observation to prevent overfeeding and weight gain which contribute to damage of the joints due to OCD. Work with your vet to determine if your dog’s diet is properly supporting its joint health or if it can be changed to be more effective.

Since 1990, Winston’s Joint System and Winston’s Pain Formula have helped heal over twenty thousand dogs from all over the world. Our staff specializes in hip dysplasia, arthritis and all joint, pain and mobility issues.
 
There is an excellent chance we can help your dog, so please contact us at: www.dogshealth.com or call our toll free number at 888-901-5557.

How To Give Your Dog a Pill

Monday, May 2nd, 2016


If you’ve recently taken your dog to the vet and were given medication to treat an illness or ailment, chances are good that the medication came in the form of a pill. But suppose your dog hates being given a pill because of the taste or for other reasons. If you have an intransigent and uncooperative dog, here are some clues on how to give your dog a pill.

Probably the easiest way to give your dog a pill is to hide it in a piece of its food. If that doesn’t work (and many a dog is smart enough to eat the food and spit out the pill) try putting the pill in a small amount of peanut butter or cream cheese. This usually provides a good incentive for your dog to take the medication without being aware of it. If you decide to put the pill in the dog’s food, feed a small amount of the food separately before inserting the pill.

One mistake some people make is to crush the pill and mix it into the dog’s regular food. The problem with this approach is if the dog doesn’t eat the whole meal, it won’t be getting the benefit of the correct dosage of medication it needs.

If your dog refuses to take the pill in its food or the medication cannot be administered with food, you’ll need to try a different tack to get your pet to take its medicine.

One way is to hold the pill between your thumb and index finger. Holding your dog’s muzzle with the other hand, gently grasp the dog’s muzzle from above, placing your thumb on one side and your fingers on the other side.

Squeeze behind the dog’s upper canine teeth and tilt its head back over the shoulders so it’s looking at the ceiling. This will cause the lower jaw to automatically drop a bit.

Place a finger between the lower canine teeth (the long front teeth) and push down to lower the dog’s bottom jaw.

Quickly put the pill as far back in your dog’s mouth as possible, getting it over the ‘hump’ of the tongue. Be careful not to put your hand in too far or your dog may gag.

Close your dog’s mouth. While holding the mouth closed, lower the head to a normal position to make it easier for your dog to swallow the pill. If your dog will not swallow the pill after this action try rubbing or blowing on your dog’s nose to help stimulate it to swallow the pill.

When your dog finally swallows the pill, praise it and offer a treat. This will make it easier the next time you need to administer a pill.

If this seems too difficult or confusing to you, ask one of the veterinarian staff to demonstrate this method for you. Then when you’re at home and need to give your dog a pill you’ll know exactly what to do.

Orthopedic Dog Beds

Monday, April 18th, 2016

An orthopedic dog bed provides more support for a dog’s joints and muscles when it’s suffering from hip dysplasia or arthritis.

An orthopedic bed with special cushioning can help your dog feel more comfortable and provide the extra cushioning to allow it to get a good night’s sleep.

Orthopedic Dog Beds

An orthopedic dog bed helps absorb the dog’s weight and distributes it evenly over its body. It will also help soothe the muscles of an active dog that frequently jogs with its owner or expends a lot of energy running around on its own.

Some additional advantages of sleeping on an orthopedic bed are that the bed helps cushion a dog’s joints and bones; is ideal for older dogs prone to aches and pains; helps dogs with arthritis; young dogs with hip dysplasia have less strain placed on their joints as they grow; the beds prevent a dog’s body from creating compression points that intensify orthopedic conditions; and the beds relieve pressure that can cause your dog pain, discomfort and muscle aches.

One of the best orthopedic dog beds you can buy is the Canine Cooler dog bed. It’s non-electric, non-toxic, paw-puncture proof, and easy to clean. Fleas hate the cool environment but dogs love it.

The Canine Cooler dog bed uses SoothSoft Comfort Technology to give your dog comfort that is second to none. The fluid-enhanced design offers a dry, lasting cooling effect, combined with a superior cushioning support. No refrigeration is necessary; SoothSoft Comfort Technology works at room temperature.

The Canine Cooler bed is puncture proof and completely maintenance free. Other pet beds allow fleas to burrow and lay eggs, but the smooth surface of the Canine Cooler bed is easily wiped clean. It’s outer membrane is 20 mil thick – tough enough to park a truck on and not pop! The bed is guaranteed against claw puncture for two years. And as tough as this membrane is, you can rest assured that it will not harm your dog should the bed be chewed by accident.

