Our Blog
The #1 source for immediate, long-term relief for dogs suffering from degenerative diseases like hip dysplasia, OCD and arthritis.

We are specialists in the treatment of canine joint disease and its accompanying pain.

Let us help put an end to your dog’s suffering, joint stiffness, pain, immobility, and poor quality of life. Our proven products will help you easily accomplish this without the use of drugs or invasive surgery.

Joint Issues

  • Hip Dysplasia
  • Arthritis
  • Osteochondritis (OCD)
  • Stiffness/Inflammation
  • Ligament Tears
  • Growing Pains
  • Mobility Problems
  • Joint Pain
  • Back/Spinal Problems
  • Hypertrophic Osteodystrophy (HOD)

Symptoms

Is your pet becoming less active, less playful, or desiring shorter walks? The following symptoms could be early signs of OCD, Arthritis or Hip Dysplasia.

  • Moving more slowly
  • Difficulty getting up
  • Weight shift to another leg
  • Personality change
  • Reluctant to walk, jump or play
  • Refuses using stairs or the car
  • Change in appetite
  • Change in behavior
  • Muscle atrophy
  • Lagging behind
  • Yelping when touched
  • Limping
We Can Help!
 

Posts Tagged ‘Protein for Dogs’

What Should a Dog Eat?

Monday, June 6th, 2016


What should a dog eat and how do you know if you’re giving your pet the best diet possible? There are so many different types of diets available for dogs today – dry food, canned food, raw meats, cooked meats, turkey, vegetables, and specialty blends.

The diet that you feed your dog will have an effect on its physical health, its weight, and the luster and health of its coat. If the diet you feed your dog lacks in needed vitamins and minerals, your dog can become restless, irritable, and tire easily. Certain foods can also cause dogs to become overly excited or nervous.

To be sure your dog is eating the healthiest diet possible, you need the right combination of vitamins and minerals as well as the right amounts of protein and carbohydrates.

Should a dog eat meat? Humans don’t need to eat meat to stay healthy but dogs do. A nutritious, well-balanced dog food should contain approximately 40% meat (to provide the protein), 50% vegetables, and 10% carbohydrates. If a dog’s diet is lacking in sufficient amounts of protein it can cause weight loss, muscle wasting and slow growth in younger dogs. A diet lacking in vegetables can lead to vitamin deficiencies, and carbohydrates are important to keep a dog’s thyroid functioning properly.

To maintain a healthy balance of the essential vitamins, minerals, and amino acids a dog needs for optimum health, select a dog food that contains vitamins A, D, E, and K, as well as Vitamin B1, B6, and B12, riboflavin, niacin, pantothenic acid, folic acid and choline.

There are twelve minerals that are critical to a dog’s health. These minerals are calcium, phosphorus, zinc, magnesium, Iodine, sodium, potassium, copper, chlorine, iron, manganese and selenium.

In addition, there are ten important amino acids dogs obtain from the food they eat that are necessary for correct body functioning. These amino acids are arginine, histidine, threonine, tryptophan, lysine, methionine, leucine, phenyalanine, valine and isoleucine. A dog needs these essential amino acids to build strong muscles and to control nerve impulses in its body.

A dog that does not receive sufficient vitamins, minerals and amino acids in its diet is susceptible to weakness, joint pain, gastrointestinal symptoms, increased heart rate, and enlargement of the thyroid gland.

There are other side effects of poor nutrition due to vitamin and mineral deficiencies. A deficiency in vitamin A can cause central nervous system depression and a deficiency of vitamin D can cause fatigue or exhaustion. A sodium deficiency can cause restlessness and a magnesium deficiency can cause irritability.

The best type of dog food your dog should eat is a high-quality, all-natural dog food containing adequate amounts of vitamins, minerals, and essential amino acids. A nutritious dog food should not contain by-products or synthetic additives. Buy the best food you can afford for your dog and you may enjoy many more years together.

Can Dogs Eat Frozen Food?

Monday, December 7th, 2015


Frozen dog foods are becoming popular in the pet food world. The major concern for most dog owners is the question, “Can dogs eat frozen food?”

Some dog owners are choosing to purchase commercially prepared raw foods for their pets with choices ranging from turkey, chicken, beef and lamb, to exotic meats like quail, rabbit and antelope.

These fully prepared meals can be made up of only ground meat, or meat with ground up bone and vegetables. The meals that contain only meat use muscle meat as well as organ meats like liver, heart and other organs that wild dogs consume.

If you want to feed your dog a vegetarian diet, there are frozen vegetable mixtures also available on the market.

Dogs are carnivores and they require a diet of raw meat and natural foods that have been prepared with minimal processing. For centuries a dog’s diet was mostly grain-free and contained a multitude of enzymes and antioxidants that dogs today do not get in heat-processed dog food.

