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The #1 source for immediate, long-term relief for dogs suffering from degenerative diseases like hip dysplasia, OCD and arthritis.

We are specialists in the treatment of canine joint disease and its accompanying pain.

Let us help put an end to your dog’s suffering, joint stiffness, pain, immobility, and poor quality of life. Our proven products will help you easily accomplish this without the use of drugs or invasive surgery.

Joint Issues

  • Hip Dysplasia
  • Arthritis
  • Osteochondritis (OCD)
  • Stiffness/Inflammation
  • Ligament Tears
  • Growing Pains
  • Mobility Problems
  • Joint Pain
  • Back/Spinal Problems
  • Hypertrophic Osteodystrophy (HOD)

Symptoms

Is your pet becoming less active, less playful, or desiring shorter walks? The following symptoms could be early signs of OCD, Arthritis or Hip Dysplasia.

  • Moving more slowly
  • Difficulty getting up
  • Weight shift to another leg
  • Personality change
  • Reluctant to walk, jump or play
  • Refuses using stairs or the car
  • Change in appetite
  • Change in behavior
  • Muscle atrophy
  • Lagging behind
  • Yelping when touched
  • Limping
We Can Help!
 

Posts Tagged ‘Dog Diabetes’

Older Dogs Health Problems

Monday, February 24th, 2014

Older dogs health problems can start occurring as soon as a dog is eight to ten years old, depending upon the breed of the animal. The most common health issues in older dogs include arthritis, heart disease, dental problems, and diabetes.

Arthritis is one of the most common medical conditions that affects older dogs. About one in every five pet dogs will develop some form of arthritis during its lifetime. And like arthritis in humans, arthritis in dogs cannot be cured. The good news is that arthritis in dogs is not inevitably hopeless. There are effective treatments on the market today that can help ease your dog’s symptoms, allowing your pet to live a longer, active life.

There are several causes for arthritis in dogs. The condition can be genetic, as is the case with hip dysplasia, and it can also develop as the result of an infection or an immune disorder that affects the dog’s joints.

Symptoms of arthritis in dogs include: weight gain not caused by excessive overeating, sleeping much more than usual, a decreased interest in playing or going on walks, favoring one leg more than the others, hesitancy climbing or going down stairs, acting less alert, having a lot of difficulty standing, and appearing to suffer from pain in the joints.

If the arthritis is not severe and advanced to the point that your dog cannot walk at all without the aid of braces or a wheelchair, the best thing you can do for your pet is to put it on a daily regimen of Winston’s Joint System, an all-natural formula developed by a Naturopathic Doctor to heal his own dog. For over 20 years this proven formula has been bringing relief from pain and stiffness to all breeds and ages of dogs.

Older dogs are very susceptible to the development of heart disease, including heart attacks, strokes, and congestive heart failure. Serious heart problems occur more frequently in overweight dogs. An older dog’s diet needs to be low in carbohydrates and fats, and it needs a moderate exercise program so it will be less likely to develop a heart condition.

After a dog reaches the age of 3 or 4 it will often develop dental problems. This happens when a dog doesn’t receive proper dental hygiene during its younger years. Adding kibble to a dog’s canned food diet will help keep its teeth and gums healthy. The slight tooth abrasion offered by dry dog food cannot be achieved when a dog eats a diet consisting solely of soft or wet food.

Plaque deposits on a dog’s teeth can easily turn into tartar which can’t be removed by simple brushing. Tartar buildup is the beginning of gum and periodontal disease. A dog with periodontal disease is susceptible to other internal health problems because bacteria can easily enter the dog’s system through its receding gums. Some dog chew treats have abrasive surfaces that help remove plaque deposits and keep a dog’s teeth healthy.

Some older dogs’ health problems include a lack of control over their bladder and they will urinate in the house. In addition to being caused by aging, urinating (or defecating) in the house may also be an indication of a urinary infection or some other medical condition like colitis, hormonal imbalance, kidney problems or diabetes.

Older dogs are more susceptible to developing diabetes, especially a dog that is obese. Diabetes is caused by an increased level of glucose in the blood that the body is unable to properly assimilate. A dog may need insulin shots or other prescription medicine to manage the diabetes.

Older dogs can also have hearing or vision problems just as older humans often do. If you are responsible for an older dog you need to be aware of the serious problems that can affect a dog’s health simply because it has grown old.

