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The #1 source for immediate, long-term relief for dogs suffering from degenerative diseases like hip dysplasia, OCD and arthritis.

We are specialists in the treatment of canine joint disease and its accompanying pain.

Let us help put an end to your dog’s suffering, joint stiffness, pain, immobility, and poor quality of life. Our proven products will help you easily accomplish this without the use of drugs or invasive surgery.

Joint Issues

  • Hip Dysplasia
  • Arthritis
  • Osteochondritis (OCD)
  • Stiffness/Inflammation
  • Ligament Tears
  • Growing Pains
  • Mobility Problems
  • Joint Pain
  • Back/Spinal Problems
  • Hypertrophic Osteodystrophy (HOD)

Symptoms

Is your pet becoming less active, less playful, or desiring shorter walks? The following symptoms could be early signs of OCD, Arthritis or Hip Dysplasia.

  • Moving more slowly
  • Difficulty getting up
  • Weight shift to another leg
  • Personality change
  • Reluctant to walk, jump or play
  • Refuses using stairs or the car
  • Change in appetite
  • Change in behavior
  • Muscle atrophy
  • Lagging behind
  • Yelping when touched
  • Limping
We Can Help!
 

Posts Tagged ‘Purebreds’

Hip Dysplasia in Shih Tzus

Monday, November 30th, 2015

Hip Dysplasia in Shih Tzus is not as common as it is in larger breed dogs. However, the sad fact is that all sizes of dogs and many breeds are susceptible to this debilitating disease.

Hip Dysplasia in a Shih Tzu

Shih Tzus

Shih Tzus are lively and energetic little companions, but are low-keyed and easily satisfied.

They like nothing better than to be held, petted, and pampered by their owners, and are perfectly happy sitting on the couch with their owner for hours.

Their personality ranges from arrogance and haughtiness at times, to courageousness and politeness at other times.

A Shih Tzu makes a good family dog and adapts well to both children and adults, but they’re not particularly good with very young children as they can’t be handled roughly or awkwardly and they tend to get snappy when their patience wears thin.

They adapt well to apartment living, and while they don’t require as much exercise as large active dogs, daily walks are necessary.

They do make alert and reliable watchdogs, barking vigorously when anyone comes close to their house.

Shih Tzus require more care than other breeds if their hair is kept long. They need daily brushing and regular haircuts but they shed very little, making them a perfect pet choice for anyone who suffers from allergies.

The Shih Tzu is one of the world’s oldest dog breeds. Chinese paintings from the 6th century A.D. show Shi Tzu-like dogs, and historical records note that they were kept as house pets during the Ming Dynasty.

Shih Tzus have long flowing hair, including a tuft of hair above the nose that gives them their characteristic “chrysanthemum” face.

Their rounded heads have a long beard and moustache, a short muzzle and a black nose. Most Shih Tzus have round, dark, wide-set eyes with hanging ears covered with hair. They are longer than they are tall, and their tail curls over the back.

A healthy Shih Tzu can live as long as 15 years. Common health issues include ear and kidney infections, eye problems, and hip dysplasia.

Hip Dysplasia in Shih Tzus

Hip dysplasia is a genetic disease that primarily affects large and giant breeds of dogs but can also affect medium-sized breeds and occasionally small breeds. It is primarily a disease of purebreds, although it can also occur in mixed breeds.

To understand hip dysplasia in Shih Tzus and the resulting arthritis, you need a basic understanding of how the dog’s hip joint is affected.

The hip joint is comprised of a ball and socket that forms the attachment of the hind leg to the body. The ball portion is the head of the femur and the socket is located on the pelvis.

In a normal hip joint the ball rotates freely within the socket. The bones are shaped to perfectly match each other with the socket surrounding the ball. To strengthen the joint, the two bones are held together by a strong ligament.

The joint capsule, a strong band of connective tissue, circles the two bones to provide added stability.

