Hip Dysplasia in Pit Bulls

Bubba is a brown pit bull or pit bull terrier mix looking up at the camera with a happy smile.

Hip Dysplasia in Pit Bulls – What Is It?

Hip dysplasia is a degenerative condition, which can affect any dog. Although the causes may vary, the effects are always the same: loss of mobility, increasing pain, impaired gait, and even behavioral and mood changes in your dog (including snappishness and depression).

What Are the Signs of Hip Dysplasia in Pit Bulls?

  • Hobbles, or walks/trots with an irregular gait
  • Tries to keep weight off one of the rear legs
  • Starts to slow down or limp on a favorite walk or run
  • Stays in bed instead of playing outdoors
  • Whimpers or yelps when climbing stairs
  • Flinches when the hip area or lower back are touched

What Happens in Hip Dysplasia – Why Does It Hurt?

Dysplasia is simply the dislocation of a bone from its proper place. “Plasia” is the Greek word for molding, so it’s easy to visualize an architectural form, like a beam or column, separating from its stabilizing molding.  Hip dysplasia or displacement is one of the best-known types of dysplasia in dogs.

The degenerative process of hip dysplasia is gradual. The onset of symptoms, specifically pain, is also somewhat gradual taking place over the course of years. In simple terms, the two bones of the hip joint shift out of alignment. The structure of a dog’s hip bones is similar to our human hip formation, consisting of a precisely fitted ball-and-socket joint. This is called a “spheroidal” joint, referring to the spherical head of the distal or articulating bone, which fit into the cup-like cavity of the accompanying bone.

Perhaps because they are such hand-working structures, the ball and socket joints are prone to disease, and simple mechanical wear and damage over time.

Here’s what we’ve learned so far:

  • Hip dysplasia results in several symptoms which reduce mobility and cause pain.
  • The muscles and joints become lax, and the joint capsule, a strong band of connective tissue which circled the bones for added stability, loses its elastic strength.
  • As this happens, the articular (working) surfaces of the two bones lose contact with each other. The bones slowly separate as the soft tissues around the joint degenerate. The disease may affect one or both right and left hips.

With the loss of protective scaffolding between the bone surfaces, the nerves in the bone endings themselves become exposed. When bone touches bone, there is acute pain. In addition, the loss of tensile strength of the supporting tendons, muscle, and cartilage means that other structures in the hip and leg must compensate in terms of weight-bearing and movement. This unnatural compensation may cause fatigue and pain. It may even cause the dog to injure itself—running to catch a Frisbee, or climbing stairs, for instance.

What Causes Hip Dysplasia?

Experts disagree as to the source of hip dysplasia in dogs.

  • Too much food

    One theory is that feeding a young, growing dog too many calories early in its development contributes to the disorder.

  • Too much exercise

    Another theory is that too much exercise, or the wrong kind of exercise, or simply too much high-impact exercise, such as fetching, jumping, and catching a ball or Frisbee on concrete, contributes to hip dysplasia.

A factual observation about this condition is that hip dysplasia tends to affect large breeds more so than smaller dogs. This, too, is relative—it is possible for small dogs to become affected by hip dysplasia, too.  However, we correctly associate the condition most frequently with big breeds.

These breeds do carry a genetic predisposition toward the condition. It is also true that purebreds, especially large dogs, are most likely to become vulnerable to hip dysplasia, therefore calling upon informed and responsible breeding practices.

What You Can Do to Improve Your Dog’s Quality of Life

Our first instinct as dog lovers is to stop the pain. Sometimes our decision-making process is clouded by emotion—guilt, fear, even panic when we see our beloved canine companion suffering. Many conventional treatments for hip dysplasia in dogs have side effects, or simply don’t work.

1) Try Winston’s Joint System and Winston’s Pain Formula

A naturopathic doctor developed Winston’s Joint System and Winston’s Pain Formula. These offer support and relief for many conditions affecting your dog’s joints including hip dysplasia, arthritis, and inflammatory diseases. These are also common in dogs, attacking the cartilage, muscles, and membrane linings of cartilage and joints.

