Our Blog
The #1 source for immediate, long-term relief for dogs suffering from degenerative diseases like hip dysplasia, OCD and arthritis.

We are specialists in the treatment of canine joint disease and its accompanying pain.

Let us help put an end to your dog’s suffering, joint stiffness, pain, immobility, and poor quality of life. Our proven products will help you easily accomplish this without the use of drugs or invasive surgery.

Joint Issues

  • Hip Dysplasia
  • Arthritis
  • Osteochondritis (OCD)
  • Stiffness/Inflammation
  • Ligament Tears
  • Growing Pains
  • Mobility Problems
  • Joint Pain
  • Back/Spinal Problems
  • Hypertrophic Osteodystrophy (HOD)

Symptoms

Is your pet becoming less active, less playful, or desiring shorter walks? The following symptoms could be early signs of OCD, Arthritis or Hip Dysplasia.

  • Moving more slowly
  • Difficulty getting up
  • Weight shift to another leg
  • Personality change
  • Reluctant to walk, jump or play
  • Refuses using stairs or the car
  • Change in appetite
  • Change in behavior
  • Muscle atrophy
  • Lagging behind
  • Yelping when touched
  • Limping
We Can Help!
 

Posts Tagged ‘Dog medicines’

Dogs With Upset Stomachs

Monday, April 25th, 2016


When a dog is suffering with an upset stomach it can be a miserable time for both the dog and its owner.

When dogs have upset stomachs accompanied by vomiting and diarrhea, it’s unpleasant for the dog’s owner, but worse for the dog. Vomiting, diarrhea and abdominal pain are unsettling to a pet and the sooner these problems are resolved, the better off the dog will be. A direct result of persistent vomiting or diarrhea is dehydration, so it’s very important to be sure your dog stays well hydrated when sick.

Some of the options for treating an upset stomach include home remedies, over-the-counter medications and prescription medications. The specific remedy needed to help a dog depends on the severity of the stomach upset and which symptoms it is experiencing.

Step one in treating a dog with an upset stomach is to identify the cause for the onset of the stomach problems. Upset stomach problems in dogs most commonly occur as the result of bacterial or viral infections or ingestion of foreign matter.

It’s not always possible to isolate the exact cause of upset stomach problems in dogs because it’s too easy for a dog to swallow something without your knowledge, resulting in the upset. However, if you can find out what caused the upset stomach, you’ll have a better chance of choosing the right remedy for effective treatment.

If you’re like most dog owners, you may want to try a home remedy before buying an over-the-counter medication. Most over-the-counter medications are safe for dogs, but you may want to call your veterinarian before giving your pet an antidiarrheal medication like Pepto-Bismol or Kaopectate. Both of these products can be safely given to dogs to alleviate diarrhea symptoms.

Mild diarrhea and vomiting are signs of gastrointestinal upset, and in order to alleviate the symptoms of the upset, the dog’s digestive system needs a chance to relax and recuperate. If the upset is due to a bacterial infection a continuous supply of fresh water will give the dog’s body a chance to eliminate the harmful bacteria.

When your dog is ready to eat again you should serve it only stomach-friendly foods so you don’t further irritate its digestive system. Some of the healthy things to feed your dog at this time are chicken, ground beef, rice, eggs, and bread (lightly toasted is fine if your dog prefers it that way).
Cottage cheese is also an excellent choice because it contains a high content of good bacteria which helps clear the dog’s system of harmful bacteria.

If your dog’s upset stomach problems persist you should schedule an appointment with your veterinarian so more appropriate treatment can be started.

Some of the prescription dog remedies that are available include:
* Metoclopramide – for the treatment of nausea and vomiting;
* Cimetidine – for control of gastrointestinal inflammation;
* Metronidazole – an antimicrobial antibiotic for treating diarrhea caused by bacterial infection;
* Sucralfate – an antiulcer medication that helps neutralize stomach acid;
* Centrine Tabs – used to treat gastrointestinal inflammation when accompanied by nausea, vomiting and diarrhea.

