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We are specialists in the treatment of canine joint disease and its accompanying pain.

Let us help put an end to your dog’s suffering, joint stiffness, pain, immobility, and poor quality of life. Our proven products will help you easily accomplish this without the use of drugs or invasive surgery.

Joint Issues

  • Hip Dysplasia
  • Arthritis
  • Osteochondritis (OCD)
  • Stiffness/Inflammation
  • Ligament Tears
  • Growing Pains
  • Mobility Problems
  • Joint Pain
  • Back/Spinal Problems
  • Hypertrophic Osteodystrophy (HOD)

Symptoms

Is your pet becoming less active, less playful, or desiring shorter walks? The following symptoms could be early signs of OCD, Arthritis or Hip Dysplasia.

  • Moving more slowly
  • Difficulty getting up
  • Weight shift to another leg
  • Personality change
  • Reluctant to walk, jump or play
  • Refuses using stairs or the car
  • Change in appetite
  • Change in behavior
  • Muscle atrophy
  • Lagging behind
  • Yelping when touched
  • Limping
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Posts Tagged ‘Osteochondrosis’

Dogs With OCD

Monday, July 11th, 2016

Dogs with OCD (or Osteochondrosis) suffer a great deal of pain and mobility issues.

When a dog has OCD, fragments of bone and cartilage become detached from larger bones and end up floating around the area encompassing a dog’s joints. The result is that any movement in the joint where those fragments are located will cause a dog to suffer from severe pain.

Dogs With OCD (or osteochondrosis)

What is Osteochondrosis (OCD)

OCD is a congenital problem that usually affects only larger dogs who seem to be predisposed to the condition.

The best way to understand the true cause of this condition is that it is a disease of the cartilage that results in large pieces of cartilage and bone becoming detached and floating freely. This causes a dog with OCD a lot of pain.

These free floating bone and cartilage pieces can lead to the development of arthritis, hip dysplasia, secondary degenerative joint disease, or other side effects.

There are several variations of osteochondrosis (OCD), and all typically affect the dog’s joints at the ankle, shoulder, elbow and knee on one or both sides of a dog’s body.

The different types of OCD are distinguished by their location on a dog’s body. They are also differentiated from each other based on the severity and the primary cause of the condition.

It’s more common for OCD to affect the forelimbs than a dog’s hind feet and legs.

Symptoms of OCD in dogs

To properly treat and identify OCD in your pet, you need to be able to recognize the symptoms of this disease. OCD can develop at any stage of a dog’s life, although it is more common in younger dogs than in older ones.

Dogs with OCD will show some of the following warning signs:

  • Pain when the affected limb is touched;
  • Muscle degeneration on the affected side of the dog’s body;
  • A general limitation of movement;
  • Lameness or difficulty moving around.

How to diagnose and treat OCD in dogs

A veterinarian will diagnose osteochondrosis using a series of X-ray tests.

Treatment of the disease requires lifestyle changes. The dog’s exercise routine must be changed to ensure that the dog can remain active and suffer fewer mobility problems.

Dogs suffering with joint diseases like OCD, arthritis, bursitis, hip dysplasia and other degenerative problems with the shoulders, elbows and hocks can find immediate and long-term relief without drugs with a regular regimen of Winston’s Joint System, a combination of three, totally-natural whole food supplements developed by a Naturopathic Doctor for his own dog. Winston’s contains no drugs and there are no side-effects.

Winston’s Pain Formula is another product proven to be fast acting and highly effective in relieving the pain in a dog caused by these diseases. Both of these products help your dog to recover much faster.

Dogs with OCD will require a change in diet and careful observation to prevent overfeeding and weight gain which contribute to damage of the joints due to OCD. Work with your vet to determine if your dog’s diet is properly supporting its joint health or if it can be changed to be more effective.

Since 1990, Winston’s Joint System and Winston’s Pain Formula have helped heal over twenty thousand dogs from all over the world. Our staff specializes in hip dysplasia, arthritis and all joint, pain and mobility issues.
 