Why Dogs Sleep So Much

Monday, October 28th, 2013

If you’re concerned that your pet dog may be sleeping too much and there might be something wrong with it, you’ll first need to determine whether it really is sleeping more than what’s normal for its age and activity level.

Why Dogs Sleep So Much

Why dogs sleep so much

Why dogs sleep so much is a common question new dog owners often ask their friends who’ve had dogs for some time.

Dogs sleep more than humans do, but they also wake up more frequently than we do. How much they sleep depends a lot upon their level of activity.

A dog living in a home as a pet will sleep more than a dog that works for a living – like a search and rescue dog, or a dog working on a ranch or farm. Dogs are able to adjust their sleep pattern so that they can be awake when there’s something to do, and can easily sleep the rest of the time.

Many indoor dogs will sometimes sleep out of simple boredom. If you suspect your dog is bored, you can give it ample stimulation during the day by giving it lots of toys to play with or take it on several walks. If your dog has enough to do during the day, it will usually stay awake during the day and then sleep at night when you do.

Sleep patterns

Dogs have the same sleep patterns as humans.

When your dog first goes to sleep, it enters the slow wave or quiet phase of sleep. It will lie quite still and is oblivious to its surroundings. The breathing slows, the blood pressure and body temperature drop, and the heart rate decreases.

After about ten minutes, your dog enters the rapid eye movement (REM) or active stage of sleep. Its eyes will roll under its closed lids, and it may bark or whine or jerk its legs. During this stage, the brain activity is similar to that seen during the dreaming phase of human sleep, and many vets and pet owners agree that this is evidence that dogs have dreams.

Adult dogs spend about 10 to 12 percent of their sleeping time in REM sleep. Puppies spend a greater proportion of their sleep time in REM.

Larger dogs sleep so much more than smaller ones who generally have a tendency to always be alert for anything that allows them to start a round of loud and seemingly uncontrollable barking.

Older senior dogs always sleep more than younger dogs, and 20 hours or more a day of sleeping does not mean an old dog is ill; they’re just tired out.

Medical conditions causing dogs to sleep too much

Although all dogs begin to slow down and rest more as they grow older, there are some medical conditions that may cause your dog to sleep too much.

• Many veterinarians believe that dogs can get depressed just as humans can. Canine depression can be the result of a chemical imbalance in the brain but more often is caused by a sudden change in the dog’s routine, such as moving to a new home, being adopted, or losing a long-time companion – human or animal. The primary symptoms of canine depression are an increased amount of time spent sleeping, decreased activity, lethargy, decreased appetite and weight loss.

• When a dog has hypothyroidism, the thyroid gland doesn’t produce enough T3 and T4 hormones, causing a decrease in metabolic function. Most of the time this is an autoimmune response that attacks the thyroid, but it can also be caused by other conditions, such as cancer. The decrease in metabolic function causes the whole body to slow down resulting in excess sleepiness and lethargy. Other symptoms may include weight gain, anemia, hair loss, skin and coat disorders, decreased heart rate, and an intolerance to cold weather.

Juvenile-onset diabetes occurs infrequently in dogs and principally affects older dogs, particularly females. Dogs who have diabetes display symptoms including sleepiness, lethargy, increased thirst, frequent urination, weight loss, and occasional blindness. Treatment is the same as for humans with diabetes: insulin injections. Some breeds such as schnauzers, small terriers, and poodles are at increased risk for diabetes, as are obese dogs.

• There are many infectious diseases that can cause your dog to sleep so much or act lethargic. These diseases include rabies, distemper, parvovirus, Rocky Mountain spotted fever and Lyme disease. Most infectious diseases that cause lethargy and sleepiness are accompanied by a variety of other symptoms that are often more easy to diagnose.

Since 1990, Winston’s Joint System and Winston’s Pain Formula have helped heal over twenty thousand dogs from all over the world. Our staff specializes in hip dysplasia, arthritis and all joint, pain and mobility issues.
 
There is an excellent chance we can help your dog, so please contact us at: www.dogshealth.com or call our toll free number at 888-901-5557.

Vet Care For Older Dogs

Monday, January 7th, 2013


Regular professional vet care for older dogs is essential to their health. Preventive veterinary care can add years to the life of your dog and help keep it happy and healthy for as long as possible.