What a normal hip joint looks like:

normal hip joint

Hip dysplasia is linked to abnormal joint structure and a laxity of the muscles, connective tissue, and ligaments that would normally support the dog’s hip joints.

As the disease progresses, the articular surfaces of the two bones lose contact with each other. This separation of the two bones within the joint causes a drastic change in the size and shape of the articular surfaces.

What an abnormal hip joint looks like:

hip dysplasia joint

Most Shih Tzus who eventually develop hip dysplasia are born with normal hips, but due to their genetic make-up the soft tissues surrounding the joint develop abnormally. This leads to the symptoms associated with hip dysplasia. The disease may affect both hips, or only the right or left hip.

Hip dysplasia in Shih Tzus will cause afflicted dogs to walk or run with an altered gait, similar to a bunny-hop. The dog begins to resist any movement that requires full extension or flexion of the rear legs. It will experience stiffness and pain in the rear legs after exercising and on first rising in the morning. Climbing stairs becomes difficult if not impossible. Some dogs will limp and are less willing to participate in normal daily activities, including walks they formerly enjoyed.

It appears that the amount of calories a dog consumes, especially during its fast-growth period from three to ten months, has the biggest impact on whether or not a dog genetically prone to hip dysplasia will develop the disease.

Obesity can increase the severity of the disease in dogs that are genetically susceptible and the extra weight will intensify the degeneration of a dog’s joints and hips. Dogs who are genetically prone to hip dysplasia and also are overweight, are at a much higher risk of developing hip dysplasia and eventually arthritis.

Exercise can be another risk factor. Dogs genetically susceptible to hip dysplasia may have an increased incidence of the disease if they are over-exercised at a young age. Moderate exercise like running and swimming is best for exercising young dogs.

Treatment

Because hip dysplasia in Shih Tzus is primarily an inherited condition, there are no products that can prevent its development.

Through proper diet, exercise, and a daily regimen of Winston’s Joint System, you can slow, and sometimes halt, the progression of this degenerative joint disease while providing your dog with relief from its pain. Winston’s provides many of the raw materials essential for the synthesis of the joint-lubricating synovial fluid as well as the repair of articular cartilage and connective tissue.

You might also want to consider providing your dog with an orthopedic bed like the Canine Cooler Bed which distributes the dog’s weight evenly and reduces pressure on its joints. The Canine Cooler Bed uses revolutionary SoothSoft Technology to give your dog the very best in comfort, and the fluid-enhanced design offers a dry, cooling effect with superior cushioning and support. It’s perfect for dogs with hip dysplasia or arthritis.

If owners insisted on only purchasing an animal whose parents and grandparents were certified to have good or excellent hips, and if breeders only bred these first-rate animals, then the majority of the problems caused by hip dysplasia would be eliminated.

If you are looking to purchase a Shih Tzu now or in the future, the best way to lessen the possibility of getting a dog that will develop hip dysplasia is to examine the incidence of the disease in the dog’s lineage. If at all possible, try to examine the parents and grandparents as far back as three or four generations.

There are different assumptions on how to prevent the progression of hip dysplasia in Shih Tzus.

Poor nutrition, inadequate or improper exercise, and increased body weight may all contribute to the severity of osteoarthritis after the hip dysplasia has developed. Watching the calories your puppy or young dog consumes and preventing obesity in your dog, allowing only non-stressful types of exercise, and a daily regimen of Winston’s Joint System, are the best things you can do for your dog.

Since 1990, Winston’s Joint System and Winston’s Pain Formula have helped heal over twenty thousand dogs from all over the world. Our staff specializes in hip dysplasia, arthritis and all joint, pain and mobility issues.
 
There is an excellent chance we can help your dog, so please contact us at: www.dogshealth.com or call our toll free number at 888-901-5557.

Dog Myths and Facts

Monday, May 13th, 2013

Dog care advice comes from many different sources, and therein lies the reason dog owners can be confused when it comes to dog myths and facts.