These may offer your dog safe alternatives: calming inflammation as an immediate solution and helping to rebuild joint integrity as a long-range treatment. These trusted products can slow or even stop the degeneration of the hip joint. In many cases, hip replacement surgery which is the last resort may be prevented altogether. For over 30 years, Winston’s formulas have helped thousands of dogs from all over the world.

2) Schedule a visit with your veterinarian

If your dog is clearly in pain, schedule a visit with your veterinarian. An X-ray examination will be recommended as a first step.

3) Monitor your dog’s weight

Obesity makes hip dysplasia worse. If your dog becomes less active, weight gain may become a challenge. Eliminate treats, and if possible, offer your dog low-impact exercises like stretching and swimming.

4) Remove unnecessary physical stressors from your dog’s life

5) Replace stairs with a ramp

While your dog is recovering, this prevents further damage to the damaged hip.

6) Provide a padded dog bed

Sleeping on a hard surface may increase the inflammation associated with hip dysplasia. A gel bed, which actually contains a soft jelly that conforms to your dog’s body, relieves pressure from sore joints.

7) Experiment with low-heat heating pads or fleece-covered hot water bottles

Together with gentle massages, these ways relax your dog and provide comfort during the healing process.

Is Your Dog Experiencing Hip Dysplasia or Other Forms of Pain? We Can Help

Does your dog have trouble walking, standing, or getting up? There is an excellent chance we can help your dog.

Since 1990, Winston’s Joint System and Winston’s Pain Formula have helped heal over twenty thousand dogs from all over the world. Our staff specializes in hip dysplasia, arthritis, and all joint pain & mobility issues.

To start your dog’s pain-free life, please contact us at www.dogshealth.com or call our toll-free number at 888-901-5557.

 

Hip Dysplasia in Shih Tzus

Hip Dysplasia in Shih Tzus- What Is It?

Hip dysplasia is a degenerative condition, which can affect any dog. Although the causes may vary, the effects are always the same: loss of mobility, increasing pain, impaired gait, and even behavioral and mood changes in your dog (including snappishness and depression).

What Are the Signs of Hip Dysplasia in Shih Tzus?

  • Hobbles, or walks/trots with an irregular gait
  • Tries to keep weight off one of the rear legs
  • Starts to slow down or limp on a favorite walk or run
  • Stays in bed instead of playing outdoors
  • Whimpers or yelps when climbing stairs
  • Flinches when the hip area or lower back are touched

What Happens in Hip Dysplasia – Why Does It Hurt?

Dysplasia is simply the dislocation of a bone from its proper place. “Plasia” is the Greek word for molding, so it’s easy to visualize an architectural form, like a beam or column, separating from its stabilizing molding.  Hip dysplasia or displacement is one of the best-known types of dysplasia in dogs.

The degenerative process of hip dysplasia is gradual. The onset of symptoms, specifically pain, is also somewhat gradual taking place over the course of years. In simple terms, the two bones of the hip joint shift out of alignment. The structure of a dog’s hip bones is similar to our human hip formation, consisting of a precisely fitted ball-and-socket joint. This is called a “spheroidal” joint, referring to the spherical head of the distal or articulating bone, which fit into the cup-like cavity of the accompanying bone.

Perhaps because they are such hand-working structures, the ball and socket joints are prone to disease, and simple mechanical wear and damage over time.

Here’s what we’ve learned so far:

  • Hip dysplasia results in several symptoms which reduce mobility and cause pain.
  • The muscles and joints become lax, and the joint capsule, a strong band of connective tissue which circled the bones for added stability, loses its elastic strength.
  • As this happens, the articular (working) surfaces of the two bones lose contact with each other. The bones slowly separate as the soft tissues around the joint degenerate. The disease may affect one or both right and left hips.

