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Posts Tagged ‘Beagles’

Best Dog Breeds For Families With Kids

Monday, May 16th, 2016


Almost 75 million dogs have been adopted into homes that already owned at least one dog. Multi-dog homes are often good for families with kids. There are other dogs to play with so a dog is not expecting constant attention from your children, or you, all the time, and there is always another dog to play with when the family is away from home.

If you’re considering adopting your very first dog or you want to replace a cherished pet that is no longer with you, it can sometimes be difficult finding the right dog for your family. All dogs are not created equal and each breed has specific traits that may or may not fit into your family situation.

Deciding which dog will make the best pet for your children depends on several things. One being whether someone in the family will have the time to give the dog plenty of exercise. You also need to consider whether a small, quiet dog or a larger, active dog fits the lifestyle of you and your children. Do you have a large home or a home with a yard? Will there be someone at home most of the time?

Answering these questions can help you decide on which breed of dog is best suited to your family’s lifestyle.

Where to find your pet is also an important consideration. Some people prefer to buy a dog from a breeder if they are searching for a purebred. But if you just want the best companion dog you can find for your family, an animal shelter or pet adoption center is probably your best choice. Pet adoption agencies and animal shelters help find homes for loving animals that have, for any number of reasons, ended up neglected, unloved, or unwanted.

The dog of your dreams may right now be living an unhappy, solitary life in the confines of an animal shelter cage. These dogs are so happy to be rescued and given a second chance at life, that they will heap loads of love on your children. Ask the staff at an animal shelter or pet adoption center to help you determine which breed of dog is right for your family.

The following breeds of dogs will provide excellent companionship, loyalty and love:

Labrador Retrievers are the most popular dog breed of all. Labrador Retrievers are friendly, lovable, smart and great with kids. They are the most popular family dog according to breeder surveys.

Golden Retrievers make great family dogs. These large dogs are extremely kind and gentle by nature and they love to play with people of any age. They can also entertain themselves with their toys so they’re not always bothering a member of the household. Just make sure you have enough space in your home as Golden Retrievers can grow to be as large as 90 pounds.

Yorkshire Terriers, also called “Yorkies” for short, are the smallest terriers of all. These tiny dogs are energetic and very protective of their owners, both adults and children. As a result, they don’t always get along well with strangers and they’re not afraid to let a visitor know. Expect a lot of “yapping” if you adopt one of these dogs.

German Shepherds are one of the most intelligent and loyal dog breeds in the world. Because of their high intelligence and great strength they make a great family pet as long as you have room for a large, lovable dog.

The Beagle has been a popular breed for over a century. These cute, lovable dogs were originally raised as hunting dogs and are known for being kind and gentle. They make great family pets.

Dachshunds are also called “wiener dogs’ and have always been a favorite with adults and children because of their cute, sausage-shaped bodies. With long bodies and short legs they look like they couldn’t move very fast but they love to run and play with their owners and each other. They can be very protective and may nip at strangers and other dogs.

Boxers play well with children, are extremely loyal and are low maintenance. They aren’t the most intelligent dogs, but they make up for it by being energetic, headstrong, and fun-loving. They require strong obedience training while they’re young or they may turn out to be unmanageable when they grow into adults.

Poodles come in both standard and miniature sizes. They are popular dogs and are beautiful, loyal and extremely intelligent.

Miniature Schnauzers are smart, obedient and enjoy non-aggressive play with children and adults. They make great pets if you’re looking for a small, lovable dog.

The best dog breed for families with kids is ultimately a personal decision that you as a parent must make. If possible, help save the life of a dog confined to a shelter or pet adoption facility. You’ll never regret the love and devotion a rescued animal will give you and your children.

Best Dog Breeds For Children

Monday, January 12th, 2015


When choosing a pet dog for the entire family to enjoy it’s helpful to know the best dog breeds for children.
Some dogs are considered to be safe for families with children, especially smaller children. Other dogs are not recommended for children because their breed is known for being too aggressive towards humans and other dogs.

An ideal family dog you can count on to be friendly to children should be smart with a medium energy level. Very large dogs and breeds who are always active and boisterous are not recommended for families with toddlers.

Large, active dogs can easily overrun a small toddler or play rough without realizing their behavior is wrong. If possible, look for an adult dog that has been trained to play with children. Puppies are cute and small but require a lot of training before being allowed to play with small children.

Some of the best breeds for children include:
Golden Retriever
If ever a breed was affectionate to a fault, it’s the Golden Retriever. They are people dogs, pure and simple. If you’ve owned one like I have, there’s never any doubt that you’re the center of its universe. Golden owners and their dogs perfected the mutual admiration society.