To provide the natural proteins, antioxidants, enzymes, vitamins, and minerals a dog needs, raw meat that is free of hormones and antibiotics supplies a dog with the sources for these ingredients.

Many owners find that feeding pre-prepared frozen foods for their dog is a relatively easy way to assure that their pet is receiving the vitamins and minerals necessary to good health.

We recommend you visit one of the following online sites that offer these meals: www.naturesvariety.com, www.stevesrealfood.com, or www.darwinspet.com.

You may also want to consider supplementing one of these prepared raw food diets with raw bones. Meat doesn’t contain a sufficient amount of calcium for a dog’s body, so dogs in the wild receive the bulk of their calcium by consuming bones which provide the additional nutrients a dog needs.

Raw bones should not be cooked. When cooked they become brittle and can break into pieces in your dog’s digestive system. If your dog has a tendency to eat too fast, you can feed it frozen bones that have been slightly thawed. This will force your dog to spend more time eating the bone.

In addition to raw food and bones, many companies sell frozen treats for dogs that look like ice cream tidbits and popsicles that we humans eat. The treats are made from dog-friendly foods like peanut butter, bananas and berries and most dogs find them to be delicious and special snacks.

Dogs can eat frozen foods and will usually like them.

If you’re interested in feeding your dog raw foods you can visit one of the raw pet food sites listed above, or start out by buying fresh raw meat at your grocers and begin feeding your dog small amounts of meat to see if it can easily digest it.

Should Dogs Eat Cat Food?

Monday, June 22nd, 2015


The question “Should dogs eat cat food?” is often asked by owners who have both dogs and cats living together because it’s often difficult to keep a dog from eating the cat’s food.

Cat food usually has higher levels of protein and fat than dog food and many dogs find that combination very appetizing. Cat food is also more likely to be left out all day long allowing a cat to eat when it wants, whereas dog food tends to be served only at mealtimes. Dogs have a tendency to eat whatever they find tasty, regardless of whether they’re hungry or not.

Cat food and dog food have different formulations because cats and dogs have different nutritional requirements. Cats are carnivores and must eat meat in order to maintain their health. Dogs eat cat food because they are omnivores, meaning they eat both meat-based foods and plant-based foods. Cats usually don’t bother eating a dog’s food because cats need certain B-complex vitamins that dog food doesn’t contain.

Will your dog get sick if it eats cat food? Usually only if it overindulges on cat food. If this happens the dog is likely to suffer digestive discomfort, including diarrhea and vomiting due to higher fat levels in cat food.

If your dog sneaks an occasional small amount of cat food it won’t harm its health, but if allowed to eat cat food over an extended period of time, it will probably become overweight and will lack some of the vital nutrients in dog food that are lacking in cat food.

Over time, a dog could also develop kidney problems if its excretory system is unable to remove the extra protein found in cat food. This extra protein becomes urea which is a nitrogenous compound found in the urine of an animal and is produced by the breakdown of protein.

Keeping your dog out of the cat’s food requires some rearranging. Try putting the dog and cat food bowls in different parts of the house. You could put the dog’s food in the kitchen and the cat’s food in the laundry room. If that doesn’t work, try giving the cat its food on something higher than you feed the dog on, like a countertop which cats will find easy to climb up on but a dog won’t.

Hopefully one of those tricks will work. If not you may want to install a cat door on the laundry room door that’s too small for your dog to get through. Dogs eat cat food simply because it’s food and it’s accessible. If a dog can’t get to it, the problem will end.

Vegetarian Dog Food Recipes

Monday, December 15th, 2014


Dogs need to consume a lot of protein to remain healthy. If you’ve decided that you want your dog to be a vegetarian, you may want to try these vegetarian dog food recipes to be sure you’re feeding your pet a healthy diet.

You should understand that vegetables alone will not supply the protein your dog needs to be healthy and hearty. To provide the missing protein and still maintain a vegetarian diet, include beans, dairy products, eggs or protein supplements in your dog’s vegetarian diet.

For a hearty and delicious Vegetable Stew, prepare this recipe for your dog:
Heat up a small amount of olive oil and a little garlic in a saucepan. Cut into slices the following vegetables: one large sweet pepper, one medium zucchini, one medium yellow squash, one medium eggplant, and one potato.
Bring the mixture to a boil and let it simmer for 40 minutes, adding a small amount of oregano or basil.

Let the stew cool before serving it to your dog. You can also add shredded cheese, beans, a raw egg or a protein supplement to make sure your dog is receiving a suitable amount of protein.

