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Posts Tagged ‘Dog Vaccines’

Dog Vaccination Costs

Monday, February 1st, 2016


Whether you have a new puppy to care for or an older dog that needs regular shots, dog vaccination costs are an important consideration in today’s economy. Vaccinations are essential to preventing a wide array of health problems, diseases and other harmful or fatal conditions that can affect a dog.

Veterinarians usually recommend beginning vaccinations for a puppy when it’s just a few weeks old, and some vaccinations have to be renewed every so often in order for them to be effective.

Vaccinations are commonly given against several different diseases, including distemper, parvovirus, and rabies. Your dog’s vaccination schedule will depend on factors such as where you live and your dog’s exposure to other dogs or animals.

Parvovirus is contagious and often fatal for most puppies. But if your puppy or dog doesn’t come into contact with other dogs, this vaccine may not be needed.

The best way to determine a dog’s vaccination costs long-term is to research the types of vaccinations that are vital to your dog’s health based on its age, breed, gender and where you live.

Most dog vaccinations cost around $20 each; additional booster shots add to the total costs. You also have to figure in the cost of a visit for the vet to administer the vaccines. You’ll probably be charged an additional $40 to $50 for the vet’s office visit.

Dog vaccination costs often vary considerably depending on what part of the country you live in and whether you live in an urban or suburban area rather than rural.

If you do not already have a regular veterinarian it would be wise to call different veterinarian’s offices and ask what the charges will be for an office visit and the dog vaccinations your pet requires.

Skin Lumps and Bumps in Dogs

Monday, May 25th, 2015


It’s not unusual to find skin lumps and bumps on your dog at some point in its lifetime. Lumps can appear either on or just under a dog’s skin.

It is important to have these lumps checked by your veterinarian, especially if the lumps are new, bleeding, oozing or rapidly increasing in size. Many lumps and bumps under a dog’s skin are harmless, but others may be malignant or may become malignant.

Skin tumors are among the most common tumors in dogs. Fortunately, many of these tumors are benign and not a cause for worry. The lump may be simply a pimple or an allergic reaction to an insect bite. Sometimes these skin masses are malignant and require prompt medical attention, so it would be wise to have your dog examined by a veterinarian to assess any skin bumps that you detect on your dog.

The options for treating skin tumors depend entirely upon the cause of the tumor. For example, benign fatty masses rarely require removal unless they bother the dog owner.

Most veterinarians recommend that malignant skin masses be removed as soon as possible. The tissue removed during the operation is sent to a pathology laboratory to determine whether all of the tumor cells associated with the mass have been removed. X-rays may be taken to determine whether cancerous cells have spread to nearby lymph nodes or other areas like the bone marrow or lungs. Blood tests are done to evaluate the dog’s overall health and response to any proposed treatments.

Sometimes radiation or chemotherapy treatments (or both) will be used in addition to surgical removal of the mass in order to improve the chances of a dog’s full recovery.

Tumors can recur after surgery so regular checkups are important if the dog had a malignant skin tumor removed or treated.

Skin lumps and bumps on your dog could be any one of these types:

(1) Hematoma which is a collection of clotted blood beneath the skin;

(2) Basal cell tumor in the form of a nodule on a narrow base or stalk. It will be round, normally hairless, and may be ulcerated. These tumors are usually found on the head, neck, and shoulders of older dogs;

(3) Lipoma which is a soft round or oblong growth underneath the skin;

(4) Ceruminous gland adenoma. This is a pinkish-white dome-shaped growth in the ear canal that may become ulcerated and infected;

(5) Epidermal inclusion cyst recognizable as a firm lump beneath a dog’s skin. These cysts sometimes discharge cheese-like material and become infected;

(6) Histiocytoma is a button-like fast-growing mass that may appear anywhere on a dog’s body;

(7) Melanoma is a brown or black pigmented nodule that appears in areas of dark skin. If melanomas grow in the mouth of a dog, they are usually malignant;

(8) Skin papillomas grow out from the skin and may look like a wart. These are not painful or dangerous;

(9) Squamous cell carcinoma is a gray or reddish-looking ulcer found on the belly, scrotum, feet, legs, lips, or nose that doesn’t heal. It sometimes looks like a cauliflower.

If you find any skin lumps or bumps on your dog that resemble one or more of the above descriptions, you should contact your vet to schedule an examination.

Should You Adopt a Rescued Dog

Monday, April 27th, 2015


Too many people feel that if you adopt a rescued dog you’re just settling for a pet no one else wanted. You might think there must be something wrong with the dog or it wouldn’t be in a shelter. Or maybe you feel that if you can adopt a cute little puppy, why would you want to take someone else’s “used” dog?

