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The #1 source for immediate, long-term relief for dogs suffering from degenerative diseases like hip dysplasia, OCD and arthritis.

We are specialists in the treatment of canine joint disease and its accompanying pain.

Let us help put an end to your dog’s suffering, joint stiffness, pain, immobility, and poor quality of life. Our proven products will help you easily accomplish this without the use of drugs or invasive surgery.

Joint Issues

  • Hip Dysplasia
  • Arthritis
  • Osteochondritis (OCD)
  • Stiffness/Inflammation
  • Ligament Tears
  • Growing Pains
  • Mobility Problems
  • Joint Pain
  • Back/Spinal Problems
  • Hypertrophic Osteodystrophy (HOD)

Symptoms

Is your pet becoming less active, less playful, or desiring shorter walks? The following symptoms could be early signs of OCD, Arthritis or Hip Dysplasia.

  • Moving more slowly
  • Difficulty getting up
  • Weight shift to another leg
  • Personality change
  • Reluctant to walk, jump or play
  • Refuses using stairs or the car
  • Change in appetite
  • Change in behavior
  • Muscle atrophy
  • Lagging behind
  • Yelping when touched
  • Limping
We Can Help!
 

Posts Tagged ‘Ball And Socket’

Dogs With OCD

Monday, July 11th, 2016

Dogs with OCD (or Osteochondrosis) suffer a great deal of pain and mobility issues.

When a dog has OCD, fragments of bone and cartilage become detached from larger bones and end up floating around the area encompassing a dog’s joints. The result is that any movement in the joint where those fragments are located will cause a dog to suffer from severe pain.

Dogs With OCD (or osteochondrosis)

What is Osteochondrosis (OCD)

OCD is a congenital problem that usually affects only larger dogs who seem to be predisposed to the condition.

The best way to understand the true cause of this condition is that it is a disease of the cartilage that results in large pieces of cartilage and bone becoming detached and floating freely. This causes a dog with OCD a lot of pain.

These free floating bone and cartilage pieces can lead to the development of arthritis, hip dysplasia, secondary degenerative joint disease, or other side effects.

There are several variations of osteochondrosis (OCD), and all typically affect the dog’s joints at the ankle, shoulder, elbow and knee on one or both sides of a dog’s body.

The different types of OCD are distinguished by their location on a dog’s body. They are also differentiated from each other based on the severity and the primary cause of the condition.

It’s more common for OCD to affect the forelimbs than a dog’s hind feet and legs.

Symptoms of OCD in dogs

To properly treat and identify OCD in your pet, you need to be able to recognize the symptoms of this disease. OCD can develop at any stage of a dog’s life, although it is more common in younger dogs than in older ones.

Dogs with OCD will show some of the following warning signs:

  • Pain when the affected limb is touched;
  • Muscle degeneration on the affected side of the dog’s body;
  • A general limitation of movement;
  • Lameness or difficulty moving around.

How to diagnose and treat OCD in dogs

A veterinarian will diagnose osteochondrosis using a series of X-ray tests.

Treatment of the disease requires lifestyle changes. The dog’s exercise routine must be changed to ensure that the dog can remain active and suffer fewer mobility problems.

Dogs suffering with joint diseases like OCD, arthritis, bursitis, hip dysplasia and other degenerative problems with the shoulders, elbows and hocks can find immediate and long-term relief without drugs with a regular regimen of Winston’s Joint System, a combination of three, totally-natural whole food supplements developed by a Naturopathic Doctor for his own dog. Winston’s contains no drugs and there are no side-effects.

Winston’s Pain Formula is another product proven to be fast acting and highly effective in relieving the pain in a dog caused by these diseases. Both of these products help your dog to recover much faster.

Dogs with OCD will require a change in diet and careful observation to prevent overfeeding and weight gain which contribute to damage of the joints due to OCD. Work with your vet to determine if your dog’s diet is properly supporting its joint health or if it can be changed to be more effective.

Since 1990, Winston’s Joint System and Winston’s Pain Formula have helped heal over twenty thousand dogs from all over the world. Our staff specializes in hip dysplasia, arthritis and all joint, pain and mobility issues.
 
There is an excellent chance we can help your dog, so please contact us at: www.dogshealth.com or call our toll free number at 888-901-5557.