With the loss of protective scaffolding between the bone surfaces, the nerves in the bone endings themselves become exposed. When bone touches bone, there is acute pain. In addition, the loss of tensile strength of the supporting tendons, muscle, and cartilage means that other structures in the hip and leg must compensate in terms of weight-bearing and movement. This unnatural compensation may cause fatigue and pain. It may even cause the dog to injure itself—running to catch a Frisbee, or climbing stairs, for instance.

What Causes Hip Dysplasia?

Experts disagree as to the source of hip dysplasia in dogs.

  • Too much food

    One theory is that feeding a young, growing dog too many calories early in its development contributes to the disorder.

  • Too much exercise

    Another theory is that too much exercise, or the wrong kind of exercise, or simply too much high-impact exercise, such as fetching, jumping, and catching a ball or Frisbee on concrete, contributes to hip dysplasia.

A factual observation about this condition is that hip dysplasia tends to affect large breeds more so than smaller dogs. This, too, is relative—it is possible for small dogs to become affected by hip dysplasia, too.  However, we correctly associate the condition most frequently with big breeds.

These breeds do carry a genetic predisposition toward the condition. It is also true that purebreds, especially large dogs, are most likely to become vulnerable to hip dysplasia, therefore calling upon informed and responsible breeding practices.

What You Can Do to Improve Your Dog’s Quality of Life

Our first instinct as dog lovers is to stop the pain. Sometimes our decision-making process is clouded by emotion—guilt, fear, even panic when we see our beloved canine companion suffering. Many conventional treatments for hip dysplasia in dogs have side effects, or simply don’t work.

1) Try Winston’s Joint System and Winston’s Pain Formula

A naturopathic doctor developed Winston’s Joint System and Winston’s Pain Formula. These offer support and relief for many conditions affecting your dog’s joints including hip dysplasia, arthritis, and inflammatory diseases. These are also common in dogs, attacking the cartilage, muscles, and membrane linings of cartilage and joints.

These may offer your dog safe alternatives: calming inflammation as an immediate solution and helping to rebuild joint integrity as a long-range treatment. These trusted products can slow or even stop the degeneration of the hip joint. In many cases, hip replacement surgery which is the last resort may be prevented altogether. For over 30 years, Winston’s formulas have helped thousands of dogs from all over the world.

2) Schedule a visit with your veterinarian

If your dog is clearly in pain, schedule a visit with your veterinarian. An X-ray examination will be recommended as a first step.

3) Monitor your dog’s weight

Obesity makes hip dysplasia worse. If your dog becomes less active, weight gain may become a challenge. Eliminate treats, and if possible, offer your dog low-impact exercises like stretching and swimming.

4) Remove unnecessary physical stressors from your dog’s life

5) Replace stairs with a ramp

While your dog is recovering, this prevents further damage to the damaged hip.

6) Provide a padded dog bed

Sleeping on a hard surface may increase the inflammation associated with hip dysplasia. A gel bed, which actually contains a soft jelly that conforms to your dog’s body, relieves pressure from sore joints.

7) Experiment with low-heat heating pads or fleece-covered hot water bottles

Together with gentle massages, these ways relax your dog and provide comfort during the healing process.

Is Your Dog Experiencing Hip Dysplasia or Other Forms of Pain? We Can Help

Does your dog have trouble walking, standing, or getting up? There is an excellent chance we can help your dog.

Since 1990, Winston’s Joint System and Winston’s Pain Formula have helped heal over twenty thousand dogs from all over the world. Our staff specializes in hip dysplasia, arthritis, and all joint pain & mobility issues.

To start your dog’s pain-free life, please contact us at www.dogshealth.com or call our toll-free number at 888-901-5557.

 

Hip Dysplasia in Border Collies

Border Collies are a breed of dog known for their very active lifestyle. Sadly, hip dysplasia is not a rare occurrence. The more you know about this disease, the better you will be prepared to watch your pet for any signs of this debilitating disease.

Hip Dysplasia in Border Collies – What Is It?