Not all dogs in animal shelters or dog rescue organizations are animals that nobody wanted. A more common scenario is that the dog had a loving home and was well cared for by its owner but ran away or was picked up by an animal control officer and the dog had no ID tag to identify its owner.

Another reason a good dog can end up in a shelter is because its owner was no longer able to care for it due to illness or death, and sometimes due to financial hardship. Some wonderful dogs are surrendered to a shelter by their owners simply because there is a new baby in the family and the owners are afraid of keeping the dog in the same house as a newborn. If you spend some time visiting an animal shelter you will hear many heartbreaking stories about adorable and devoted dogs being given up by their owners for many different reasons.

It’s also true that some dogs are surrendered to shelters because their owners could not afford the medical costs to treat a curable disease the dog has developed, or in some cases they were just disappointed that the dog was not behaving exactly as they expected it to.

A rescued dog may have survived anything from mistreatment to sheer cruelty and it deserves a new life in a home where it will be loved and properly cared for. Rescue means to “save something from a dangerous or harmful situation or to prevent something from being discarded or rejected.” Whatever the reason a dog ends up in a shelter, it has in some way been discarded or rejected.

There are many advantages if you adopt a rescued dog. The previous owner may have had the dog vaccinated already which saves you money. There’s a good chance that most of the dog’s basic training may have been completed, making it much easier to acclimate a new dog to your home and lifestyle. Rescued dogs usually make perfect pets and companions as they are so happy to be out of the confines of a shelter and find someone new to be devoted to.

Today’s society is a disposable one. Everything we buy seems to be disposable at some point in its existence. If so much of what a person owns is deemed to be disposable, why not a pet that’s no longer needed? Unfortunately this way of thinking is more common than most people realize. When you adopt a rescued dog you’re really adopting something previously thought of as disposable, and making it useful again.

All dogs, and especially rescued dogs, deserve another chance to be man’s best friend and indispensable companion. When you adopt a rescued dog it will love you for its entire lifetime.

Dog Vaccines

Monday, February 23rd, 2015


The list of vaccines to prevent common dog viruses contains only seven vaccines. Each of these vaccines can be used to protect against one or more viruses that can affect a dog.

Vaccines contain a viral or bacterial agent that is added to a liquid and then given to a dog through ingestion, inhalation or injection. This causes a dog’s immune system to create antibodies to a specific illness and will protect the dog from infection if exposed to that virus.

Each of the vaccines listed below refers to the level and type of the virus or bacteria in the vaccine, and the level and type of protection a dog will acquire after receiving the vaccine.

1. Monovalent Vaccines
Monovalent vaccines provide protection for one disease at a time. An example of this is the Rabies vaccine. This vaccine contains only the rabies viral agent added to the liquid.

2. Multivalent Vaccines
Multivalent vaccines contain several bacterial or viral agents that have been added to the liquid the dog will ingest. As many as 8 or 9 disease agents can be combined into one Multivalent vaccine. A common vaccine called Duramune is known as a “core vaccine” and protects against four of the most common dog viruses.

3. Recombinant Vaccines
Certain antigens on infectious organisms stimulate a greater antibody response in a dog. In a Recombinant vaccine the genes of the virus are fragmented into separate parts and the parts that will produce the best immune response are isolated and used in the vaccine.

4. Injectable Vaccines
Injectable vaccines are injected into a dog’s muscle or under the skin. When injected in the dog’s muscle it is referred to as an intramuscular vaccine and if injected under the skin it is called a subcutaneous vaccine. Some vaccines can be injected using either method but some such as the rabies vaccine must be injected intramuscularly.

5. Modified Live Vaccines (MLV)
In Modified Live Vaccines, live virus particles are altered in a laboratory to keep the virus alive but kill its ability to produce the disease. When introduced to the dog’s body, the viral agents reproduce and trigger an immune response without causing an outbreak of the infection. MLV vaccines stimulate a dog’s antibodies more quickly and in larger amounts.

6. Killed Vaccines
In a Killed vaccine, the actual viruses or bacteria are killed and then placed in a liquid solution. The viruses or bacteria are then not able to multiply within a dog’s body. More of the virus or bacteria particles are introduced in an attempt to trigger an immune response. There is one disadvantage to this type of vaccine and that is it can put a dog at an increased risk of developing an allergic response.

7. Intranasal Vaccines
Intranasal vaccines are designed to protect against diseases of a dog’s respiratory system. They are processed into a liquid to squirt or drop into a dog’s nose. The vaccine is transmitted directly into the dog’s bloodstream and provides protection more quickly than an injectable vaccine can.

It is important that you consult your veterinarian to determine which vaccines are appropriate for your pet and when they should be administered.

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