Joint Disease in Dogs

Monday, March 11th, 2013

It’s inevitable that many dogs will develop some form of joint disease during their lives. It may be mild and unnoticeable, or it could be debilitating, severely affecting a dog’s quality of life by causing complete lameness and the inability to get up and down without help.

Joint Disease in Dogs

Some dogs will develop joint disease in the first few years of their lives but not display any visible signs until much later in life. This is often dependent on the dog’s breed. Dogs are also very susceptible to arthritis, and larger dog breeds are more vulnerable than smaller breeds.

The most common signs of joint disease in dogs include stiffness, limping, or favoring one limb over another. After awakening from sleep a dog with joint disease may find it difficult to get up or be reluctant to climb stairs.

Diseases that can affect a dog’s joints fall into ten major classifications. These joint diseases occur as a result of
(1) ligament, tendon, or muscle disease,
(2) bone fractures involving the joint,
(3) dietary and hormonal diseases such as hyperparathyroidism and obesity,
(4) developmental disorders like hip dysplasia and elbow dysplasia or OCD,
(5) congenital disorders,
(6) metabolic disorders,
(7) cancer,
(8) inflammatory joint diseases like Lyme disease or rheumatoid arthritis,
(9) degenerative joint disease (osteoarthritis), and
(10) degenerative spinal joint disease.

Treatment of joint disease in dogs

The treatment of hip dysplasia and osteoarthritis has vastly improved with the introduction of supplements like Winston’s Joint System.

Because hip dysplasia is primarily an inherited condition, there is no product on the market that can prevent its development, only treat it.

Dogs with hip dysplasia will need to be fed a proper diet and be put on a limited exercise routine.

There are anti-inflammatories like Rimadyl that are used to relieve a dog’s pain. Since Rimadyl and other drugs are controlled substances, they are available only through veterinarians.

Unfortunately, drugs like Rimadyl cannot decrease the progression of degenerative joint disease and often have serious side effects. You should consult with your vet and learn about all the possible side effects before agreeing to treat your dog with prescription medications such as Rimadyl.

Surgery is sometimes performed on dogs with serious cases of hip dysplasia. These surgeries are not always able to stop the progression of the disease and some dogs benefit only by having their lives made a little more comfortable.

Because of the high cost of this type of surgery and the questionable value of performing the procedure on older dogs, the management of pain and inflammation remains the only realistic option for many pet owners.

Weight management is very important for all dogs suffering from hip dysplasia. If surgery or other medical procedure is deemed necessary, the results will be more beneficial if the dog is not overweight.

Up to half of the dogs in the U.S. are overweight, so chances are very good that dogs with hip dysplasia or osteoarthritis are also overweight. Helping a dog lose pounds and get back to its recommended weight is one of the most important things a dog owner can do to help their pet who is suffering from hip dysplasia or arthritis.

Dogs who are overweight and are diagnosed with hip dysplasia or arthritis need to be exercised in ways that provide a good range of motion and muscle building, while limiting wear and tear on the dog’s joints.

Walking, swimming, slow jogging, and going up and down stairs are excellent low-impact exercises. An exercise program should be tailored to a dog based on the severity of the hip dysplasia or osteoarthritis.

The dog’s weight and physical condition must be factored into planning the types of exercise it should be subjected to. The wrong type of exercise can cause harm to the dog. A veterinarian will be able to recommend the best exercise program that’s appropriate for the dog’s condition.

Glucosamine and chondroitin are two supplements commonly used to treat animals for osteoarthritis. They are effective on some dogs but not on all dogs.

Glucosamine is the major sugar found in the important building blocks necessary for the synthesis and maintenance of joint cartilage.

Chondroitin enhances this synthesis and prevents damage of enzymes in the joint. These products are not painkillers.

Glucosamine and chondroitin work on the dog’s cartilage-forming cells in an attempt to repair the damaged cartilage. These products take at least six weeks to begin their healing, and if successful, a dog will need to continue taking the products for the rest of their lives to prevent further cartilage breakdown.

Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have been developed for dogs with osteoarthritis. Carprofen, marketed as Rimadyl is the best known of these medications. It is a strong painkiller and anti-inflammatory agent, and is available only by prescription because of its potential for serious side effects.

A much safer treatment for dogs suffering with joint diseases such as arthritis, bursitis, osteochondrosis (OCD), hip dysplasia and other degenerative joint disease is Winston’s Joint System, a combination of three, totally-natural whole food supplements developed by a Naturopathic Doctor for his own dog. Winston’s contains no potentially dangerous drugs.