Hip dysplasia is a degenerative condition, which can affect any dog. Although the causes may vary, the effects are always the same: loss of mobility, increasing pain, impaired gait, and even behavioral and mood changes in your dog (including snappishness and depression).

What Are the Signs of Hip Dysplasia in Border Collies?

  • Hobbles, or walks/trots with an irregular gait
  • Tries to keep weight off one of the rear legs
  • Starts to slow down or limp on a favorite walk or run
  • Stays in bed instead of playing outdoors
  • Whimpers or yelps when climbing stairs
  • Flinches when the hip area or lower back are touched

What Happens in Hip Dysplasia – Why Does It Hurt?

Dysplasia is simply the dislocation of a bone from its proper place. “Plasia” is the Greek word for molding, so it’s easy to visualize an architectural form, like a beam or column, separating from its stabilizing molding.  Hip dysplasia or displacement is one of the best-known types of dysplasia in dogs.

The degenerative process of hip dysplasia is gradual. The onset of symptoms, specifically pain, is also somewhat gradual taking place over the course of years. In simple terms, the two bones of the hip joint shift out of alignment. The structure of a dog’s hip bones is similar to our human hip formation, consisting of a precisely fitted ball-and-socket joint. This is called a “spheroidal” joint, referring to the spherical head of the distal or articulating bone, which fit into the cup-like cavity of the accompanying bone.

Perhaps because they are such hand-working structures, the ball and socket joints are prone to disease, and simple mechanical wear and damage over time.

Here’s what we’ve learned so far:

  • Hip dysplasia results in several symptoms which reduce mobility and cause pain.
  • The muscles and joints become lax, and the joint capsule, a strong band of connective tissue which circled the bones for added stability, loses its elastic strength.
  • As this happens, the articular (working) surfaces of the two bones lose contact with each other. The bones slowly separate as the soft tissues around the joint degenerate. The disease may affect one or both right and left hips.

With the loss of protective scaffolding between the bone surfaces, the nerves in the bone endings themselves become exposed. When bone touches bone, there is acute pain. In addition, the loss of tensile strength of the supporting tendons, muscle, and cartilage means that other structures in the hip and leg must compensate in terms of weight-bearing and movement. This unnatural compensation may cause fatigue and pain. It may even cause the dog to injure itself—running to catch a Frisbee, or climbing stairs, for instance.

What Causes Hip Dysplasia?

Experts disagree as to the source of hip dysplasia in dogs.

  • Too much food

    One theory is that feeding a young, growing dog too many calories early in its development contributes to the disorder.

  • Too much exercise

    Another theory is that too much exercise, or the wrong kind of exercise, or simply too much high-impact exercise, such as fetching, jumping, and catching a ball or Frisbee on concrete, contributes to hip dysplasia.

A factual observation about this condition is that hip dysplasia tends to affect large breeds more so than smaller dogs. This, too, is relative—it is possible for small dogs to become affected by hip dysplasia, too.  However, we correctly associate the condition most frequently with big breeds.

These breeds do carry a genetic predisposition toward the condition. It is also true that purebreds, especially large dogs, are most likely to become vulnerable to hip dysplasia, therefore calling upon informed and responsible breeding practices.

What You Can Do to Improve Your Dog’s Quality of Life

Our first instinct as dog lovers is to stop the pain. Sometimes our decision-making process is clouded by emotion—guilt, fear, even panic when we see our beloved canine companion suffering. Many conventional treatments for hip dysplasia in dogs have side effects, or simply don’t work.

1) Try Winston’s Joint System and Winston’s Pain Formula

A naturopathic doctor developed Winston’s Joint System and Winston’s Pain Formula. These offer support and relief for many conditions affecting your dog’s joints including hip dysplasia, arthritis, and inflammatory diseases. These are also common in dogs, attacking the cartilage, muscles, and membrane linings of cartilage and joints.

These may offer your dog safe alternatives: calming inflammation as an immediate solution and helping to rebuild joint integrity as a long-range treatment. These trusted products can slow or even stop the degeneration of the hip joint. In many cases, hip replacement surgery which is the last resort may be prevented altogether. For over 30 years, Winston’s formulas have helped thousands of dogs from all over the world.