The Canine Cooler Bed is one of the leading orthopedic dog beds available today. It activates with water; no electricity is needed; the cold therapy soothes inflammation and painful joints; it is non-toxic and safe for the environment; and is useful for a variety of therapeutic applications.

Since 1990, Winston’s Joint System and Winston’s Pain Formula have helped heal over twenty thousand dogs from all over the world. Our staff specializes in hip dysplasia, arthritis and all joint, pain and mobility issues.
 
There is an excellent chance we can help your dog, so please contact us at: www.dogshealth.com or call our toll free number at 888-901-5557.

Low Carb Dog Food

Monday, March 21st, 2016


If your dog is substantially overweight or obese like one fourth of all dogs in the United States, you should begin feeding your pet a low carb dog food which can be beneficial to any overweight or obese pet.

Dogs are able to maintain an appropriate weight consuming almost any dog food on the market as long as they don’t over-indulge at mealtimes, are not fed too many treats and snacks at other times, and are getting enough exercise. But even for dogs who are not overweight or obese, a low-carb diet can help avoid health problems later in life.

Obese dogs are at risk for diabetes, heart disease, arthritis, hip dysplasia, and metabolic disorders. A low-carb diet is a necessity for dogs that are overweight and for dogs diagnosed with diabetes.

Dogs are omnivores which means they eat meat and vegetables, including fruits and grains. But considering the evolution of dogs who originated from the wolf, it makes sense that over-feeding your dog with grains like wheat and corn is not a good idea.

Dog’s bodies were designed for diets that are low in sugar and refined starches, and the high doses of carbohydrates a dog consumes when eating manufactured dog foods are not healthy. It may shock you to know that most commercial dog foods contain between 30% to 70% carbohydrates.

In addition to the high doses of carbs, many dog foods contain filler ingredients such as corn meal and starches. These ingredients, along with animal by-products which are the leftovers from other food processing, are unfit for human consumption. The reason they are added to dog food is to provide cheaper ingredients for the manufacturer and make a dog feel full faster without providing the nutrients a dog needs; something akin to fast food for humans.

Dog food ingredients you should try to avoid include wheat, corn, cornmeal, yellow corn and whole grain corn, brewer’s rice, cereals, and potatoes. All of these are filler ingredients that are very high in carbs.

There are many good brands of low-carb dog foods. Some come in the form of raw and dehydrated foods which are beneficial to a dog’s health because they are higher in nutrients. Several brands use entirely grain-free recipes as well as hormone-free turkey and meat.

Check for pet foods that are lower in carbs by examining the ingredients. Look for a low carbohydrate and high protein content in the food. Some of the ingredients to look for are beef, chicken, lamb, turkey or pork. Never give your dog any food containing “animal meal” or “animal fat.” This is a red flag for very poor-quality dog food.

Dog foods containing vegetables and fruits are also good for your dog and provide many of the nutrients missing in meat. Many low carb dog foods may also contain apples, bananas, cranberries, spinach, carrots, and celery.

Low carb dog foods with these ingredients are healthy for dogs in all stages of life, from puppies to senior dogs. Just remember to avoid all dog foods containing grains and buy those with real meat, fruits and vegetables.

Raising Dogs and Cats in the Same House

Monday, March 7th, 2016


Dogs and cats are not sworn enemies. They often live together in the same house without problems. If you are raising both dogs and cats in the same house, there are some rules that should be followed so the animals can coexist in peace.

If you adopt a cat and dog at the same time when they are young, they can easily adapt to living together and even become good friends, or at the very worst, learn to tolerate each other.

Each pet will need its own space in order to feel comfortable and safe. You’ll also need to be sure each pet is fed enough food or one of them will attempt to steal the other’s food.

If you have a dog or a cat that’s used to being the only animal in the house, adopting a new pet is not always an agreeable event for the pet who has established your house as their sole domain You’ll need to make sure you introduce the new pet gradually so there won’t be fights and the pets will be able to adjust to one another.

When you bring a new pet into your house, you should keep it isolated from the other for a short period of time, allowing it to interact with your existing pet for just a few minutes each day until you are convinced that there will be no problems between them; or if there is, the problems will be minor.

As the pets become better acquainted you can increase the length of time they spend together. This will allow both pets to feel more comfortable. The old pet won’t feel threatened by the new one and the new pet won’t tend to be aggressive toward the other in an attempt to establish its territory.

Dogs are usually more likely to accept a new cat. However, some cats may never accept a new dog and will always be hostile towards it.

If you are going to raise both dogs and cats in the same house and don’t want to make the old pet jealous of the new one, don’t show more affection towards the new pet, even if the new pet is a puppy or a kitten. The old pet may feel neglected and may develop an attitude towards the new pet.

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