Elbow Dysplasia in Dogs

Monday, February 29th, 2016

Elbow dysplasia in dogs is a painful degenerative condition that affects popular breeds of large dogs like Golden Retrievers, German Shepherds, Rottweilers, and Great Danes.

Elbow Dysplasia in Dogs

What is elbow dysplasia

Elbow dysplasia is caused by an abnormality that forms in a puppy’s elbow joint and affects proper development of the elbow. Elbow dysplasia is genetic and usually reveals itself in the early stages of a dog’s life, often as early as six months of age. Because elbow dysplasia is a genetic disease, veterinarians are still unsure of what causes it.

The ailment occurs when a piece of bone or cartilage breaks and interferes with the development of a proper joint structure in the dog’s elbow, causing a great amount of pain in the elbow joint.

Fortunately there are treatments that can help correct and lessen the discomfort for a dog with this disease.

Signs of elbow dysplasia in dogs

The first signs of elbow dysplasia display themselves by a dog limping or avoiding any pressure on the affected leg. If both elbows develop dysplasia, a dog will have great difficulty standing up or walking.

Early recognition of the first signs of elbow dysplasia can prevent further damage to the developing elbow joint if the dog is put under the care of a veterinarian. If the condition is allowed to worsen it will cause greater pain and discomfort as the dog begins to get older.

Treatment options of elbow dysplasia in dogs

The most common treatments for a dog with elbow dysplasia are medical or aerobic rather than surgery.

• A special diet may be recommended to help maintain a lower weight, thereby relieving excessive pressure on the joints.

• A vet may also instruct you to limit the dog’s exercise to help correct the abnormality through regular movement while keeping the level of injury low.

Pain medications and anti-inflammatory drugs are usually prescribed when the pain is severe.

• Although surgery is not as commonly recommended, it can help. The affected bone or cartilage is removed and the veterinary surgeon will use pins and screws to re-attach the bones that did not grow together correctly.

Almost all treatments prescribed for elbow dysplasia in dogs will help the animal live a normal life after approximately one or two years of treatment, at which point the dog usually shows no signs of the condition.

Since 1990, Winston’s Joint System and Winston’s Pain Formula have helped heal over twenty thousand dogs from all over the world. Our staff specializes in hip dysplasia, arthritis and all joint, pain and mobility issues.
 
There is an excellent chance we can help your dog, so please contact us at: www.dogshealth.com or call our toll free number at 888-901-5557.

Dog Vaccination Costs

Monday, February 1st, 2016


Whether you have a new puppy to care for or an older dog that needs regular shots, dog vaccination costs are an important consideration in today’s economy. Vaccinations are essential to preventing a wide array of health problems, diseases and other harmful or fatal conditions that can affect a dog.

Veterinarians usually recommend beginning vaccinations for a puppy when it’s just a few weeks old, and some vaccinations have to be renewed every so often in order for them to be effective.

Vaccinations are commonly given against several different diseases, including distemper, parvovirus, and rabies. Your dog’s vaccination schedule will depend on factors such as where you live and your dog’s exposure to other dogs or animals.

Parvovirus is contagious and often fatal for most puppies. But if your puppy or dog doesn’t come into contact with other dogs, this vaccine may not be needed.

The best way to determine a dog’s vaccination costs long-term is to research the types of vaccinations that are vital to your dog’s health based on its age, breed, gender and where you live.

Most dog vaccinations cost around $20 each; additional booster shots add to the total costs. You also have to figure in the cost of a visit for the vet to administer the vaccines. You’ll probably be charged an additional $40 to $50 for the vet’s office visit.

Dog vaccination costs often vary considerably depending on what part of the country you live in and whether you live in an urban or suburban area rather than rural.

If you do not already have a regular veterinarian it would be wise to call different veterinarian’s offices and ask what the charges will be for an office visit and the dog vaccinations your pet requires.

Is Your Dog Panting Too Much?

Monday, January 18th, 2016


Ordinary panting enables a dog to release heat from its body as dogs are not like humans who able to release heat through their sweat glands. But if your dog continues to pant too much for longer than a day, it could be a sign of sickness, heat stroke or even undue stress.