Because many of our pets are living longer, the earlier the diagnosis of a disease can be made and treatment started, the better the outcome. Many animal clinics and hospitals have also developed special preventive care programs for older animals. Treatments can include combinations of various diagnostic tests including blood tests, urinalysis, x-rays, and EKGs. Your veterinarian can tell you which tests are pertinent for your dog.

Your dog’s life-long health is partially determined by the health of its father and mother on the day it was conceived. Vaccinations, nutrition, dental care, heartworm prevention, and other treatments your dog has received throughout its life have a direct impact on its current health. The healthier a dog is when young, the more likely it will stay healthy as it grows older.

Weight management and diet
Your dog should be weighed at every visit to your vet. Unusual weight gain which can lead to obesity is one of the most common and preventable diseases in older dogs. And an unexplained weight loss may be the first sign of a disease. Your vet can recommend which foods and supplements your dog should be fed based upon his weight, health, and breed. The digestive systems of older dogs do not handle sudden changes in diet very well. If your vet recommends an adjustment in diet, make any changes slowly over the course of a week or longer, gradually replacing the old diet with the new one your vet has recommended.

Medical and behavior history
One of the main ways your vet will use to determine if your dog has contracted a disease is through the use of an accurate medical history. For this reason it is important to monitor your dog and keep accurate records of any sign of disease and unusual changes in behavior . Your vet will ask questions such as ”When did this symptom first appear?”, ”Is it getting better or worse?”, and ”Is the dog demonstrating the symptom at all times or intermittently?”. These are questions that only you will be able to answer. If you are not sure whether certain behaviors or observations are indicative of a disease, be sure to mention them to your veterinarian.

Physical exam
Older dogs should receive regular physical exams. How often these exams should be scheduled depends upon the health of your dog. At the very least, your dog should have an annual physical. For some older dogs, two or more exams a year may be indicated. A physical exam should include an examination of the mouth, teeth, gums, tongue, and throat. A rectal exam is also an important part of a physical exam for an older dog. Your vet will examine the inner pelvic area, internal lymph nodes, the lining of the colon, and in the male dog, his prostate gland.

Ophthalmic exams
As dogs grow older, eye exams are also recommended. Older dogs are more at risk of developing cataracts, glaucoma, and ”dry eye,” a condition in which there is insufficient tear production. Ophthalmic exams will help identify these problems and may prevent permanent damage to the eye.

Vaccinations
Because the immune system of an older dog may not function as well as it did during the dog”s younger years, it’s important to keep your dog up-to-date on all vaccinations. Ask your vet which vaccines your dog should receive, and how often.

Urinalysis
Many veterinarians will recommend a urinalysis for older dogs. A urinalysis encompasses a series of tests which provide an abundance of information for the vet in determining a dog’s health. A urine sample is usually easy to obtain, and the test results are quickly available to the vet. If you notice any changes in the color, odor, or amount of your dog”s urine, or any difficulty urinating, it is important that a urinalysis be performed.

Blood count
There are many blood tests that can be performed on your pet. The specific tests needed will be recommended by your veterinarian. In addition, a chemistry panel may be run to evaluate the various chemicals, enzymes, proteins, hormones, waste products, and electrolytes in your dog’s blood. The chemistry panel is a valuable tool in identifying diabetes, liver disease, kidney disease, and several hormonal diseases.

Thyroid testing
Thyroid testing may also be recommended by your veterinarian, based upon the results of the physical exam, the breed of your dog, and any signs of thyroid hormone deficiency or excess. Dogs who need to take thyroid medication will need to have their thyroid hormone levels checked at regular intervals.

X-Rays
If your dog has a history of heart, lung, kidney, liver, or gastrointestinal disease, x-rays may be recommended. As a dog grows older, it is helpful to have available an x-ray of the chest and abdomen taken at an earlier date while the dog was in prime health. If the dog later develops signs of disease, these ”normal” x-rays are valuable in providing a baseline by which to evaluate the x-rays taken after a disease process has started. In most cases, a dog who has or has had cancer will have x-rays taken, especially of the chest, to look for any spread of the disease.

Vet care for older dogs is far more important that it is for puppies or young adult dogs. Older dogs need regular veterinary care to prevent disease or diagnose it at its earliest stage. Many veterinarians have special programs to monitor dogs in their later years of life and can institute changes to keep your dog healthy and make his senior years a wonderful time of life.

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