2) Schedule a visit with your veterinarian

If your dog is clearly in pain, schedule a visit with your veterinarian. An X-ray examination will be recommended as a first step.

3) Monitor your dog’s weight

Obesity makes hip dysplasia worse. If your dog becomes less active, weight gain may become a challenge. Eliminate treats, and if possible, offer your dog low-impact exercises like stretching and swimming.

4) Remove unnecessary physical stressors from your dog’s life

5) Replace stairs with a ramp

While your dog is recovering, this prevents further damage to the damaged hip.

6) Provide a padded dog bed

Sleeping on a hard surface may increase the inflammation associated with hip dysplasia. A gel bed, which actually contains a soft jelly that conforms to your dog’s body, relieves pressure from sore joints.

7) Experiment with low-heat heating pads or fleece-covered hot water bottles

Together with gentle massages, these ways relax your dog and provide comfort during the healing process.

Is Your Dog Experiencing Hip Dysplasia or Other Forms of Pain?

We Can Help.

Does your dog have trouble walking, standing, or getting up? There is an excellent chance we can help your dog.

Since 1990, Winston’s Joint System and Winston’s Pain Formula have helped heal over twenty thousand dogs from all over the world. Our staff specializes in hip dysplasia, arthritis, and all joint pain & mobility issues.

To start your dog’s pain-free life, please contact us at www.dogshealth.com or call our toll-free number at 888-901-5557.

Hip Dysplasia in Basset Hounds

People usually never think about the problem of hip dysplasia in Basset Hounds because a common misconception is that smaller dogs never suffer from hip dysplasia. Unfortunately, this is not true.

HIP DYSPLASIA IN BASSET HOUNDS – WHAT IS IT?

Hip dysplasia is a degenerative condition, which can affect any dog. Although the causes may vary, the effects are always the same: loss of mobility, increasing pain, impaired gait, even behavioral and mood-changes in your dog, including snappishness and depression.

WHAT ARE THE SIGNS OF HIP DYSPLASIA?

  • Hobbles, or walks/trots with an irregular gait
  • Tries to keep weight off one of the rear legs
  • Starts to slow down or limp on a favorite walk or run
  • Stays in bed instead of playing outdoors
  • Whimpers or yelps when climbing stairs
  • Flinches when hip area or lower back are touched

WHAT HAPPENS IN HIP DYSPLASIA – WHY DOES IT HURT?

Dysplasia is simply the dislocation of a bone from its proper place. “Plasia” is the Greek word for molding, so it’s easy to visualize an architectural form, like a beam or column, separating from its stabilizing molding.  Hip dysplasia or displacement is one of the best-known types of dysplasia in dogs.

The degenerative process of hip dysplasia is gradual, and so the onset of symptoms—the pain, specifically—also is somewhat gradual, taking place over the course of years. In simple terms, the two bones of the hip joint shift out of alignment. The structure of a dog’s hip bones is similar to our human hip formation, consisting of a precisely fitted ball-and-socket joint. This is called a “spheroidal” joint, referring to the spherical head of the distal or articulating bone, which fits into the cup-like cavity of the accompanying bone.

Perhaps because they are such hand-working structures, the ball and socket joints are prone to disease, and to simple mechanical wear and damage over time. Winston’s Joint System and Winston’s Pain Formula, two products for dogs developed by a naturopathic doctor, offer support and relief for many conditions affecting the joints, including hip dysplasia and osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory diseases which also are common in dogs, attacking the cartilage, muscles and membrane linings of cartilage and joints.


 

HERE’S THE BREAKDOWN:

  • Hip dysplasia results in several symptoms which reduce mobility and cause pain:
  • The muscles and joints become lax, and the joint capsule, a strong band of connective tissue which circled the bones for added stability, loses its elastic strength.
  • As this happens, the articular (working) surfaces of the two bones lose contact with each other. The bones slowly separate as the soft tissues around the joint degenerate. The disease may affect both hips, or only the right or left.