They can sometimes be intimidating to small children because they greet everyone with lots of enthusiasm. Smaller children may not be too pleased about getting their faces licked all the time by this friendly breed of dog.

Labrador Retriever
Labradors are also larger dogs, similar in size to a Golden Retriever. The breed is known to be intelligent and friendly making them very suitable for families with children in spite of their larger size.

Labradors have a high energy level that is ideal for families with older children, but they are quite adaptable to a family with toddlers also. The Labrador breed is very affectionate and protective of the entire family.

English Bulldog
The English Bulldog is a medium sized dog that is ideal for families with children. These Bulldogs are very easy to train and are docile and playful around children. They are intelligent and affectionate pets.

Boxers
Boxers are a friendly dog breed that’s always happy to be around children. They aren’t aggressive with children of any age. Boxers require a good amount of exercise so it’s more suitable for families with older children or teenagers.

Collie
Collies are attentive and friendly dogs for children of any age. They are easy dogs to train and are able to adapt to a household with many children. The Collie has a medium energy level and doesn’t require too much exercise.

Bichon Frise
The Bichon Frise is a small sized dog that makes a great companion for children and the whole family. Bichons don’t require a lot of exercise and behave well around babies and toddlers.

Weimaraners
Weimaraners are smaller in size with great personalities and get along well with children. This breed is friendly and usually not aggressive when playing with children.

Beagle
Beagles are gentle and affectionate dogs and a very safe breed for families with children. Beagles can be stubborn little rascals but when trained properly they are faithful companions.

English Settler
Like a Labrador, English Settlers are affectionate pets and ideal for children of any age, despite their larger size. Settlers easily adapt to indoor life and don’t require as much exercise as other large dogs.

The English settler has a cheerful personality and makes a great play companion for children of any age.

German Shepherd
German Shepherds are large dogs but can be easily trained and they make great companions for children. This breed is known for its loyalty and playfulness.

No matter which dog breed you choose for your children, your kids must also be trained to play with their new pet appropriately. Any breed of dog can become aggressive if mistreated or if it feels threatened.

How To Train A Beagle

Monday, July 14th, 2014

Beagles are known for their stubborn natures, but they are actually easy to train if you are consistent in your training techniques and use proper motivational techniques.

One of the things that Beagles are most notorious for is the difficulty in potty training them. For the Beagle owner in the midst of trying to handle this problem, just remember that potty training methods are the same regardless of the breed. It’s important to be consistent during training so your Beagle puppy understands exactly what it is being asked to do.

It will help to maintain a regular feeding schedule for your puppy which will make it easier for you to anticipate when it needs to go outside to take care of its bodily functions.

During the training period when you take your puppy outside, stand in one spot until the pup is finished with its business, then you can let it explore and sniff the trees and bushes as much as it wants (or as long as you have the patience for it).

Never leave your beagle unsupervised in the house until you are sure that it is potty trained. If you notice your puppy sniffing around the furniture and acting like it’s looking for a place to pee, head for the door as quickly as possible.

Beagles are extraordinary sniffers and are easily distracted by most smells. This often causes them to wander away, paying no attention to you. For this reason it’s important to always keep your dog on a leash until such time you’ve trained it to respond to your every command, especially “come.” It’s important that your dog comes to you every time you call it. To assist in your puppy learning this, reward it with tasty treats when it obeys your commands.

As sniffing nearly everything in sight is a Beagle’s favorite pastime, you’ll notice that your dog doesn’t pay much attention to you when you’re out on walks. To change this behavior and make it more attentive to your commands, teach the dog to focus on your commands by giving it a treat when you call its name and it responds by coming to you without hesitation.

Keep the dog’s leash loose, even while it’s sniffing around. If the leash gets tight it means the dog is not paying attention to you, and the best thing you can do is just to stop cold in your tracks and wait for the dog to understand who’s in charge of the walk. You can also walk away from whatever is distracting the dog until the leash once again is loose. This will help the dog learn that it only gets to enjoy a walk when the leash is loose.

Beagles can be downright stubborn so it’s important to teach them who’s in command at all times. What’s interesting about this requirement is that you’ll have to be more stubborn than your Beagle during the training period.

A Dog’s Lifespan

Monday, April 14th, 2014

A dog’s lifespan varies widely by the type of breed, and also its size. All dog breeds belong to the same species, evolved from the wolf, yet they age at very different rates and no one understands why there is such a variance. Some dog breeds live to be 16 to 20 years old, whereas breeds like the Irish Wolfhound have a life expectancy of only 6 to 8 years.


If you’re considering adopting an adult dog or a puppy, and you’re concerned about the dog’s lifespan, the best advice is – think small.

