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The #1 source for immediate, long-term relief for dogs suffering from degenerative diseases like hip dysplasia, OCD and arthritis.

We are specialists in the treatment of canine joint disease and its accompanying pain.

Let us help put an end to your dog’s suffering, joint stiffness, pain, immobility, and poor quality of life. Our proven products will help you easily accomplish this without the use of drugs or invasive surgery.

Joint Issues

  • Hip Dysplasia
  • Arthritis
  • Osteochondritis (OCD)
  • Stiffness/Inflammation
  • Ligament Tears
  • Growing Pains
  • Mobility Problems
  • Joint Pain
  • Back/Spinal Problems
  • Hypertrophic Osteodystrophy (HOD)

Symptoms

Is your pet becoming less active, less playful, or desiring shorter walks? The following symptoms could be early signs of OCD, Arthritis or Hip Dysplasia.

  • Moving more slowly
  • Difficulty getting up
  • Weight shift to another leg
  • Personality change
  • Reluctant to walk, jump or play
  • Refuses using stairs or the car
  • Change in appetite
  • Change in behavior
  • Muscle atrophy
  • Lagging behind
  • Yelping when touched
  • Limping
We Can Help!
 

Posts Tagged ‘Dogs Health Problems’

Obese Dog Health Problems

Monday, January 25th, 2016


When a dog is obese it’s more susceptible to developing serious medical conditions because of an elevated glucose level and the extra amount of fat that puts additional pressure on its joints and also on its heart. If you have an overweight or obese dog, you should consider placing it on a slimming diet to prevent possible health problems from occurring.

Obese and overweight dogs are predisposed to getting diabetes because their blood glucose level will continue to increase. The dog’s body will naturally secrete insulin in higher amounts but at some point its body will not be able to cope with the increased amounts of insulin and diabetes will result.

A dog with extra weight is much more likely to develop arthritis at a younger age. Typically a dog will develop arthritis after the age of eight but an obese dog may have joint problems much earlier in life because the extra weight adds stress on the joints which in turn cause pain and swelling.

Extra weight can add pressure on the dog’s ligaments and tendons causing further soreness. The ligaments in the dog’s knees and feet may become injured, causing incapacitation. Weight loss is essential to reduce stress on the dog’s joints, tendons and ligaments. In severe cases the dog will require surgery.

Arthritis is not a treatable condition, but may be managed with supplements like Winston’s Joint System, a combination of three, totally-natural whole food supplements developed by a Naturopathic Doctor for his own dog. There are no side-effects with Winston’s because it’s just good whole food and there are no dosage problems because the body uses only what it needs.

An overweight dog is also susceptible to heart problems and cardiovascular disease. Obesity and excess weight causes the heart to pump more blood to the fat tissues, creating an additional workload on the heart. Over a period of time the heart will become weakened and the walls of the heart chambers may be damaged or the blood vessels may dilate and cause heart problems.

Obese and overweight dogs will usually develop breathing problems also. The lungs may be pressured by fatty tissues surrounding the lungs, preventing the dog from breathing normally. The lungs then become overworked because they are having to provide more oxygen to the fatty tissues.

Obese and overweight dogs can also develop liver disease, because the liver is the first place the body deposits the fat. Excess fat in a dog’s liver causes hepatic lipidosis leading to liver failure.

The health problems of obese and overweight dogs are not limited only to these diseases and ailments. There are many other serious medical conditions that can be avoided if a dog maintains a normal weight through a reduction of calorie intake and daily exercise. A healthy and fit dog will live a longer and happier life.

Hip Dysplasia in Shih Tzus

Monday, November 30th, 2015

Hip Dysplasia in Shih Tzus is not as common as it is in larger breed dogs. However, the sad fact is that all sizes of dogs and many breeds are susceptible to this debilitating disease.

Hip Dysplasia in a Shih Tzu

Shih Tzus

Shih Tzus are lively and energetic little companions, but are low-keyed and easily satisfied.

They like nothing better than to be held, petted, and pampered by their owners, and are perfectly happy sitting on the couch with their owner for hours.

Their personality ranges from arrogance and haughtiness at times, to courageousness and politeness at other times.

A Shih Tzu makes a good family dog and adapts well to both children and adults, but they’re not particularly good with very young children as they can’t be handled roughly or awkwardly and they tend to get snappy when their patience wears thin.

They adapt well to apartment living, and while they don’t require as much exercise as large active dogs, daily walks are necessary.

They do make alert and reliable watchdogs, barking vigorously when anyone comes close to their house.

Shih Tzus require more care than other breeds if their hair is kept long. They need daily brushing and regular haircuts but they shed very little, making them a perfect pet choice for anyone who suffers from allergies.

The Shih Tzu is one of the world’s oldest dog breeds. Chinese paintings from the 6th century A.D. show Shi Tzu-like dogs, and historical records note that they were kept as house pets during the Ming Dynasty.

Shih Tzus have long flowing hair, including a tuft of hair above the nose that gives them their characteristic “chrysanthemum” face.