Here are some of the most common myths about dogs:

(1) Dogs Eat Grass When They Feel Sick
One of the oldest dog myths is that dogs eat grass when they feel sick to their stomachs, because it makes them vomit so they feel better. Eating grass can make your dog vomit but not because the grass itself sickens them but because the rough blades of grass often irritate a dog’s stomach lining. Most veterinarians, when asked about this myth, will tell you they believe that dogs eat grass simply because they like it.

(2) Mixed Breeds Are More Healthy Overall Than Purebreds
It is true that some breeds of dog are prone to specific diseases but it’s not true that mixed breed dogs are any healthier and heartier than purebred dogs. Mixed breed dogs are at risk of acquiring every inherited illness common in their genetic background. Owners of mixed breeds usually don’t know exactly what the genetic makeup is for their mixed breed, other than guessing their dog is part this breed and part that breed, when in fact, the dog might be a genetic mix of several breeds. This can put a mixed breed dog at a greater risk of developing genetic illnesses. The only way to be sure a dog won’t develop an inherited genetic illness is to adopt your pet from a reputable breeder who has screened the parents – and sometimes the grandparents – of a dog for any hereditary illnesses before they are bred.

(3) Dogs Eat Their Feces Because They Lack Certain Nutrients
Many dogs like to eat feces. There may be a medical reason for this but it’s usually just normal dog behavior. A dog might eat feces because it learned this behavior when it was young; it likes the taste (yes, I know you’re saying ‘ugh’ right now); it is seeking attention it’s not getting from you; or it gets very hungry between meals. You needn’t freak out if your dog occasionally eats its feces. Just be sure to clean up after your dog before it has a chance to eat it.

(4) Dogs Heal Themselves by Licking Their Wounds
It is true that dogs keep their wounds clean by licking them and this can speed up the healing process. But excessive licking of a wound is not good. It can easily promote more damage to the dog’s wounded tissues, which in turn may result in bacterial infection. If your dog starts licking a wound excessively, try to stop the behavior by focusing the dog’s attention on something else.

(5) A Dog’s Nose Should Be Cold and Wet
Most of the time, your dog’s nose will be cold and wet. On occasion it may suddenly become warm and dry. A dog’s nose will stay cold and wet because they tend to lick them a lot. A cold, wet nose is not an indicator of good health. You do need to watch for a runny nose or any discharge from the dog’s nasal passages which can indicate illness. Other than that, don’t worry about whether your dog’s nose is cold and wet or warmer and drier.

Before you boldly accept that something you heard or read about dogs is true, research it to see if it is really a dog myth or a dog fact!

Before You Adopt a Dog

Monday, January 21st, 2013

Are you thinking about adopting a dog from a shelter or buying a purebred from a breeder?

Before you adopt a dog think about the reasons you want to adopt. Is it for companionship, protection, or maybe unconditional love? These are actually excellent reasons for adopting a dog. Research indicates that dogs are good for our health and people who own dogs have lower blood pressure and lower levels of stress hormones in their blood.

Owning a dog is a huge responsibility, so if you’re contemplating adding an adult dog or a puppy to your household, there are several things you should consider before making such a major commitment.

You should never adopt a dog on an impulse or a whim. Realize that you are adding a living thing to your life, or to your family, and this animal will need to rely on you for its every need. The average lifespan for a dog is 12 years, so during the dog’s entire lifetime, you will be responsible for its every physical and emotional need.

Do you have the time required to care for a dog? Do you have young children or elderly parents living with you? If so, you need to take them into consideration also when deciding whether or not to get a dog? Do you have other time consuming commitments like work and social activities? If you do, it might be better to wait until you have more free time in your life to devote to taking care of a dog before you take on the extra responsibility.

You need to decide what kind of daily commitment you’re willing to make if you choose to adopt a dog. This will help you decide whether now is the right time to bring a dog or puppy into your life. Do a little research on the breed or breeds of dogs you’re considering. You’ll be able to make a better decision on what type of dog is best for you and your situation.