Around 40% of small breed dogs live longer than 10 years. In contrast, only 13% of giant breed dogs will live that long. The average 50-pound dog has a lifespan of 10 to 12 years, while a giant breed like the Great Dane is considered senior or elderly at 6 to 8 years of age. Dogs that weigh less than 30 pounds live the longest.

In a study involving more than 700 dogs and 77 different breeds, researchers found that a dog’s weight and size are the chief determining factors in a dog’s lifespan. It’s not unusual for a miniature poodle to live for 16 or 17 years, while a 12-year-old Labrador Retriever is considered an old dog. Giant breeds that weigh more than 100 pounds are considered geriatric when they reach 6 to 7 years of age.

A good rule of thumb is the larger the dog, the fewer years it will live. If you want a dog that will live for a long time you may want to consider adopting a mixed breed rather than a purebred, which on the whole usually have shorter lifespans than most mixed breeds.

When deciding between a male or female dog, remember that females tend to live a little longer than males, mimicking the human condition in this respect.

If you’re considering a purebred dog, it’s a good idea to research the types of ailments and diseases specific to the breed before deciding. Many large-breed dogs like Golden Retrievers, German Shepherds and Doberman Pinschers will develop hip dysplasia and the condition can become so serious that the dog will have to be euthanized.

Cancer is a common disease that can significantly shorten a dog’s lifespan, and some breeds like Boxers, Rottweilers, and Golden Retrievers have unusually high rates of cancer. Cancer is the most common cause of death in older dogs and nearly 42% of those dogs die from some form of cancer.

Flat-faced dogs such as Pugs and Shih Tzus, are predisposed to breathing problems that can cause overheating and even death. Cavalier King Charles Spaniels are likely to develop a heart condition called mitral valve disease. Cocker Spaniels are susceptible to recurring ear and eye infections.

Being a responsible pet owner means seeing that your dog has the correct type and amount of nourishment, and proper exercise. Very important for a dog’s lifespan is the prevention of obesity which will help your dog live a longer, healthier life.

The American Kennel Club has published a list of the most popular dog breeds and their average life span:

Beagles — 12 to 14 years
Boston terriers — about 15 years
Boxers — 11 to 14 years
Bulldogs — 10 to 12 years
Chihuahuas — 15 years or more
Dachshunds — 12 to 14 years
Doberman Pinschers — 10 to 12 years
German Shepherd dog — 10 to 14 years
German shorthaired pointers — 12 to 15 years
Golden retriever — 10 to 12 years
Labrador retriever — 10 to 14 years
Miniature Schnauzers — 15 years or more
Pomeranians — 13 to 15 years
Poodles — 10 to 15 years
Pugs — 12 to 15 years
Rottweilers — 10 to 12 years
Shetland Sheepdogs — 12 to 14 years
Shih Tzu — 11 to 15 years
Yorkshire terrier — 12 to 15 years

Weight Loss For Fat Dogs

Monday, December 23rd, 2013

Weight loss for fat dogs seems like a no-brainer. The easiest way to tell if your pet needs to shed a few pounds is to feel around its ribs and spine. You should be able to feel both, with only a thin layer of fat separating the skin from the bones. If you can’t find its ribcage, you definitely have an overweight dog.

Ask your veterinarian to evaluate your dog’s weight at the point when it reaches maturity. As a rule of thumb 15% above the ideal weight is obese, whereas 10% to 15% is considered overweight. If your dog weighs more than it should, don’t be discouraged. In industrialized nations more than 20% of all dogs are overweight or obese.

Keeping track of your dog’s weight can be a relatively easy task. Your vet will weigh your dog every visit and you’ll then be able to determine whether you’re overfeeding your dog or not.

Some breeds of dogs are naturally prone to obesity, while others like Greyhounds and German Shepherds are characteristically slim.

Small and medium size breeds are just as likely to be overweight or obese as are larger dogs. Some of the smaller and medium size dogs with a tendency to put on excess weight are Dachshunds, Scottish Terriers, Cavalier King Charles Spaniels, Beagles, Cocker Spaniels, and Basset Hounds.

Among larger breeds, Labrador Retrievers, Golden Retrievers, and Rottweilers tend to be the most susceptible breeds for weight gain.

Although not as common, giant breeds like the Bernese Mountain Dog, Newfoundlands and Saint Bernards can easily put on extra weight and you may not even notice until the dog becomes obese.

If you are serious about weight loss for your fat dog, you should begin feeding it a daily regimen of Winston’s Digest All to speed up weight loss. Overweight dogs usually lose an average of five pounds within the first two to three months of a daily regimen of Digest All.

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