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The #1 source for immediate, long-term relief for dogs suffering from degenerative diseases like hip dysplasia, OCD and arthritis.

We are specialists in the treatment of canine joint disease and its accompanying pain.

Let us help put an end to your dog’s suffering, joint stiffness, pain, immobility, and poor quality of life. Our proven products will help you easily accomplish this without the use of drugs or invasive surgery.

Joint Issues

  • Hip Dysplasia
  • Arthritis
  • Osteochondritis (OCD)
  • Stiffness/Inflammation
  • Ligament Tears
  • Growing Pains
  • Mobility Problems
  • Joint Pain
  • Back/Spinal Problems
  • Hypertrophic Osteodystrophy (HOD)

Symptoms

Is your pet becoming less active, less playful, or desiring shorter walks? The following symptoms could be early signs of OCD, Arthritis or Hip Dysplasia.

  • Moving more slowly
  • Difficulty getting up
  • Weight shift to another leg
  • Personality change
  • Reluctant to walk, jump or play
  • Refuses using stairs or the car
  • Change in appetite
  • Change in behavior
  • Muscle atrophy
  • Lagging behind
  • Yelping when touched
  • Limping
We Can Help!
 

Posts Tagged ‘Large Dog Breeds’

Best Dog Breeds For Families With Kids

Monday, May 16th, 2016


Almost 75 million dogs have been adopted into homes that already owned at least one dog. Multi-dog homes are often good for families with kids. There are other dogs to play with so a dog is not expecting constant attention from your children, or you, all the time, and there is always another dog to play with when the family is away from home.

If you’re considering adopting your very first dog or you want to replace a cherished pet that is no longer with you, it can sometimes be difficult finding the right dog for your family. All dogs are not created equal and each breed has specific traits that may or may not fit into your family situation.

Deciding which dog will make the best pet for your children depends on several things. One being whether someone in the family will have the time to give the dog plenty of exercise. You also need to consider whether a small, quiet dog or a larger, active dog fits the lifestyle of you and your children. Do you have a large home or a home with a yard? Will there be someone at home most of the time?

Answering these questions can help you decide on which breed of dog is best suited to your family’s lifestyle.

Where to find your pet is also an important consideration. Some people prefer to buy a dog from a breeder if they are searching for a purebred. But if you just want the best companion dog you can find for your family, an animal shelter or pet adoption center is probably your best choice. Pet adoption agencies and animal shelters help find homes for loving animals that have, for any number of reasons, ended up neglected, unloved, or unwanted.

The dog of your dreams may right now be living an unhappy, solitary life in the confines of an animal shelter cage. These dogs are so happy to be rescued and given a second chance at life, that they will heap loads of love on your children. Ask the staff at an animal shelter or pet adoption center to help you determine which breed of dog is right for your family.

The following breeds of dogs will provide excellent companionship, loyalty and love:

Labrador Retrievers are the most popular dog breed of all. Labrador Retrievers are friendly, lovable, smart and great with kids. They are the most popular family dog according to breeder surveys.

Golden Retrievers make great family dogs. These large dogs are extremely kind and gentle by nature and they love to play with people of any age. They can also entertain themselves with their toys so they’re not always bothering a member of the household. Just make sure you have enough space in your home as Golden Retrievers can grow to be as large as 90 pounds.

Yorkshire Terriers, also called “Yorkies” for short, are the smallest terriers of all. These tiny dogs are energetic and very protective of their owners, both adults and children. As a result, they don’t always get along well with strangers and they’re not afraid to let a visitor know. Expect a lot of “yapping” if you adopt one of these dogs.

German Shepherds are one of the most intelligent and loyal dog breeds in the world. Because of their high intelligence and great strength they make a great family pet as long as you have room for a large, lovable dog.

The Beagle has been a popular breed for over a century. These cute, lovable dogs were originally raised as hunting dogs and are known for being kind and gentle. They make great family pets.

Dachshunds are also called “wiener dogs’ and have always been a favorite with adults and children because of their cute, sausage-shaped bodies. With long bodies and short legs they look like they couldn’t move very fast but they love to run and play with their owners and each other. They can be very protective and may nip at strangers and other dogs.

Boxers play well with children, are extremely loyal and are low maintenance. They aren’t the most intelligent dogs, but they make up for it by being energetic, headstrong, and fun-loving. They require strong obedience training while they’re young or they may turn out to be unmanageable when they grow into adults.