Plan on a minimum of one hour a day to provide basic care for a dog. The hour is broken up into periods for feeding, walking, exercising, and potty times. Remember, this is an hour every day, including weekends. Some breeds of dogs are very active and require a lot more time. Dogs with higher energy levels need longer and more frequent exercise periods to stay healthy and happy. A dog who has too much energy and not enough exercise or activities will find things to do that are not what you want your dog to do.

Training a new dog is important for you and your pet. Unfortunately, one of the most common reasons for a dog to be surrendered to a shelter and euthanized is a “behavior problem”. This is sad, as most behavioral problems can be prevented by proper training. If you adopt a puppy you will need to train it for at least 1/2 hour every day until youu’re satisfied it will obey your every command.

Please consider before you adopt a dog that a dog cannot raise itself. You will have to teach a dog how to behave. Training will teach your dog who is the leader and will make living with a pet much easier.

Dogs are social creatures and are usually devoted to their owner. Be sure you are giving the pet you choose a home forever, no matter what happens in your life.

Hip Dysplasia in Pointers

Monday, December 24th, 2012

Hip dysplasia is a genetic disease that primarily affects large, purebred breeds of dogs such as Pointers.

Hip Dysplasia in Pointers

Pointers

Pointers make excellent hunting dogs, but around the house they are well-behaved, protective, alert and extremely loyal animals.

A well-trained Pointer will have the best attributes of both a sporting dog and a household companion. They are very intelligent and easily trainable.

If you have small children in your family, the Pointer is a good choice for a pet because they are gentle dogs who love playing with children.

The Pointer has a lot of natural energy and needs plenty of room to run around; but also needs daily walks. If you’re a jogger or runner, your Pointer will love the exercise and probably still be going strong when you’re tired out.

The Pointer first appeared as a separate breed in the mid-17th century after breeders crossed Foxhounds, Greyhounds, Setters and Bloodhounds. The resulting mix was the first true “pointer” – a hunting dog that would stop immediately when it spotted game and point its muzzle in the direction of the game.

Pointers have lean, muscular, athletic frames covered in sleek, shiny coats that come in several colors: liver, black, yellow, or orange. Their coats are either solid colored or have white patches.

Their heads have long muzzles and jaw-length ears. They have round, watchful eyes in varying shades of brown. Their long necks slope down to narrow shoulders, strong backs and thick tails.

Pointers can live as long as 14 years. Common health issues include skin allergies, epilepsy, and hip dysplasia.

Hip Dysplasia in Pointers

Hip dysplasia is a genetic disease that primarily affects large and giant breeds of dogs but can also affect medium-sized breeds and occasionally small breeds. It is primarily a disease of purebreds, although it can also occur in mixed breeds.

To understand hip dysplasia in Pointers and the resulting arthritis, you need a basic understanding of how the dog’s hip joint is affected.

The hip joint is comprised of a ball and socket that forms the attachment of the hind leg to the body. The ball portion is the head of the femur and the socket is located on the pelvis.

In a normal hip joint the ball rotates freely within the socket. The bones are shaped to perfectly match each other with the socket surrounding the ball. To strengthen the joint, the two bones are held together by a strong ligament.

The joint capsule, a strong band of connective tissue, circles the two bones to provide added stability.

X-ray of a normal hip joint:

normal hip joint

Hip dysplasia is linked to abnormal joint structure and a laxity of the muscles, connective tissue, and ligaments that would normally support the dog’s hip joints.

As the disease progresses, the articular surfaces of the two bones lose contact with each other. This separation of the two bones within the joint causes a drastic change in the size and shape of the articular surfaces.

X-ray of an abnormal hip joint:

hip dysplasia joint

Most Pointers who eventually develop hip dysplasia are born with normal hips, but due to their genetic make-up the soft tissues surrounding the joint develop abnormally. This leads to the symptoms associated with hip dysplasia. The disease may affect both hips, or only the right or left hip.

The symptoms of hip dysplasia in Pointers cause afflicted dogs to walk or run with an altered gait, similar to a bunny-hop. They begin to resist any movement that requires full extension or flexion of the rear legs.

