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The #1 source for immediate, long-term relief for dogs suffering from degenerative diseases like hip dysplasia, OCD and arthritis.

We are specialists in the treatment of canine joint disease and its accompanying pain.

Let us help put an end to your dog’s suffering, joint stiffness, pain, immobility, and poor quality of life. Our proven products will help you easily accomplish this without the use of drugs or invasive surgery.

Joint Issues

  • Hip Dysplasia
  • Arthritis
  • Osteochondritis (OCD)
  • Stiffness/Inflammation
  • Ligament Tears
  • Growing Pains
  • Mobility Problems
  • Joint Pain
  • Back/Spinal Problems
  • Hypertrophic Osteodystrophy (HOD)

Symptoms

Is your pet becoming less active, less playful, or desiring shorter walks? The following symptoms could be early signs of OCD, Arthritis or Hip Dysplasia.

  • Moving more slowly
  • Difficulty getting up
  • Weight shift to another leg
  • Personality change
  • Reluctant to walk, jump or play
  • Refuses using stairs or the car
  • Change in appetite
  • Change in behavior
  • Muscle atrophy
  • Lagging behind
  • Yelping when touched
  • Limping
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Author Archive

Why Dogs Sleep So Much

Wednesday, January 30th, 2019

Does it seem like your pup is sleeping all the time? It’s not just your imagination. Dogs spend a good part of their life sleeping because that’s how they’re genetically designed. In fact, the time to worry is when your dog isn’t sleeping as much as he used to. Changes in sleeping patterns can indicate a problem—whether that means a health issue or stress.

Normal Patterns Of Sleep
All dogs sleep a lot—and some sleep even more. In fact, depending on the breed, your dog might sleep up to 18 hours a day. Larger breeds sleep more, according to PetPlace. On average, though, a dog sleeps half the day away—about 12 hours or so. Dogs don’t sleep the way we do. Instead, they take a lot of short naps. This helps them recharge their energy quickly, so they can be ready to get up and go again.

Sleeping At Night
As they get older, dogs are able to sleep through the night—but only because their owners do. In fact, wild dogs tend to be very active at night, often hunting in the darkness. Domestic dogs have adapted to their humans’ schedules, though, and they might snooze the night away as long as they have a comfortable place for it—and that includes not only a comfy bed but also a room at an appropriate temperature.

REM Sleep
Just like humans, dogs experience REM—or rapid eye movement—sleep cycles. These are the deepest sleep cycles, necessary for the brain to process information. Since dogs sleep for short periods only, they need to sleep often in order to get enough REM sleep and be able to keep their brains in top working condition. While it takes humans 90 minutes to reach REM, dogs will reach REM in about 15 minutes, according to Perfect Puppy Care. This means they can wake and go back to sleep—and be back in that vital REM sleep quickly. If you’ve ever seen your dog making weird sleeping noises or kicking his legs, you’ve seen REM sleep.

Excessive Sleeping
While tons of napping is common, your dog should not be asleep all the time. In between naps, he should be active and moving around. If you think Doggie is sleeping too much, he might be suffering from depression or a medical condition. Some medications also cause sleepiness. Old dogs also sleep more, as do newborn puppies.

References
The Dog Bowl: Why Do Dogs Sleep So Much? PetPlace: Sleep Behavior of Dogs Dogs Trust: Sleeping and Resting The Stanford Center for Sleep Sciences and Medicine: Narcolepsy and Hypersomnias (Excessive Sleep) Perfect Puppy Care: How Dogs Sleep

Why Dogs Vomit Undigested Food

Sunday, January 27th, 2019

Vomiting Causes

Vomiting is not the same as regurgitation, which is the passive expulsion of undigested food or fluid from the esophagus that is not accompanied by abdominal effort. Vomiting is common in domestic dogs and usually is a sign of some other underlying problem.

Many things can cause a dog to vomit. Dogs often vomit after eating rancid food, foreign bodies, trash, poisonous plants or other toxic or unpleasant things.

Chronic vomiting, especially if accompanied by profuse or bloody diarrhea, is a serious medical condition that may be attributable to food or environmental allergies, gastrointestinal disease, dietary imbalances, infections, adverse drug reactions, kidney or liver disease, ingestion of toxins or neurological abnormalities. Vomiting can also be triggered by stress, excitement or exposure to loud noises, such as thunderstorms or fireworks.

Vomiting of undigested or partially digested food more than 12 hours after it was eaten reflects an abnormal delay in the proper emptying of stomach contents into the intestinal tract. Frequent vomiting can cause dehydration/volume depletion, electrolyte disturbances, nutritional deficiencies, poor body condition, weight loss, inflammation of the esophagus (esophagitis) and/or aspiration pneumonia.