This is another vegetarian dog food recipe any dog should find appetizing:
Mix one cup of quick-cooking oats, 1/4 cup of soy flour or soy milk powder, 1/4 cup of wheat bran, one tablespoon of soy lechithin, one tablespoon of yeast, one tablespoon of wheat germ, one tablespoon of ground sunflower seeds, 1/4 tablespoon of molasses, one teaspoon of ground flax seed, and 1/2 tablespoon of olive oil or canola oil.

Soak all the ingredients in hot water for 20 minutes before serving to your dog. This is an easy meal to make in advance and keep refrigerated or frozen for a quick and healthy daily meal for your dog. If you have a large dog you’ll need to double the recipe. Ground pinto beans can also be added for additional protein.

This is a recipe for a Vegetarian Chowder your dog is sure to love:
Thoroughly cook two red potatoes in two cups of water, adding two tablespoons of olive oil and a clove of garlic. Remove the potatoes from the water. Add three cups of fresh corn to the water and cook for five minutes. Add to the corn 3/4 cup of cooked kidney beans and the potato water you set aside. Bring to a boil, then simmer until the corn is tender. Blend the red potatoes with 3/4 of a cup of milk in a blender or food processor and add it to the simmering chowder.

Vegetarian Dog Food Cookies:
Mash a cup of peas, green beans, squash, zucchini, and carrots. Add one egg, 1/3 cup applesauce, a cup of cooked rice and a teaspoon of brewer’s yeast.

Drop a teaspoonful of the mixture onto a cookie sheet and bake at 350 degrees for 12 minutes. These delicious doggy cookies can be stored in your refrigerator or freezer and given to your dog as a treat at any time.

A recipe for Yummy Veggie Biscuits:
Mix three cups of parsley and 1/4 cup carrots, finely chopped. Add 2 tablespoons of olive oil. In a separate bowl mix 2 and 3/4 cups of whole wheat flour, two tablespoons of bran and two teaspoons of baking powder. Combine this mixture with the vegetables. Add one-half to one cup of water and mix well until the dough is moist but not wet. Knead the dough and roll it out.

Use a cookie cutter to create cookies in any shape you want, then bake them on a cookie sheet for 20 to 30 minutes at 350 degrees. This is a healthy and delicious treat for your dog.

We sincerely hope your dog will love these vegetarian dog food recipes.

Puppy Food vs. Adult Dog Food

Monday, November 17th, 2014


Puppies have different nutrition needs than adult dogs. Puppies go through several stages of development very quickly and require a special diet, while adult dogs only need to eat to maintain their proper weight and good health. Puppy food is for puppies and adult dog food is for dogs who have outgrown their puppyhood.

In the first few months of a puppy’s life, it will cycle through many changes including cognitive development, muscle development, bone and joint development, internal organ growth, and development of its immune system.

In order for puppies to meet these requirements, they will need to eat more protein than adult dogs. Puppy foods are formulated with a higher protein count, but the quality of the protein is very important. Check the labels on any puppy food you’re considering buying to be sure the first three ingredients are protein sources, not “meat by-products” or grains such as corn, white rice or wheat. Omega 3 and 6 fatty acids are also important, but if they are not listed on the puppy food label you can easily buy the capsules at any grocery or drugstore.

Puppy foods containing some fats will provide energy and make the food more appetizing to a puppy. Puppies require 25 percent protein and 17 percent fat content in their food. Calcium and phosphorus are also important for the proper growth and development of a puppy’s teeth.

You should vary the type of food and sources of protein while a puppy is young, gradually introducing different foods to its diet. A dog’s stomach is designed to attack any foreign object, including a different type of food after becoming accustomed to only one taste or type of food for a long period of time.

Puppies usually are switched to adult dog food between the ages of one and two years. Smaller dog breeds will mature more quickly than larger breeds and may begin eating adult dog food when they are as young as one year. Larger breed dogs may not be able to eat adult dog food until they are at least two years old.

When a puppy starts putting on extra weight you may be overfeeding it or giving it a food with too many fillers that a puppy can’t digest.

Adult dog food is unlike a puppy’s food because an adult dog’s nutritional requirements are very different given that they have stopped growing and developing. They need fewer calories and a more balanced diet to maintain healthy bones, muscles and internal organs. Adult dogs require at least 18 percent protein and 15 percent fat.

As in puppies, the quality of protein for adult dogs is just as important, and the first three ingredients in an adult dog’s food should also contain protein from the healthiest sources available. There are many cheap dog foods on the market these days, especially dry foods like kibble, so please, please carefully read the labels on these foods and choose the best and healthiest food you can afford for your dog.

Proper nutrition is important for a dog at all stages of its life but is even more important during a dog’s first year while important development in its body is taking place. Shop wisely and buy the best puppy food and adult dog food your budget can handle.

© 2010-2017 DogsHealth.Com