They will experience stiffness and pain in their rear legs after exercising and on first rising in the morning. Climbing stairs becomes difficult if not impossible. Some dogs will limp and are less willing to participate in normal daily activities, including walks they formerly enjoyed.

It appears that the amount of calories a dog consumes, especially during its fast-growth period from three to ten months, has the biggest impact on whether or not a dog genetically prone to hip dysplasia will develop the disease.

Obesity can increase the severity of the disease in dogs that are genetically susceptible and the extra weight will intensify the degeneration of a dog’s joints and hips. Dogs who are genetically prone to hip dysplasia and also are overweight, are at a much higher risk of developing hip dysplasia and eventually osteoarthritis.

Exercise can be another risk factor. Dogs genetically susceptible to hip dysplasia may have an increased incidence of the disease if they are over-exercised at a young age. Moderate exercise like running and swimming is best for exercising young dogs.

Because hip dysplasia in Pointers is primarily an inherited condition, there are no products that can prevent its development.

Through proper diet, exercise, and a daily regimen of Winston’s Joint System, you can slow, and sometimes halt, the progression of these degenerative joint diseases while providing your dog with relief from its pain. Winston’s provides many of the raw materials essential for the synthesis of the joint-lubricating synovial fluid as well as the repair of articular cartilage and connective tissue.

There are different assumptions on how to prevent the progression of hip dysplasia in Pointers.

Poor nutrition, inadequate or improper exercise, and increased body weight may all contribute to the severity of osteoarthritis after the hip dysplasia has developed.
Watching the calories your puppy or young dog consumes and preventing obesity in your dog, allowing only non-stressful types of exercise, and a daily regimen of Winston’s Joint System, are the best things you can do for your dog.

Since 1990, Winston’s Joint System and Winston’s Pain Formula have helped heal over twenty thousand dogs from all over the world. Our staff specializes in hip dysplasia, arthritis and all joint, pain and mobility issues.
 
There is an excellent chance we can help your dog, so please contact us at: www.dogshealth.com or call our toll free number at 888-901-5557.

Hip Dysplasia in Collies

Monday, October 8th, 2012

Hip dysplasia in Collies is a disease of the hip in which the ball and socket joint is malformed.

Hip Dysplasia in Collies

Meet the Collies

Collies are friendly, loving and highly intelligent. They make gentle and loyal friends to the entire family, even to other pets in a household.

Even though they are devoted to their family, they can act very wary of strangers, making them appear to be standoffish or aloof.

Collies love to play and thrive on your attention, but they are low-maintenance, non-destructive, non-demanding dogs.

When it comes to guarding their family, collies are not as docile and heroic as Lassie was. If they sense a threat they will protect their family and household, but they prefer to be friendly companions. They love regular exercise, but don’t need a vigorous amount of exercise like some larger breed dogs.

Lassie was always rescuing Timmy, but you need to be aware that Collies are not natural born rescuers and can’t be relied upon to baby-sit your children or run back to your house to alert you when someone is hurt.

Collies need daily brushing and regular grooming to keep their coats from getting too frizzy. They are very sensitive to heat, and their noses easily sunburn.

They originated in Scotland and northern England, and for generations they were used for herding cows and sheep. After Queen Victoria embraced the breed, Collies became popular pets across Europe.

Collies have light, graceful frames and long, bushy coats. Their heads are lean and wedge-shaped with flat tops and thin faces. Their ears are usually pointed and their noses stick straight out. They have trim, muscular bodies and broad chests. Typical colors for Collies are sable, sable merle, blue merle, tricolor, and white with markings of the other colors.

A healthy Collie can live as long as 16 years. Unfortunately, Collies are very susceptible to developing hip dysplasia and arthritis.

Hip dysplasia in Collies

Hip dysplasia is a genetic disease that primarily affects large and giant breeds of dogs like Collies but can also affect medium-sized breeds and occasionally small breeds. It is primarily a disease of purebreds, although it can also occur in mixed breeds.