Poodles come in both standard and miniature sizes. They are popular dogs and are beautiful, loyal and extremely intelligent.

Miniature Schnauzers are smart, obedient and enjoy non-aggressive play with children and adults. They make great pets if you’re looking for a small, lovable dog.

The best dog breed for families with kids is ultimately a personal decision that you as a parent must make. If possible, help save the life of a dog confined to a shelter or pet adoption facility. You’ll never regret the love and devotion a rescued animal will give you and your children.

Health Problems in Older Dogs

Monday, September 7th, 2015

Owners of older dogs face special challenges in keeping their pets healthy. This necessitates remaining attentive to all the signs and symptoms of health problems in older dogs if you want to keep your pet healthy for as long as possible.

Health Problems in Older Dogs

Dogs are considered to have reached old age by the last third of the typical lifespan for their breed.

If you notice that your senior dog seems to have less energy than it used to, it’s simply due to a natural slowing of the dog’s metabolism.

Older dogs are at an increased risk of developing diseases in their later years. Common health problems in older dogs include arthritis, hip dysplasia, congestive heart failure, and kidney failure.

If you’ve allowed your dog to become obese or seriously overweight, it places extra stress on the dog and worsens all of these conditions. Therefore, it’s important to maintain an older dog’s ideal weight by combining the right diet and sufficient exercise.

Older dogs are more accident-prone than younger dogs, so it’s imperative that you help your dog prevent falling over objects in the house or yard. Also watch for large cracks and uplifted areas of sidewalks when taking your dog for a walk.

Health problems in older dogs

Three of the most serious health problems in older dogs are:

Arthritis and Hip Dysplasia
Arthritis usually worsens with age or may not develop until a dog is older. The disease causes significant joint pain and stiffness in dogs. A dog suffering from arthritis will experience impaired mobility and will limp or have difficulty running and climbing stairs.

Hip dysplasia is an abnormality of the hip joint and is one of the main causes of severe arthritis.

Regular non-strenuous exercise, combined with nutritional supplements like Winston’s Joint System, will help lessen the pain and discomfort caused by arthritis and hip dysplasia. Winston’s was designed to help dogs suffering with joint diseases like arthritis, bursitis, osteochondrosis (OCD), hip dysplasia and other degenerative problems obtain long-term relief without drugs.

Winston’s Pain Formula is an excellent addition to help ease a dog’s pain and discomfort. This powerful and natural pain relief product is fast-acting and highly effective. It works exceptionally well with Winston’s Joint System to help a dog recover much faster.

It’s also important that an obese or overweight dog lose weight to help take the pressure off its stressed joints caused by the arthritis or hip dysplasia.

Sleeping can also be a problem when the pain of arthritis or hip dysplasia is severe. To ease the pain in your dog, I recommend using the Canine Cooler Bed to soothe your dog’s inflammation and painful joints. It has really helped my older dog and he loves his bed.

Congestive Heart Failure
Congestive heart failure is a painful condition that can affect a dog at any age, but older and overweight dogs are more apt to succumb to this disease. Dogs with congestive heart failure accumulate fluid in their lung and chest cavities because their weakened heart can no longer efficiently pump their blood.

The symptoms of congestive heart failure include coughing, difficulty breathing, bluish tongue and gums, dizzy spells, sudden fatigue, a potbellied-looking abdomen, and weight loss. There is no cure for this disease and treatment consists only of drug therapy and vitamin supplements.

Your dog will need to be fed foods low in sodium and high in protein. Regular exercise is also very important. Should your dog collapse during exercise or any other activity, seek medical attention immediately as this is an emergency situation.

Kidney Failure
Aging usually impairs kidney function in dogs and can result in kidney failure.

Chronic kidney disease sometimes goes undetected for years. You should be alert to the symptoms of kidney disease which include excessive thirst, excessive urination, weight loss, and fatigue.

Being proactive about health problems in older dogs

Keeping your dog healthy becomes very important when it reaches old age. Graying hair and irritability are common in senior dogs but never assume that physical and behavioral changes are simply due to old age.

Keeping track of your dog’s illness symptoms, staying on schedule for its check-up appointments, and providing preventative care will help keep your dog feeling and acting younger.

