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Posts Tagged ‘Best Dog Foods’

Healthy Dog Food Ingredients

Monday, June 15th, 2015


It is an axiom (a generally accepted idea or proposition assumed to be true) that using healthy dog food ingredients will result in healthy dog foods. It is also true that feeding dogs healthy food enhances their quality of life by reducing illnesses, improving the coat and teeth, and providing healthy energy for their bodies.

But no matter how healthy the ingredients are in a specific dog food, if a dog’s health doesn’t improve with a particular type of food, then it is not the right diet for that dog. Many dogs are allergic to certain types of protein or other ingredients used in the manufacture of dog food, and if your dog seems to have more health issues after changing to what you believe to be a healthier dog food, you’ll need to experiment with a few other dog food brands or recipes.

Luckily, most quality dog foods also come in smaller packages, negating the need to buy large bags and waste money if your dog can’t or won’t eat the new food.

Some signs that your dog needs to change its diet are excessive flatulence, frequent ear infections, licking the top of its paws too much, and frequent vomiting or diarrhea. If this is happening to your dog, try changing the type of protein used in its food and see if the symptoms disappear or at least improve.

A dog’s stomach will often attack unfamiliar ingredients, so a new food may not be accepted right away and often can cause diarrhea. Don’t buy a new brand or type of dog food at the first sign of these problems. Continue feeding your dog the same food for a least a week or two before deciding to try something new.

Dogs can also develop allergies to foods they eat too often, so it’s a good idea to feed your pet several foods that contain different protein sources to help it maintain a balanced diet.

Dogs are omnivores, and like humans their bodies were designed to obtain nutrients from both meat and vegetables. The reality is that pet dogs receive most of their nutrients from protein sources, so when choosing a dog food, the quality of the protein is the most important ingredient. As a general rule. three of the first five ingredients listed on the label should be protein sources.

Don’t choose dog foods containing “meat byproducts” or any with labels listing “animal protein” as a principal ingredient. These two ingredients usually don’t include muscle meat from which dogs receive most of their protein. Look for dog foods with labels listing specific ingredients like chicken and turkey. If your dog has food allergies you can choose a food containing proteins like duck, venison or rabbit.

Dogs are not able to efficiently digest corn, wheat, white rice or soy. Instead choose dog foods with whole vegetable ingredients like carrots, green beans and sweet potatoes. There are some dog foods that also include fruits like apples, and grains like oats and barley. Grain-free foods are also available that substitute potatoes in place of the grains.

Other healthy dog food ingredients include pumpkin (which helps soothe a dog’s upset stomach), cottage cheese which provides healthy bacteria, and eggs which are a healthy protein source.

There is no one dog food that’s right for every single dog, but some foods are definitely higher in quality than others. Compare labels on the dog food you now feed your pet with other brands available wherever you shop for dog food.

Depending on where you live and where you shop, you may need to visit Petco or PetSmart, or your local pet store to find a healthy dog food.

Puppy Food vs. Adult Dog Food

Monday, November 17th, 2014


Puppies have different nutrition needs than adult dogs. Puppies go through several stages of development very quickly and require a special diet, while adult dogs only need to eat to maintain their proper weight and good health. Puppy food is for puppies and adult dog food is for dogs who have outgrown their puppyhood.

In the first few months of a puppy’s life, it will cycle through many changes including cognitive development, muscle development, bone and joint development, internal organ growth, and development of its immune system.

In order for puppies to meet these requirements, they will need to eat more protein than adult dogs. Puppy foods are formulated with a higher protein count, but the quality of the protein is very important. Check the labels on any puppy food you’re considering buying to be sure the first three ingredients are protein sources, not “meat by-products” or grains such as corn, white rice or wheat. Omega 3 and 6 fatty acids are also important, but if they are not listed on the puppy food label you can easily buy the capsules at any grocery or drugstore.

Puppy foods containing some fats will provide energy and make the food more appetizing to a puppy. Puppies require 25 percent protein and 17 percent fat content in their food. Calcium and phosphorus are also important for the proper growth and development of a puppy’s teeth.

You should vary the type of food and sources of protein while a puppy is young, gradually introducing different foods to its diet. A dog’s stomach is designed to attack any foreign object, including a different type of food after becoming accustomed to only one taste or type of food for a long period of time.

Puppies usually are switched to adult dog food between the ages of one and two years. Smaller dog breeds will mature more quickly than larger breeds and may begin eating adult dog food when they are as young as one year. Larger breed dogs may not be able to eat adult dog food until they are at least two years old.

When a puppy starts putting on extra weight you may be overfeeding it or giving it a food with too many fillers that a puppy can’t digest.

Adult dog food is unlike a puppy’s food because an adult dog’s nutritional requirements are very different given that they have stopped growing and developing. They need fewer calories and a more balanced diet to maintain healthy bones, muscles and internal organs. Adult dogs require at least 18 percent protein and 15 percent fat.