Winston’s Joint System provides many of the raw materials essential for the synthesis of the joint-lubricating synovial fluid as well as the repair of articular cartilage and connective tissue. Within the first 30 days of treatment, dogs on Winston’s show noticeable and often remarkable improvement.

Joint disease in dogs is a condition that affects such a large number of pet dogs and there is no known cure. Surgery works for some dogs but is almost prohibitively expensive. No dog should have to suffer with these debilitating diseases and that is the reason Winston’s Joint System was originally developed.

If your dog has been diagnosed with arthritis, bursitis, osteochondrosis (OCD), hip dysplasia or other degenerative joint disease, you owe it to your pet to help make its life better by treating it with Winston’s proven formula.

Since 1990, Winston’s Joint System and Winston’s Pain Formula have helped heal over twenty thousand dogs from all over the world. Our staff specializes in hip dysplasia, arthritis and all joint, pain and mobility issues.
 
There is an excellent chance we can help your dog, so please contact us at: www.dogshealth.com or call our toll free number at 888-901-5557.

Hip Dysplasia in Great Danes

Tuesday, December 28th, 2010

Hip dysplasia is a debilitating disease that affects the hip joints in dogs. It is commonly found among large breed dogs but also can occur in medium and small size breeds. Certain breeds like Great Danes are more susceptible to hip dysplasia, and the disease is more common in pure-bred dogs than in mixed breeds.

Hip Dysplasia in Great Danes

Hip dysplasia is caused by the malformation of the hip in a dog. This usually occurs at a young age when they are still growing and the bones are being formed. The ball and socket of the hip joint grows unevenly, causing the right and left hind legs to become affected.

This usually happens as a result of the muscles, ligaments and connective tissues surrounding and supporting the hip joint becoming lax. Instead of the bones growing towards each other, they grow apart as the ligament and capsule holding the bones together become strained and stretched. The bones are no longer in alignment and put pressure on the nerves, which causes the symptoms and signs associated with the disease.

Hip dysplasia in Great Danes

Symptoms of hip dysplasia include moving more slowly, difficulty in getting up or lying down, reluctance to walk, jump or play, refusing to use stairs or get into the car, muscle atrophy, limping, yelping when touched, changes in appetite, and personality changes. Both older and younger dogs suffering from hip dysplasia feel the most discomfort in cold, damp weather.

Great Danes who develop hip dysplasia or arthritis suffer from pain and stiffness in their joints which greatly diminishes their ability to live a quality life and remain active.

They feel pain after exercising and during their normal daily activities. Their hind legs tend to be stiff during and after exercising. They may also find it hard to stand on their hind feet in the morning and often try to avoid putting any pressure at all on their hind legs. If it gets too painful a dog will find it hard to stand up without help from a human.

Treatment

When a Great Dane is diagnosed with hip dysplasia and the choices for treatment seem limited to expensive surgery or questionable drugs, I recommend you begin treating your dog with Winston’s Joint System, an all-natural formula developed by a Naturopathic Doctor to heal his own beloved dog. This proven formula has been giving relief from pain and stiffness to all breeds and ages of dogs for more than 20 years.

Although there is no actual cure for canine hip dysplasia, arthritis, or osteochondrosis (OCD), regular treatment with Winston’s Joint System will give immediate and long-term relief without drugs.

Winston’s is a combination of three, totally-natural whole food supplements developed by a Naturopathic Doctor for his own dog. There are no side-effects because it’s just good whole food. In addition, there are no dosage problems because the dog’s body uses only what it needs.

Diagnosis

Although canine hip dysplasia (CHD) may remain unseen in some dogs, early detection is critical. The first step to determining whether a Great Dane has hip dysplasia is through a careful physical examination by a veterinarian who will observe the dog as it sits, stands, and walks. This is the first measure to check for characteristic signs of hip dysplasia such as a side-to-side swinging gait, lameness, and arched back which is caused by shifting weight forward, or the presence of overdeveloped front-leg and shoulder muscles.

X-rays are the easiest way to diagnose hip dysplasia in a dog. A vet will evaluate the joints and take into consideration any symptoms like those listed above because sometimes an x-ray won’t reveal the full extent of the dog’s pain. The vet will also consider the dog’s movements and any evidence of lameness before making a diagnosis.