Being proactive about your dog’s health will directly impact its life expectancy and ensure that any disease can be diagnosed at its beginning and treated in the early stages, improving the odds for recovery, or at least a more comfortable existence for you beloved pet as it ages.

Since 1990, Winston’s Joint System and Winston’s Pain Formula have helped heal over twenty thousand dogs from all over the world. Our staff specializes in hip dysplasia, arthritis and all joint, pain and mobility issues.
 
There is an excellent chance we can help your dog, so please contact us at: www.dogshealth.com or call our toll free number at 888-901-5557.

Dogs Who Develop Hip Dysplasia

Monday, March 2nd, 2015

Hip dysplasia is a genetic disease that primarily affects large and giant breeds of dogs but can also affect medium-sized breeds, and some small breeds. It is primarily a disease of purebreds, although it can also occur in mixed breeds.

Dogs Who Develop Hip Dysplasia: X-ray

Dogs who develop hip dysplasia suffer from an abnormal joint structure and a laxity of the muscles, connective tissue, and ligaments that would normally support the dog’s hip joints.

As the disease progresses, the articular surfaces of the two bones lose contact with each other. This separation of the two bones within the joint causes a drastic change in the size and shape of the articular surfaces.

Most dogs who develop hip dysplasia are born with normal hips, but due to their genetic make-up the soft tissues surrounding the joint develop abnormally. This leads to the symptoms associated with hip dysplasia. The disease may affect both hips, or only the right or left hip.

The symptoms of hip dysplasia cause afflicted dogs to walk or run with an altered gait, similar to a bunny-hop. They begin to resist any movement that requires full extension or flexion of the rear legs. They will experience stiffness and pain in their rear legs after exercising and on first rising in the morning. Climbing stairs becomes difficult if not impossible. Some dogs will limp and are less willing to participate in normal daily activities, including walks they formerly enjoyed.

Because hip dysplasia is primarily an inherited condition, there are no products that can prevent its development.

Through proper diet, exercise, and a supplement such as Winston’s Joint System, you can slow, and sometimes halt, the progression of these degenerative joint diseases while providing your dog with relief from its pain. Winston’s provides many of the raw materials essential for the synthesis of the joint-lubricating synovial fluid as well as the repair of articular cartilage and connective tissue.

Dogs who develop hip dysplasia

Dogs who are prone to develop hip dysplasia include the following (alphabetical order):

** This is by no means a complete list of dogs who can develop hip dysplasia.

It is also important to understand that just because your dog’s breed is on this list, it does NOT mean that it will develop hip dysplasia at some point in its life.

Since 1990, Winston’s Joint System and Winston’s Pain Formula have helped heal over twenty thousand dogs from all over the world. Our staff specializes in hip dysplasia, arthritis and all joint, pain and mobility issues.
 
There is an excellent chance we can help your dog, so please contact us at: www.dogshealth.com or call our toll free number at 888-901-5557.

Does a Lump Mean a Dog Has Cancer

Monday, September 1st, 2014


A lump under a dog’s skin doesn’t mean a dog has cancer and you shouldn’t be alarmed if you find your pet has developed one. However, lumps under the skin aren’t always benign, so it’s important to regularly check your dog, and if you find a lump have it tested.

According to the National Canine Cancer Foundation, 3 out of every 10 dogs will develop cancer at some point in their lifetimes. It may surprise you to know that approximately 50 percent of all dogs that die after they’re 10 years old will pass away as a result of some form of dog cancer.

If a dog is lucky enough to have an owner who is vigilant about its health, a dog receiving early cancer treatment can be cured or have years added to its life.

As a responsible dog owner, you should check your dog’s skin every few weeks for any growths. If you find one, keep close watch on it for the next week or two and see if it increases in size. It could be something as simple as an insect bite which will go away in a few days. If the lump persists or grows larger, make an appointment with your veterinarian. Any lump that seems to have suddenly appeared overnight and grown rapidly should be checked to be safe.

The vet will examine your dog, checking the size of the lump and testing to see if it causes your dog any pain. The vet will remove some of the cells in the lump using a small needle so as not to hurt the dog. The purpose of this procedure is to see if any cancerous cells are visible. However, the needle aspiration is not always accurate so most vets will want to perform a biopsy on the lump to check for cancerous cells.