There is an excellent chance we can help your dog, so please contact us at: www.dogshealth.com or call our toll free number at 888-901-5557.

Hip Dysplasia in German Shepherds

Tuesday, December 21st, 2010

Hip dysplasia in German Shepherds is, sadly, a pretty common health issue. According to the Orthopedic Foundation for Animals, approximately 15 percent of all German Shepherds born between 2000 and 2002 were diagnosed as suffering from hip dysplasia.

Hip Dysplasia in German Shepherds

What hip dysplasia in German Shepherds means

To better understand what it means when your veterinarian diagnoses hip dysplasia in your German Shepherd, it helps to have at least a cursory knowledge of the basics of this debilitating condition.

Hip dysplasia is caused whenever a looseness occurs in the joint between the femur and pelvis. Over time this looseness causes damage to the femoral head and to the socket and they no longer fit together properly.

⇒ Learn more about canine hip dysplasia: “What Is Hip Dysplasia In Dogs – Causes & Symptoms

Osteoarthritis, or degenerative joint disease (DJD), often accompanies hip dysplasia, causing additional pain and disability. This damage then causes arthritic changes in the joint which reduces the range of motion and causes pain and inflammation.

Some of the symptoms and signs of hip dysplasia in German Shepherds:

  • Moving more slowly
  • Difficulty getting up and/or lying down
  • Weight shift to another leg
  • Limping
  • Personality, behavior and/or appetite changes
  • Reluctance to walk, jump or play
  • Refusing to use stairs or get in the car
  • Yelping when touched
  • Muscle atrophy

Hip dysplasia is considered to be the most common inherited orthopedic disease in large dog breeds and millions of dogs are affected by it. Currently there is no genetic test for hip dysplasia due to its complex genetic nature.

German Shepherds with almost identical genetic makeups may have a wide range of differences in what degree of hip dysplasia they display as adults.

This fact can be attributed to the differences of environmental influences on the development of the hip joint, and especially the effect of diet on puppies and young German Shepherds.

Proper nutrition is essential for the development of a strong healthy dog. However, poor or excessive nutrition can exacerbate genetic tendencies to develop hip dysplasia.

Treatment

Although there is no actual cure for canine hip dysplasia, arthritis, or osteochondrosis (OCD), regular treatment with Winston’s Joint System will give immediate and long-term relief without drugs.

Winston’s is a combination of three, totally-natural whole food supplements developed by a Naturopathic Doctor for his own dog. There are no side-effects because it’s just good whole food. In addition, there are no dosage problems because the dog’s body uses only what it needs.

⇒ Learn more about surgical, medical and natural treatments: “Diagnosis And Treatment Of Hip Dysplasia

Diagnosis

Although canine hip dysplasia (CHD) may remain unseen in some dogs, early detection is critical.

The first step to determining whether a German Shepherd has hip dysplasia is through a careful physical examination by a veterinarian who will observe the dog as it sits, stands, and walks.

This is the first measure to check for characteristic signs of hip dysplasia such as a side-to-side swinging gait, lameness, and arched back which is caused by shifting weight forward, or the presence of overdeveloped front-leg and shoulder muscles.

X-rays are the easiest way to diagnose hip dysplasia. A vet will evaluate the joints and take into consideration any symptoms like those listed above because sometimes an x-ray won’t reveal the full extent of the dog’s pain. The vet will also consider the dog’s movements and any evidence of lameness before making a diagnosis.

The veterinarian will move the dog’s hip joint to assess its range of motion and check for pain with the joint extended. The vet will also listen for the “click” of the hip popping out of joint and for any grating sound of bone on bone that indicates cartilage loss.

At the first signs of hip dysplasia, make an appointment with your veterinarian and discuss with him or her the symptoms you have been noticing in your dog.
The sooner you can begin treatment, the less pain your beloved dog will experience and you may be lucky enough to extend the life of your friend and companion.

Since 1990, Winston’s Joint System and Winston’s Pain Formula have helped heal over twenty thousand dogs from all over the world. Our staff specializes in hip dysplasia, arthritis and all joint, pain and mobility issues.
 
