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  • Moving more slowly
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  • Personality change
  • Reluctant to walk, jump or play
  • Refuses using stairs or the car
  • Change in appetite
  • Change in behavior
  • Muscle atrophy
  • Lagging behind
  • Yelping when touched
  • Limping
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Posts Tagged ‘Dogs Weight’

A Dog’s Lifespan

Monday, April 14th, 2014

A dog’s lifespan varies widely by the type of breed, and also its size. All dog breeds belong to the same species, evolved from the wolf, yet they age at very different rates and no one understands why there is such a variance. Some dog breeds live to be 16 to 20 years old, whereas breeds like the Irish Wolfhound have a life expectancy of only 6 to 8 years.


If you’re considering adopting an adult dog or a puppy, and you’re concerned about the dog’s lifespan, the best advice is – think small.

Around 40% of small breed dogs live longer than 10 years. In contrast, only 13% of giant breed dogs will live that long. The average 50-pound dog has a lifespan of 10 to 12 years, while a giant breed like the Great Dane is considered senior or elderly at 6 to 8 years of age. Dogs that weigh less than 30 pounds live the longest.

In a study involving more than 700 dogs and 77 different breeds, researchers found that a dog’s weight and size are the chief determining factors in a dog’s lifespan. It’s not unusual for a miniature poodle to live for 16 or 17 years, while a 12-year-old Labrador Retriever is considered an old dog. Giant breeds that weigh more than 100 pounds are considered geriatric when they reach 6 to 7 years of age.

A good rule of thumb is the larger the dog, the fewer years it will live. If you want a dog that will live for a long time you may want to consider adopting a mixed breed rather than a purebred, which on the whole usually have shorter lifespans than most mixed breeds.

When deciding between a male or female dog, remember that females tend to live a little longer than males, mimicking the human condition in this respect.

If you’re considering a purebred dog, it’s a good idea to research the types of ailments and diseases specific to the breed before deciding. Many large-breed dogs like Golden Retrievers, German Shepherds and Doberman Pinschers will develop hip dysplasia and the condition can become so serious that the dog will have to be euthanized.

Cancer is a common disease that can significantly shorten a dog’s lifespan, and some breeds like Boxers, Rottweilers, and Golden Retrievers have unusually high rates of cancer. Cancer is the most common cause of death in older dogs and nearly 42% of those dogs die from some form of cancer.

Flat-faced dogs such as Pugs and Shih Tzus, are predisposed to breathing problems that can cause overheating and even death. Cavalier King Charles Spaniels are likely to develop a heart condition called mitral valve disease. Cocker Spaniels are susceptible to recurring ear and eye infections.

Being a responsible pet owner means seeing that your dog has the correct type and amount of nourishment, and proper exercise. Very important for a dog’s lifespan is the prevention of obesity which will help your dog live a longer, healthier life.

The American Kennel Club has published a list of the most popular dog breeds and their average life span:

Beagles — 12 to 14 years
Boston terriers — about 15 years
Boxers — 11 to 14 years
Bulldogs — 10 to 12 years
Chihuahuas — 15 years or more
Dachshunds — 12 to 14 years
Doberman Pinschers — 10 to 12 years
German Shepherd dog — 10 to 14 years
German shorthaired pointers — 12 to 15 years
Golden retriever — 10 to 12 years
Labrador retriever — 10 to 14 years
Miniature Schnauzers — 15 years or more
Pomeranians — 13 to 15 years
Poodles — 10 to 15 years
Pugs — 12 to 15 years
Rottweilers — 10 to 12 years
Shetland Sheepdogs — 12 to 14 years
Shih Tzu — 11 to 15 years
Yorkshire terrier — 12 to 15 years

Weight Loss For Fat Dogs

Monday, December 23rd, 2013

Weight loss for fat dogs seems like a no-brainer. The easiest way to tell if your pet needs to shed a few pounds is to feel around its ribs and spine. You should be able to feel both, with only a thin layer of fat separating the skin from the bones. If you can’t find its ribcage, you definitely have an overweight dog.

Ask your veterinarian to evaluate your dog’s weight at the point when it reaches maturity. As a rule of thumb 15% above the ideal weight is obese, whereas 10% to 15% is considered overweight. If your dog weighs more than it should, don’t be discouraged. In industrialized nations more than 20% of all dogs are overweight or obese.

Keeping track of your dog’s weight can be a relatively easy task. Your vet will weigh your dog every visit and you’ll then be able to determine whether you’re overfeeding your dog or not.

Some breeds of dogs are naturally prone to obesity, while others like Greyhounds and German Shepherds are characteristically slim.

Small and medium size breeds are just as likely to be overweight or obese as are larger dogs. Some of the smaller and medium size dogs with a tendency to put on excess weight are Dachshunds, Scottish Terriers, Cavalier King Charles Spaniels, Beagles, Cocker Spaniels, and Basset Hounds.

Among larger breeds, Labrador Retrievers, Golden Retrievers, and Rottweilers tend to be the most susceptible breeds for weight gain.

Although not as common, giant breeds like the Bernese Mountain Dog, Newfoundlands and Saint Bernards can easily put on extra weight and you may not even notice until the dog becomes obese.

If you are serious about weight loss for your fat dog, you should begin feeding it a daily regimen of Winston’s Digest All to speed up weight loss. Overweight dogs usually lose an average of five pounds within the first two to three months of a daily regimen of Digest All.

Diet for Fat Dogs

Monday, April 15th, 2013

A diet for a fat dog seems like a no-brainer. If a dog is overweight, its owner is simply feeding the dog too much food or too many treats.

It’s important to feed your dog the correct serving amount whether it’s overweight or not. Dog food companies are notorious for putting serving sizes that are too large on their bags of dry dog food. To determine the correct portion to serve your pet, you may want to ask your veterinarian how much and how often your dog should be fed.

Dog food manufacturers are no different than the companies that make human products. Consider shampoos: almost every shampoo has on its label “shampoo, rinse, and shampoo again.” How many people ever bother to shampoo their hair twice when showering or taking a bath? Dog food manufacturers use the same tactic to get you to feed more dog food than your dog needs at mealtime. The end result is exactly what they want you to do – buy more dog food.

If you have a fat dog and it really needs to lose weight, you’ll have to put it on a diet. First, keep track of everything you feed it each day, including treats and snacks.

You don’t have to completely eliminate treats when putting your dog on a diet. Instead choose healthy alternatives like raw vegetables or rice cakes. At the beginning of each day decide how many treats you will give your dog that day and stick to it no matter how much begging it does.

To be successful in establishing a diet for fat dogs requires a reduction of the amount of daily portions you feed your dog. Begin by cutting back the amount of food by 15% to 20%. In approximately six to eight weeks you’ll start seeing results. You can also check with your veterinarian on how to calculate the exact amount of calories your pet needs per day in order to lose weight. The vet will consider your dog’s size, ideal body weight, energy level, and general health.

It’s possible that your overweight dog will whine or cry for more food while on a diet but you need to be firm and not give in by feeding it more than the correct amount. Dogs are very adept at whining if they know the end result is more food or treats.

For assured weight loss in your overweight dog, make Winston’s Digest All the cornerstone of its weight loss program. Overweight dogs usually lose an average of five pounds within the first two to three months when put on a daily regimen of Digest All.

And finally, don’t forget the importance of exercise as a part of a diet for fat dogs. Daily exercise is important in losing weight. 10-15 minutes of activity several times per day will help your dog burn calories and lose that fat.

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