The veterinarian will move the dog’s hip joint to assess its range of motion and check for pain with the joint extended. The vet will also listen for the “click” of the hip popping out of joint and for any grating sound of bone on bone that indicates cartilage loss.

A Great Dane is a wonderful, proud animal and deserves the love and attention of a caring owner. When hip dysplasia, arthritis, or OCD strikes, the first thing to do is schedule a visit to your vet. If surgery is not recommended, then you should start your dog on a regimen of Winston’s Joint System.

Since 1990, Winston’s Joint System and Winston’s Pain Formula have helped heal over twenty thousand dogs from all over the world. Our staff specializes in hip dysplasia, arthritis and all joint, pain and mobility issues.
 
There is an excellent chance we can help your dog, so please contact us at: www.dogshealth.com or call our toll free number at 888-901-5557.

Hip Dysplasia in Golden Retrievers

Tuesday, December 7th, 2010

Hip dysplasia in Golden Retrievers is a genetic disorder, an inherited instability of the dog’s joints which is common in the breed.

Golden Retrievers

The Golden Retriever was first developed in Scotland, the original breeding being a cross between a male yellow-colored Retriever with a Tweed Water Spaniel female dog.

Some variations exist between the British type Golden Retrievers prevalent throughout Europe and Australia, and those of American lines, and these differences are reflected in the breed standard.

The muzzle of the British type of dog is wider and shorter, and its forehead is blockier. It has shorter legs, with a slightly deeper chest, and a shorter tail. Its features make it generally heavier than the American Retriever. The eyes of the European type are noted for their roundness and darkness as contrasted with the triangular or slanted composition of American Golden Retrievers.

Retrievers’ coat colors range from a light golden color to dark golden. The Golden’s coat can also be mahogany colored, which is referred to as “redhead”. As a Golden grows older, its coat can become darker or lighter, along with a noticeable whitening of the fur on and around the muzzle. A puppy’s color is usually much lighter than its adult coat.

Golden Retrievers shed moderately to heavily, shedding year round, especially in the spring and early summer. The coat and undercoat are dense and waterproof, and may be straight or moderately wavy.

The temperament of the Golden Retriever is described as kindly, friendly and confident. They are equally friendly with both strangers and those familiar to them. Their trusting, gentle disposition makes them a poor guard dog. Unprovoked aggression or hostility towards people, dogs or other animals is not in keeping with the character of the breed. The typical Golden Retriever is calm and naturally intelligent, with an exceptional eagerness to please.

Golden Retrievers are also noted for their intelligence, ranking fourth after the Border Collie, Poodle, and German Shepherd. Goldens are one of the brightest dogs ranked by obedience command trainability. These dogs are also renowned for their patience with children.

The average life span for a Golden Retriever is 11 to 11½ years.

Hip dysplasia in Golden Retrievers

Golden Retrievers are susceptible to genetic disorders like hip and elbow dysplasia which is common in the breed.

Hip dysplasia is an inherited instability of the dog’s joints. This instability can be compounded by environmental factors such as injury to the joint and by dietary factors such as pushing rapid growth in puppies.

It is not possible to predict when or even if hip dysplasia will occur in a Golden.

However, there are some easily noticeable symptoms of hip dysplasia which include moving more slowly, difficulty in getting up or lying down, reluctance to walk, jump or play, refusing to use stairs or get into the car, muscle atrophy, limping, yelping when touched, changes in appetite, and personality changes.

X-rays are the easiest way to diagnose hip dysplasia in a Golden Retriever.

A vet will evaluate the joints and take into consideration any symptoms like those listed above because sometimes an x-ray won’t reveal the full extent of the dog’s pain. The vet will also consider the dog’s movements and any evidence of lameness before making a diagnosis.

Treatment

When a Golden is diagnosed with hip dysplasia and the choices for treatment seem limited to expensive surgery or questionable drugs, many holistic vets recommend you begin treating your dog with Winston’s Joint System, an all-natural formula developed by a Naturopathic Doctor to heal his own beloved dog. This proven formula has been giving relief from pain and stiffness to all breeds and ages of dogs for more than 20 years.

Although there is no actual cure for canine hip dysplasia, arthritis, or osteochondrosis (OCD), regular treatment with Winston’s Joint System will give immediate and long-term relief without drugs.

Winston’s is a combination of three, totally-natural whole food supplements developed by a Naturopathic Doctor for his own dog. There are no side-effects because it’s just good whole food. In addition, there are no dosage problems because the dog’s body uses only what it needs.