There is an excellent chance we can help your dog, so please contact us at: www.dogshealth.com or call our toll free number at 888-901-5557.

Hip Dysplasia in Labradors

Tuesday, December 14th, 2010

Hip dysplasia in Labradors is a genetic disease that can cause crippling, lameness and severe arthritic pain in a dog’s joints.

For Labradors that are genetically prone to hip dysplasia, symptoms can occur in puppies that are just a few months old or they can strike later in a dog’s life.

Hip Dysplasia in Labradors

Causes & symptoms of hip dysplasia in Labradors

There are a number of causative factors that determine whether a Labrador will develop hip dysplasia.

The most important being the genetic make-up of the dog (whether its parents and grand-parents had hip dysplasia), the type of diet being fed the dog, and obesity, which puts additional strain and weight on hip joints that become weak from hip dysplasia, arthritis, or osteochondrosis (OCD).

It is not possible to predict when, or even if, hip dysplasia will occur in a dog.

However, there are some easily noticeable symptoms of hip dysplasia which include moving more slowly, difficulty in getting up or lying down, reluctance to walk, jump or play, refusing to use stairs or get into the car, muscle atrophy, limping, yelping when touched, changes in appetite, and personality changes.

Labradors who develop hip dysplasia, arthritis or OCD, suffer from pain and stiffness in their joints which greatly diminishes their ability to live a quality life and remain active.

Treatment of hip dysplasia in Labradors

When a Lab is diagnosed with hip dysplasia and the choices for treatment seem limited to expensive surgery or questionable drugs, I recommend you begin treating your dog with Winston’s Joint System, an all-natural formula developed by a Naturopathic Doctor to heal his own beloved dog. This proven formula has been giving relief from pain and stiffness to all breeds and ages of dogs for more than 20 years.

All Labradors have different temperaments, different pain thresholds and different bodies. Some may be able to cope with the pain and discomfort for a long time before showing any signs of hip dysplasia or arthritis.

X-rays are the easiest way to diagnose hip dysplasia in Labradors. A vet will evaluate the joints and take into consideration any symptoms like those listed above because sometimes an x-ray won’t reveal the full extent of the dog’s pain. The vet will also consider the dog’s movements and any evidence of lameness before making a diagnosis.

Although there is no actual cure for canine hip dysplasia, arthritis, or osteochondrosis (OCD), regular treatment with Winston’s Joint System will give immediate and long-term relief without drugs.

Winston’s is a combination of three, totally-natural whole food supplements. There are no side-effects because it’s just good whole food. In addition, there are no dosage problems because the dog’s body uses only what it needs.

⇒ Read more about the diagnosis and treatment methods of hip dysplasia.

Exercise and weight control are also vitally important. A dog’s weight, together with exercise, helps in the development of cartilage growth and aids in reducing pain and discomfort.

Surgery is normally only considered in cases of Labrador hip dysplasia if all other treatments have failed to improve the dog’s condition.

This procedure is expensive and the recovery time for a dog can be considerably lengthened if the post-surgical dog is not cared for properly. The desired result of any surgical procedure is to provide an acceptable quality of life for the Lab, so surgery should be considered only if a vet is reasonably certain of success.

The most successful joint modification surgery involves reshaping or replacing the femur, or realigning the hip socket. This surgery is only recommended for younger dogs.

Older and heavier dogs who suffer from hip dysplasia are generally not considered good candidates for the surgery.

There is a fairly high incidence of mortality for older dogs undergoing this procedure and that is something you need to discuss frankly with your vet if surgery is recommended.

You want your beautiful Lab to be with you as long as possible so please watch for any signs or symptoms of hip dysplasia or arthritis, and begin early treatment of your pet with Winston’s Joint System.

Since 1990, Winston’s Joint System and Winston’s Pain Formula have helped heal over twenty thousand dogs from all over the world. Our staff specializes in hip dysplasia, arthritis and all joint, pain and mobility issues.
 
There is an excellent chance we can help your dog, so please contact us at: www.dogshealth.com or call our toll free number at 888-901-5557.

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