All dogs vary in how much they pant during and after exercising. If your dog has been exercising in the heat of day and continues to pant heavily for longer than 10 minutes after exercising, you should immediately contact your veterinarian. Your dog could be suffering from heat stroke which often follows a long workout or heavy exercise in hot weather.

Heat stroke can cause excessive drooling, vomiting, lethargy, dizziness, and occasionally a seizure. A dog may appear to be panting too much if it’s suffering from heat stroke. If you suspect heat stroke, give your dog plenty of water. Spray or splash cool water on the dog’s feet, stomach, and face but don’t use ice water as this can cause the dog to go into shock.

Dogs pant heavily when they’re stressed, anxious, or afraid and this bears no relationship to a dog’s hyperactivity level. If your dog is afraid of noises, begin desensitizing it to any noises that seem to be disturbing it. First expose the dog to the noises at a very low level, rewarding with treats each time it remains calm. Gradually begin making the noises progressively louder until the dog no longer responds distressingly to the noise.

Obesity can also cause a dog to pant too much. Overweight dogs have a harder time breathing, just as an overweight adult human does. If weight gain is a problem for your dog you should cut down on the amount of food you feed the dog each day.

If your dog is panting too much it’s best to assume the cause is serious and proceed from that premise. Hopefully the panting is a minor problem that clears itself up in a short period of time.

Skin Lumps and Bumps in Dogs

Monday, May 25th, 2015


It’s not unusual to find skin lumps and bumps on your dog at some point in its lifetime. Lumps can appear either on or just under a dog’s skin.

It is important to have these lumps checked by your veterinarian, especially if the lumps are new, bleeding, oozing or rapidly increasing in size. Many lumps and bumps under a dog’s skin are harmless, but others may be malignant or may become malignant.

Skin tumors are among the most common tumors in dogs. Fortunately, many of these tumors are benign and not a cause for worry. The lump may be simply a pimple or an allergic reaction to an insect bite. Sometimes these skin masses are malignant and require prompt medical attention, so it would be wise to have your dog examined by a veterinarian to assess any skin bumps that you detect on your dog.

The options for treating skin tumors depend entirely upon the cause of the tumor. For example, benign fatty masses rarely require removal unless they bother the dog owner.

Most veterinarians recommend that malignant skin masses be removed as soon as possible. The tissue removed during the operation is sent to a pathology laboratory to determine whether all of the tumor cells associated with the mass have been removed. X-rays may be taken to determine whether cancerous cells have spread to nearby lymph nodes or other areas like the bone marrow or lungs. Blood tests are done to evaluate the dog’s overall health and response to any proposed treatments.

Sometimes radiation or chemotherapy treatments (or both) will be used in addition to surgical removal of the mass in order to improve the chances of a dog’s full recovery.

Tumors can recur after surgery so regular checkups are important if the dog had a malignant skin tumor removed or treated.

Skin lumps and bumps on your dog could be any one of these types:

(1) Hematoma which is a collection of clotted blood beneath the skin;

(2) Basal cell tumor in the form of a nodule on a narrow base or stalk. It will be round, normally hairless, and may be ulcerated. These tumors are usually found on the head, neck, and shoulders of older dogs;

(3) Lipoma which is a soft round or oblong growth underneath the skin;

(4) Ceruminous gland adenoma. This is a pinkish-white dome-shaped growth in the ear canal that may become ulcerated and infected;

(5) Epidermal inclusion cyst recognizable as a firm lump beneath a dog’s skin. These cysts sometimes discharge cheese-like material and become infected;

(6) Histiocytoma is a button-like fast-growing mass that may appear anywhere on a dog’s body;

(7) Melanoma is a brown or black pigmented nodule that appears in areas of dark skin. If melanomas grow in the mouth of a dog, they are usually malignant;

(8) Skin papillomas grow out from the skin and may look like a wart. These are not painful or dangerous;

(9) Squamous cell carcinoma is a gray or reddish-looking ulcer found on the belly, scrotum, feet, legs, lips, or nose that doesn’t heal. It sometimes looks like a cauliflower.

If you find any skin lumps or bumps on your dog that resemble one or more of the above descriptions, you should contact your vet to schedule an examination.

© 2010-2018 DogsHealth.Com