Chronic vomiting, regardless of the cause, can lead to severe dietary deficiencies if the problem is not addressed. Dehydration can be life-threatening, and electrolytic imbalances can cause muscle weakness, tremors and neurological problems.
While an occasional bout of vomiting can be normal, frequent episodes should be assessed by a veterinarian. Vomiting that is accompanied by severe, bloody or mucoid diarrhea, lethargy, weakness, depression, pain, fever or confusion warrants an immediate trip to the veterinary clinic. If a dog can’t hold down even small amounts of food or water, something is seriously wrong. The dog could be suffering from poisoning, an intestinal obstruction, pancreatitis, bloat/gastric dilatation and volvulus, or an infection with parvovirus. All of these conditions are life-threatening and require immediate medical attention.

Vomiting Prevention

There is no magical way to prevent a dog from vomiting. Prevention requires identification and removal of the underlying cause of the condition. Because there are so many diverse causes of vomiting, there is no one protocol to recommend. In general, dogs should not be exposed to potentially toxic substances. They also should have regular veterinary examinations to ensure their good health. High-quality nutrition and a healthy lifestyle, with moderate exercise, lots of fresh air, warm and comfortable housing and plenty of human companionship, are also important to maintaining the good health of our beloved canine companions.
Other

Comments

Treating recurrent vomiting in dogs requires identifying and removing the initiating cause and then providing the appropriate fluids, electrolytes and medications to soothe the stomach. Owners should not panic over an occasional episode of vomiting, but they probably should take their dog to the veterinarian if it is vomiting repeatedly.

When A Dog Is Ready To Whelp

Saturday, January 26th, 2019

Is your dog about to give birth? Read this blog for some answers to common questions about whelping.

The first thing to do is talk to your vet. It is important to understand the potential risks and be able to identify signs of complications. Ideally, your vet has been checking on your dog throughout the pregnancy. The vet will talk to you about preparation and may also be able to help you find the right supplies.

Knowing When Your Dog Is Ready to Give Birth

Within about 48 hours of delivery, a pregnant dog typically shows signs of nesting. These signs may include scratching at her bed and looking for a safe place to have the puppies. You should begin to take your dog’s rectal temperature once or twice a day as her due date approaches. When the rectal temperature drops below 100°F (normal body temperature is 100-102°F) this is a good sign that labor will begin within about 24 hours.

During the first stage of labor, your dog will begin to experience uterine contractions. She may also start pacing or digging. Many dogs will pant or shake. Some dogs even vomit. All of this is considered normal behavior and typically lasts for six to 12 hours until the cervix dilates and she is ready to deliver her pups.

What You Can Do to Help

In the beginning, the best thing you can do is keep your distance while quietly observing your dog whelp. It may surprise you to learn that dogs don’t usually need much help giving birth. In fact, it is fascinating to watch a dog’s instincts take over as they whelp and nurse.

When the dog is ready to deliver a puppy, she will typically strain, or push, for about 10-30 minutes before the puppy emerges. Each newborn puppy is covered with a membrane that must be removed in order for the puppy to breathe. Most mothers instinctively do this by biting at the membrane and licking the puppy clean. If the mother does not do this within about two minutes, you will need to assist. Remove the membrane and rub the puppy clean with a towel. Clamp the umbilical cord with a hemostat and tie it with the umbilical tape or string (or, you can tie the actual cord in a knot). Cut the cord with surgical scissors on the side away from the puppy. Note: Never pull on the umbilical cord as it could cause injury.

The puppies are generally born about 45-60 minutes apart. In between pups, the mother may or may not pass the placenta from the previous pup. You might want to prevent your dog from eating the placenta because it often causes vomiting later.

About halfway through delivering the pups, the mother may need to take a break. Up to four hours may pass before she begins straining again. There is no cause for concern unless she goes longer than four hours before beginning to deliver the next pup. Hopefully, you have an idea of the number of pups and their sizes. Your vet may take x-rays around day 45 to determine the number of puppies.

Some puppies may be born tail first. This is not abnormal and is not usually a problem unless the pup seems stuck.

Signs of Complications

Call your veterinarian right away if any of the following occurs:

She does not go into labor within 24 hours of her temperature dropping below 100°F

Your dog is straining/having contractions for more than 30-60 minutes and no puppy is born

A puppy appears to be stuck in the birth canal, or the puppy is halfway out, and the mother cannot push the puppy anymore.

It has been more than four hours since the last pup, and you know there are more inside

She appears to be in extreme pain

The gestation period has reached 70 days

You have other concerns about the mother or her puppies

When in doubt, contact a veterinarian with questions. Ideally, you will already have a relationship with a vet experienced in canine reproduction.

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