Surgery is normally only considered in cases of hip dysplasia if all other treatments have failed to improve the dog’s condition. This procedure is expensive and the recovery time for a dog can be considerably lengthened if the post-surgical dog is not cared for properly. The desired result of any surgical procedure is to provide an acceptable quality of life for the dog, so surgery should be considered only if a vet is reasonably certain of success.

The best way to treat hip dysplasia is of course to prevent it. Before buying a puppy, be sure it has been certified free of hip dysplasia. Certified-free parents are not guaranteed to have dysplasia-free pups.

You want your beautiful Golden to be with you as long as possible so be alert to any signs or symptoms of hip dysplasia or arthritis, and begin early treatment of your pet with Winston’s Joint System.

Since 1990, Winston’s Joint System and Winston’s Pain Formula have helped heal over twenty thousand dogs from all over the world. Our staff specializes in hip dysplasia, arthritis and all joint, pain and mobility issues.
 
There is an excellent chance we can help your dog, so please contact us at: www.dogshealth.com or call our toll free number at 888-901-5557.

Hip Dysplasia in Large and Older Dogs

Tuesday, November 30th, 2010

Hip dysplasia in large and older dogs -medically referred to as Canine Hip Dysplasia (CHD)- is a common disease in large breeds. But it can also affect dogs of medium-sized breeds, although it’s rarer in small breeds.

Hip Dysplasia in Large and Older Dogs

Hip dysplasia is genetically transmitted from a dog’s parents or grandparents, but because multiple genes are involved, scientists have not been able to determine the pattern of inheritance.

Adding to the problem of causation is the complicated interplay between heredity and the environment. Environmental factors can also have an influence on whether or not a particular dog or breed of dog will eventually develop hip dysplasia.

Canine hip dysplasia is the most common orthopedic problem in dogs and is caused by a loose hipbone to thighbone connection leading to hind joint pain and lameness ranging from mild to severely crippling.

Hip dysplasia is a very debilitating disease and painful for the poor dog who has to suffer with it.

Canine hip dysplasia most often affects large breeds like Golden Retrievers, Labradors, German Shepherds, Rottweilers, Pitbulls, Great Danes and Saint Bernards.

⇒ Read more about the breeds of dogs susceptible to dysplasia.

Early symptoms of hip dysplasia include:

  • Changes in gait, including a “bunny hop” walk
  • Sitting rather than standing
  • Difficulty getting up
  • Crying or yelping when an affected joint is moved or touched
  • Signs of pain during and after activity
  • Pain in the rear legs and hips, especially in the mornings
  • Trouble climbing stairs, getting in the car or running
  • Avoiding normal activities like a morning or evening walk

These symptoms of hip dysplasia may seem like gradual changes that are common to an aging dog, but by noticing these physical signs in the early stages, an owner can prevent further pain and suffering for their dog and improve the dog’s mobility and activity levels before the disease has developed to the point that surgery or powerful medications are required.

⇒ Read more about the hip dysplasia treating methods.

Dogs who do suffer with joint diseases such as arthritis, osteochondrosis (OCD), hip dysplasia and other degenerative joint problems can experience immediate and long-term relief with a regimen of Winston’s Joint System.

Winston’s Joint System is a combination of three, totally-natural whole food supplements developed by a Naturopathic Doctor for his own dog. There are no drugs in Winston’s and there are no side-effects because it’s just good whole food. And there are no dosage problems because the dog’s body uses only what it needs.

Winston’s provides many of the raw materials essential for the synthesis of the joint-lubricating synovial fluid as well as the repair of articular cartilage and connective tissue. Within the first 30 days of treatment, dogs on Winston’s Joint System show noticeable and often remarkable improvement.

Hip dysplasia in large and older dogs is a genetic disease that often can’t be prevented.

It is a progressively degenerative disease, so any measure of prevention you can take at an early stage will improve the quality of your dog’s life for years.

If you own a large breed dog, or your dog is a senior dog showing signs of joint disease, you owe it to your faithful companion to start him on Winston’s Joint System as soon as possible.

Since 1990, Winston’s Joint System and Winston’s Pain Formula have helped heal over twenty thousand dogs from all over the world. Our staff specializes in hip dysplasia, arthritis and all joint, pain and mobility issues.
 
There is an excellent chance we can help your dog, so please contact us at: www.dogshealth.com or call our toll free number at 888-901-5557.

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