The vet will surgically remove a portion of the lump and the tissue surrounding it. It’s then sent to a lab for testing. The results will tell the vet whether the lump is just a fat deposit or whether it’s malignant. If it is malignant the vet will have to remove it.

If a dog has cancer, the surgical procedure it will undergo is not complicated. First, the dog is sedated, then the area around the lump is shaved and disinfected. The dog will be given anesthesia to keep it asleep and pain free while the surgery is performed.

The doctor will use a scalpel to remove the lump and all surrounding tissue. Blood vessels feeding the lump will be cauterized or tied off, and the lump is then removed. The incision is stitched up and covered with a bandage. Most dogs will have a cone placed around their neck to prevent them from licking and scratching the wound as it heals.

Cancer is more easily treated in dogs than it is in humans. Caring and loving your pet requires you to always be on the lookout for any lumps or masses under its skin that could indicate a serious problem. Never ignore a lump that is increasing in size and hope that it will go away with the passage of time.

A Dog’s Lifespan

Monday, April 14th, 2014

A dog’s lifespan varies widely by the type of breed, and also its size. All dog breeds belong to the same species, evolved from the wolf, yet they age at very different rates and no one understands why there is such a variance. Some dog breeds live to be 16 to 20 years old, whereas breeds like the Irish Wolfhound have a life expectancy of only 6 to 8 years.


If you’re considering adopting an adult dog or a puppy, and you’re concerned about the dog’s lifespan, the best advice is – think small.

Around 40% of small breed dogs live longer than 10 years. In contrast, only 13% of giant breed dogs will live that long. The average 50-pound dog has a lifespan of 10 to 12 years, while a giant breed like the Great Dane is considered senior or elderly at 6 to 8 years of age. Dogs that weigh less than 30 pounds live the longest.

In a study involving more than 700 dogs and 77 different breeds, researchers found that a dog’s weight and size are the chief determining factors in a dog’s lifespan. It’s not unusual for a miniature poodle to live for 16 or 17 years, while a 12-year-old Labrador Retriever is considered an old dog. Giant breeds that weigh more than 100 pounds are considered geriatric when they reach 6 to 7 years of age.

A good rule of thumb is the larger the dog, the fewer years it will live. If you want a dog that will live for a long time you may want to consider adopting a mixed breed rather than a purebred, which on the whole usually have shorter lifespans than most mixed breeds.

When deciding between a male or female dog, remember that females tend to live a little longer than males, mimicking the human condition in this respect.

If you’re considering a purebred dog, it’s a good idea to research the types of ailments and diseases specific to the breed before deciding. Many large-breed dogs like Golden Retrievers, German Shepherds and Doberman Pinschers will develop hip dysplasia and the condition can become so serious that the dog will have to be euthanized.

Cancer is a common disease that can significantly shorten a dog’s lifespan, and some breeds like Boxers, Rottweilers, and Golden Retrievers have unusually high rates of cancer. Cancer is the most common cause of death in older dogs and nearly 42% of those dogs die from some form of cancer.

Flat-faced dogs such as Pugs and Shih Tzus, are predisposed to breathing problems that can cause overheating and even death. Cavalier King Charles Spaniels are likely to develop a heart condition called mitral valve disease. Cocker Spaniels are susceptible to recurring ear and eye infections.

Being a responsible pet owner means seeing that your dog has the correct type and amount of nourishment, and proper exercise. Very important for a dog’s lifespan is the prevention of obesity which will help your dog live a longer, healthier life.

The American Kennel Club has published a list of the most popular dog breeds and their average life span:

Beagles — 12 to 14 years
Boston terriers — about 15 years
Boxers — 11 to 14 years
Bulldogs — 10 to 12 years
Chihuahuas — 15 years or more
Dachshunds — 12 to 14 years
Doberman Pinschers — 10 to 12 years
German Shepherd dog — 10 to 14 years
German shorthaired pointers — 12 to 15 years
Golden retriever — 10 to 12 years
Labrador retriever — 10 to 14 years
Miniature Schnauzers — 15 years or more
Pomeranians — 13 to 15 years
Poodles — 10 to 15 years
Pugs — 12 to 15 years
Rottweilers — 10 to 12 years
Shetland Sheepdogs — 12 to 14 years
Shih Tzu — 11 to 15 years
Yorkshire terrier — 12 to 15 years

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