As in puppies, the quality of protein for adult dogs is just as important, and the first three ingredients in an adult dog’s food should also contain protein from the healthiest sources available. There are many cheap dog foods on the market these days, especially dry foods like kibble, so please, please carefully read the labels on these foods and choose the best and healthiest food you can afford for your dog.

Proper nutrition is important for a dog at all stages of its life but is even more important during a dog’s first year while important development in its body is taking place. Shop wisely and buy the best puppy food and adult dog food your budget can handle.

Should I Feed My Dog Wet or Dry Food?

Monday, June 30th, 2014

Should I feed my dog wet or dry food is a common question that customers often ask us. But there is no one right answer because both wet and dry dog food have their own unique qualities that are beneficial to dogs. A dry dog food does help remove plaque and tartar from a dog’s teeth. It is also less expensive than canned food. Canned dog food however, contains less fillers and preservatives than dry dog foods.

Most canned dog foods also contain a higher grade of nutrients and are higher in protein than dry food. Wet foods taste great to dogs, which means they will eat every speck of food you put in their feeding dish.

The main benefit to feeding your dog a dry food diet is that it is beneficial for its dental health. Eating dry food kibble helps strengthen a dog’s jaw muscles in addition to removing some, but not all, of the plaque and tartar from a pet’s teeth. Wet food does not provide the abrasive action that helps clean the teeth.

But what if you have a new puppy? Should you be feeding it wet food or dry food? One of the most important responsibilities of raising a puppy is to provide the best quality dog food that will supply all the nutrients needed for the puppy’s growth and maintenance. Growing puppies need more protein than adult dogs to support their growing muscles and organs.

A visit to a supermarket or pet store to buy dog food can become a troubling ordeal if you’re not sure which brand to buy. There is such a wide array of commercial dog foods available, most of which are supported with heavy advertising to convince a dog owner that one particular brand is far better than any of the other competing brands. Then when you finally decide on the brand, you’re confronted with the choice of dry or canned.

So, we’re back to the question, “Which is better, dry dog food or canned?”

It really depends on your dog, your preferences, and probably your budget. Dry dog food costs less per serving than canned foods and its nutrients are more concentrated, meaning you’ll be feeding your dog a smaller quantity of food to satisfy its hunger and provide all the protein, vitamins and minerals it needs.

Although price may be one of your main considerations, the nutritional content and the ingredients are equally important factors. The top rated dog foods use grain-free formulas that contain only high-quality ingredients with no added artificial ingredients. Carefully read the labels of all the dog foods you’re considering. Fillers, by-products and common allergenic ingredients like corn, wheat, or soy are never present in a high quality dog food. Dogs have a difficult time digesting corn, and “meat-by products” are always inferior sources of protein. The bottom line is you need to choose the best food for your dog, not by price or the most advertised brand, but by what your dog needs to stay healthy and happy.

It’s not easy to give you a definitive answer on whether to feed your dog dry food or wet food, primarily because so many of the studies published on dog food are sponsored in part by manufacturers of either wet food or dry food. Unfortunately, veterinarians and animal experts have also come to a general agreement that there is no agreement.

As for me, I believe that the best thing I can do for my faithful companion is to consider his diet just as important as mine and strive to keep both of us healthy.

Are You Feeding Your Dog The Right Food?

Monday, December 10th, 2012


When you shop for dog food do you often wonder whether you are feeding your dog the right food or not?

It’s important that you get reliable advice about feeding your dog a healthy diet. If you’re like me, heading for the pet store to buy something healthy and nutritious for your pet dog can be a daunting experience. There are so many brands and types of dog food on the shelves and I don’t have hours to spend reading the long list of ingredients on every single bag.

When my dog was younger I faithfully followed the vet’s advice and paid higher-than-normal prices for my dog’s food purchased from the vet. As the years progressed and my dog’s taste buds seemed to change to encompass anything he could find to eat, I started shopping for his food at both the pet store and the grocery store. If I thought the pet store was a palace of confusion when shopping for his food, I wasn’t ready for the massive selection of dog food and treats vying for my attention from the grocery shelves. Perhaps “leering at me” is a better way to describe the cornucopia of selections at any supermarket I visited. And if you’ve ever shopped at a “super center” grocery, you have a good idea of how choosing what’s right for your dog becomes a massive chore.

When you’re shopping for food for your pet dog, take the time to discover what is REALLY in the can or bag of food you’re buying. Learn how to read the labels to protect your dog from ingredients that are of no value to your pet and may be injurious to its long-term health. Many ingredients in pet food have no nutritional value and are only added to create volume or add flavor when there is none from natural ingredients. Try to avoid products that have wheat or corn as their first ingredient. Meat or meat-by-products should be the first ingredient listed if you care about providing healthy, nutritional food for your pet.

Your loving pet deserves the same consideration you give yourself when deciding whether to buy or not buy a particular food item at the store. Feed your dog the right food by giving it only healthy products that will help it grow correctly. Feed your dog the healthiest food you can afford, and you’ll be rewarded by having your pet around a lot longer to keep you company.

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