Their rounded heads have a long beard and moustache, a short muzzle and a black nose. Most Shih Tzus have round, dark, wide-set eyes with hanging ears covered with hair. They are longer than they are tall, and their tail curls over the back.

A healthy Shih Tzu can live as long as 15 years. Common health issues include ear and kidney infections, eye problems, and hip dysplasia.

Hip Dysplasia in Shih Tzus

Hip dysplasia is a genetic disease that primarily affects large and giant breeds of dogs but can also affect medium-sized breeds and occasionally small breeds. It is primarily a disease of purebreds, although it can also occur in mixed breeds.

To understand hip dysplasia in Shih Tzus and the resulting arthritis, you need a basic understanding of how the dog’s hip joint is affected.

The hip joint is comprised of a ball and socket that forms the attachment of the hind leg to the body. The ball portion is the head of the femur and the socket is located on the pelvis.

In a normal hip joint the ball rotates freely within the socket. The bones are shaped to perfectly match each other with the socket surrounding the ball. To strengthen the joint, the two bones are held together by a strong ligament.

The joint capsule, a strong band of connective tissue, circles the two bones to provide added stability.

What a normal hip joint looks like:

normal hip joint

Hip dysplasia is linked to abnormal joint structure and a laxity of the muscles, connective tissue, and ligaments that would normally support the dog’s hip joints.

As the disease progresses, the articular surfaces of the two bones lose contact with each other. This separation of the two bones within the joint causes a drastic change in the size and shape of the articular surfaces.

What an abnormal hip joint looks like:

hip dysplasia joint

Most Shih Tzus who eventually develop hip dysplasia are born with normal hips, but due to their genetic make-up the soft tissues surrounding the joint develop abnormally. This leads to the symptoms associated with hip dysplasia. The disease may affect both hips, or only the right or left hip.

Hip dysplasia in Shih Tzus will cause afflicted dogs to walk or run with an altered gait, similar to a bunny-hop. The dog begins to resist any movement that requires full extension or flexion of the rear legs. It will experience stiffness and pain in the rear legs after exercising and on first rising in the morning. Climbing stairs becomes difficult if not impossible. Some dogs will limp and are less willing to participate in normal daily activities, including walks they formerly enjoyed.

It appears that the amount of calories a dog consumes, especially during its fast-growth period from three to ten months, has the biggest impact on whether or not a dog genetically prone to hip dysplasia will develop the disease.

Obesity can increase the severity of the disease in dogs that are genetically susceptible and the extra weight will intensify the degeneration of a dog’s joints and hips. Dogs who are genetically prone to hip dysplasia and also are overweight, are at a much higher risk of developing hip dysplasia and eventually arthritis.

Exercise can be another risk factor. Dogs genetically susceptible to hip dysplasia may have an increased incidence of the disease if they are over-exercised at a young age. Moderate exercise like running and swimming is best for exercising young dogs.

Treatment

Because hip dysplasia in Shih Tzus is primarily an inherited condition, there are no products that can prevent its development.

Through proper diet, exercise, and a daily regimen of Winston’s Joint System, you can slow, and sometimes halt, the progression of this degenerative joint disease while providing your dog with relief from its pain. Winston’s provides many of the raw materials essential for the synthesis of the joint-lubricating synovial fluid as well as the repair of articular cartilage and connective tissue.

You might also want to consider providing your dog with an orthopedic bed like the Canine Cooler Bed which distributes the dog’s weight evenly and reduces pressure on its joints. The Canine Cooler Bed uses revolutionary SoothSoft Technology to give your dog the very best in comfort, and the fluid-enhanced design offers a dry, cooling effect with superior cushioning and support. It’s perfect for dogs with hip dysplasia or arthritis.

If owners insisted on only purchasing an animal whose parents and grandparents were certified to have good or excellent hips, and if breeders only bred these first-rate animals, then the majority of the problems caused by hip dysplasia would be eliminated.

If you are looking to purchase a Shih Tzu now or in the future, the best way to lessen the possibility of getting a dog that will develop hip dysplasia is to examine the incidence of the disease in the dog’s lineage. If at all possible, try to examine the parents and grandparents as far back as three or four generations.

There are different assumptions on how to prevent the progression of hip dysplasia in Shih Tzus.

Poor nutrition, inadequate or improper exercise, and increased body weight may all contribute to the severity of osteoarthritis after the hip dysplasia has developed. Watching the calories your puppy or young dog consumes and preventing obesity in your dog, allowing only non-stressful types of exercise, and a daily regimen of Winston’s Joint System, are the best things you can do for your dog.

Since 1990, Winston’s Joint System and Winston’s Pain Formula have helped heal over twenty thousand dogs from all over the world. Our staff specializes in hip dysplasia, arthritis and all joint, pain and mobility issues.
 
There is an excellent chance we can help your dog, so please contact us at: www.dogshealth.com or call our toll free number at 888-901-5557.

Why Dogs Vomit Blood

Monday, September 21st, 2015


When a dog vomits blood it is suffering from a condition known as hematemesis. Hematemesis could be a temporary condition or a sign of chronic gastrointestinal illness.