To understand hip dysplasia in Collies and the resulting arthritis, you need a basic understanding of how the dog’s hip joint is affected.

The hip joint is comprised of a ball and socket that forms the attachment of the hind leg to the body. The ball portion is the head of the femur and the socket is located on the pelvis.

In a normal hip joint the ball rotates freely within the socket. The bones are shaped to perfectly match each other with the socket surrounding the ball.

To strengthen the joint, the two bones are held together by a strong ligament. The joint capsule, a strong band of connective tissue, circles the two bones to provide added stability.

This is a normal hip joint:

normal hip joint

Hip dysplasia is linked to abnormal joint structure and a laxity of the muscles, connective tissue, and ligaments that would normally support the dog’s hip joints.

As the disease progresses, the articular surfaces of the two bones lose contact with each other. This separation of the two bones within the joint causes a drastic change in the size and shape of the articular surfaces.

This is a hip joint showing the results of hip dysplasia in Collies:

hip dysplasia joint

Most Collies who eventually develop hip dysplasia are born with normal hips, but due to their genetic make-up the soft tissues surrounding the joint develop abnormally. This leads to the symptoms associated with hip dysplasia. The disease may affect both hips, or only the right or left hip.

The symptoms of hip dysplasia in Collies cause afflicted dogs to walk or run with an altered gait, similar to a bunny-hop. They begin to resist any movement that requires full extension or flexion of the rear legs. They will experience stiffness and pain in their rear legs after exercising and on first rising in the morning. Climbing stairs becomes difficult if not impossible. Some dogs will limp and are less willing to participate in normal daily activities, including walks they formerly enjoyed.

It appears that the amount of calories a dog consumes, especially during its fast-growth period from three to ten months, has the biggest impact on whether or not a dog genetically prone to hip dysplasia will develop the disease.

Obesity can increase the severity of the disease in dogs that are genetically susceptible and the extra weight will intensify the degeneration of a dog’s joints and hips. Dogs who are genetically prone to hip dysplasia and also are overweight, are at a much higher risk of developing hip dysplasia and eventually osteoarthritis.

Exercise can be another risk factor. Dogs genetically susceptible to hip dysplasia may have an increased incidence of the disease if they are over-exercised at a young age. Moderate exercise like running and swimming is best for exercising young dogs.

Prevention

Because hip dysplasia in Collies is primarily an inherited condition, there are no products that can prevent its development.

Through proper diet, exercise, and a daily regimen of Winston’s Joint System, you can slow, and sometimes halt, the progression of these degenerative joint diseases while providing your dog with relief from its pain. Winston’s provides many of the raw materials essential for the synthesis of the joint-lubricating synovial fluid as well as the repair of articular cartilage and connective tissue.

You might also want to consider providing your dog with an orthopedic bed like the Canine Cooler Bed which distributes the dog’s weight evenly and reduces pressure on its joints. The Canine Cooler Bed uses revolutionary SoothSoft Technology to give your dog the very best in comfort, and the fluid-enhanced design offers a dry, cooling effect with superior cushioning and support. It’s perfect for dogs with hip dysplasia or arthritis.

There are different assumptions on how to prevent the progression of hip dysplasia in Collies.

Poor nutrition, inadequate or improper exercise, and increased body weight may all contribute to the severity of osteoarthritis after the hip dysplasia has developed. Watching the calories your puppy or young dog consumes and preventing obesity in your dog, allowing only non-stressful types of exercise, and a daily regimen of Winston’s Joint System, are the best things you can do for your pet Collie.

Since 1990, Winston’s Joint System and Winston’s Pain Formula have helped heal over twenty thousand dogs from all over the world. Our staff specializes in hip dysplasia, arthritis and all joint, pain and mobility issues.
 
There is an excellent chance we can help your dog, so please contact us at: www.dogshealth.com or call our toll free number at 888-901-5557.

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