The most common reasons why dogs vomit blood are: (1) a small amount of bright red blood indicating an injury in the mouth or throat, (2) a significant amount of dark, clotted blood indicating a serious gastrointestinal condition.

Some symptoms that may accompany a dog’s vomiting of blood include: rapid weight loss, bloating, excessive thirst (this can also be a symptom of diabetes in a dog), or darkened stools.

There are some acute illnesses a vet will need to test for and exclude before the possibility of a chronic condition can be diagnosed. These include poisoning of the animal, swallowing of a foreign object, parasites in the gastrointestinal tract, or bad reactions to prescribed medications.

There are some serious chronic gastrointestinal illnesses and diseases than can also cause a dog to vomit blood, including kidney disease, tumors, bowel obstructions, or liver disease.

When a dog vomits blood, it should be considered just as serious as if it were a human vomiting blood. A responsible pet owner will call their vet for an emergency visit should their dog begin vomiting blood.

Don’t take a chance that it’s nothing serious or that the problem will go away on its own. Your pet deserves better treatment than that.

Emergency Vet Visit

Monday, October 6th, 2014


Picture this scenario: Your beloved pet has just been hit by a car. Your dog is obviously in great pain and suffering from broken bones, internal bleeding, or both. Your immediate response will be an emergency vet visit.

When your dog is seriously injured and you need to make an emergency trip to the animal hospital, there are some steps you can take to make it less stressful for both you and your dog. An emergency visit is never the same as a regular visit to the vet.

If possible, call the animal hospital before you leave home and let the staff know you are on your way with a seriously injured pet. This will alert the emergency vet and hospital team, giving them time to prepare for immediate treatment upon your arrival, which could possibly make a difference in saving your dog’s life.

As calmly as possible given the seriousness of the situation, describe your dog’s symptoms as carefully as you can. The staff may need to give you some first aid steps to perform before coming to the hospital.

As soon as your dog reaches the animal hospital or emergency pet clinic, the front desk nurse or receptionist will call for “triage.” This term simply means that a team which includes the emergency vet, will examine your dog’s condition and ask questions about your pet and an explanation of what caused the injury. The vet will determine if your pet must be immediately scheduled for surgery or whether its injuries can be treated in one of the examination rooms. You may be asked to sign a release for your dog to be treated.

If surgery is deemed necessary, you’ll be asked to have a seat in the waiting room while your pet is undergoing surgery. Fully staffed animal hospitals will have a technician update you on your dog’s progress as the procedure progresses.

When your pet’s surgery has been completed, a member of the emergency veterinary team will discuss your dog’s prognosis, any at-home care required, and when a follow up appointment is needed. The vet may recommend that you leave your pet in the hospital overnight, or possibly for a few days for further observation.

If your pet is hospitalized, you will usually be allowed to personally check on your dog’s progress during regular animal hospital visiting hours. A competent and caring staff may also call to keep you updated on your pet’s recovery and progress.

When it comes time to bring your dog home, the hospital staff will give you detailed instructions for continued at-home care, including any medications the vet has prescribed.

When an emergency vet visit is necessary to save the life of your seriously injured dog, it helps to know what your responsibilities will be in order to help your injured pet receive the appropriate care it needs as quickly as possible.

Classic Tails Vol. 1 – “For Whom The Bell Tolls”

Tuesday, October 12th, 2010


Classic Tails Vol. 1 – “For Whom The Bell Tolls” has been revised for dog lovers.

“For Whom The Bell Tolls” is a good war action story written by a human named Ernest Hemingway. In this superb novel, an American dog joins a band of armed gypsies fighting in the Spanish Civil War. He sincerely believes that one dog can make a difference in the war. The dog is soon given the task of finding a way to blow up a key bridge situated behind enemy lines. No small job for someone with no opposable thumbs. But he doesn’t let a small thing like that stop him from his appointed duty.

As this heroic epic unfolds, he also falls in love with Maria, a beautiful Spanish-bred female dog fond of wearing bright red flamenco skirts.

The book opens with our hero dog lying on the “pine-needled floor of the forest” and closes as he feels his heart pounding against the “pine needle floor of the forest”; he ends as he begins. While lying amidst the pine needles, he keeps wishing he had some Winston’s Digest All to alleviate the gas, bloating, and flatulence he was experiencing from the nasty meal he’d been served by some guy claiming to be the cook.

Three crucial days in the dog’s life force him to question his own role in a pointless war. He wonders if dying for a political cause might be a waste of life (it certainly would be a waste of MY life!), but he ultimately believes that dying to save another dog is the most heroic act a hero can perform.

The book’s title is taken from John Donne’s celebrated poem: “No man is an Island … and therefore never send to know for whom the bell tolls; It tolls for thee.” It is about the integrated fabric of all life: What happens to one dog happens to all.

“For Whom the Bell Tolls” has also been regarded as Hemingway’s submission to critics who barked that his writing style was too spare. But Hollywood loved the book and the hero dog subsequently became an even more popular canine hero on the big screen.

“For Whom the Bell Tolls” ranks as one of the great American war novels of all time. If Hemingway were still alive I am sure he would be more than pleased to write a novel starring me, Wotan, as the invincible hero of a novel.

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