WHAT CAUSES HIP DYSPLASIA?

Experts disagree as to the source of hip dysplasia in dogs.

  • TOO MUCH FOOD? One theory is that feeding a young, growing dog too many calories early in its development contributes to the disorder.
  • TOO MUCH EXERCISE? Another theory is that too much exercise, or the wrong kind of exercise, or simply too much high-impact exercise, such as fetching, jumping and catching a ball or Frisbee on concrete, contributes to hip dysplasia.

These theories are not conclusive, though of course appropriate nutrition and training are essential to the health and well-being of any pet.

A factual observation about this condition is that hip dysplasia tends to affect large breeds more so than smaller dogs. This, too, is relative—it is possible for small dogs to become affected by hip dysplasia, too.  However, we correctly associate the condition most frequently with big breeds.

These breeds do carry a genetic predisposition toward the condition. It is also true that purebreds, especially in these large dogs, are most likely to become vulnerable to hip dysplasia, therefore calling upon informed and responsible breeding practices.

WHAT YOU CAN DO:

Our first instinct as dog-lovers is to stop the pain. Sometimes our decision-making process is clouded by emotion—guilt, fear, even panic when we see our beloved canine companion suffering. Many conventional treatments for hip dysplasia in dogs have side-effects, or simply don’t work.

  • If your dog is clearly in pain, schedule a visit with your veterinarian. An X-ray examination will be recommended as a first step.
  • Monitor your dog’s weight. Obesity makes hip dysplasia worse. If your dog becomes less active, weight-gain may become a challenge. Eliminate treats, and if possible, offer your dog low-impact exercise like stretching and swimming.
  • Remove unnecessary physical stressors from your dog’s life.
  • Replace stairs with a ramp while your dog is recovering, to prevent further damage to the damaged hip.
  • Provide a padded dog-bed—sleeping on hard surface may increase the inflammation associated with hip dysplasia. A gel-bed, which actually contains a soft jelly that conforms to your dog’s body, relieves pressure from sore joints.
  • Experiment with low-heat heating pads or fleece-covered hot water bottle, as well as gentle massage, as ways to relax your dog and provide comfort during the healing process.

Since 1990, Winston’s Joint System and Winston’s Pain Formula have helped heal over twenty thousand dogs from all over the world. Our staff specializes in hip dysplasia, arthritis and all joint, pain and mobility issues.

There is an excellent chance we can help your dog, so please contact us at: www.dogshealth.com or call our toll free number at 888-901-5557.

Does Your Dog Have Trouble:

  • Walking?
  • Standing?
  • Getting up?

 

Hip Dysplasia in Great Pyrenees

Hip dysplasia in Great Pyrenees is a genetic disease that can cause an afflicted dog to walk or run with an altered gait.

HIP DYSPLASIA IN GREAT PYRENEES – WHAT IS IT?

Hip dysplasia is a degenerative condition, which can affect any dog. Although the causes may vary, the effects are always the same: loss of mobility, increasing pain, impaired gait, even behavioral and mood-changes in your dog, including snappishness and depression.

WHAT ARE THE SIGNS OF HIP DYSPLASIA?

  • Hobbles, or walks/trots with an irregular gait
  • Tries to keep weight off one of the rear legs
  • Starts to slow down or limp on a favorite walk or run
  • Stays in bed instead of playing outdoors
  • Whimpers or yelps when climbing stairs
  • Flinches when hip area or lower back are touched

WHAT HAPPENS IN HIP DYSPLASIA – WHY DOES IT HURT?

Dysplasia is simply the dislocation of a bone from its proper place. “Plasia” is the Greek word for molding, so it’s easy to visualize an architectural form, like a beam or column, separating from its stabilizing molding.  Hip dysplasia or displacement is one of the best-known types of dysplasia in dogs.

The degenerative process of hip dysplasia is gradual, and so the onset of symptoms—the pain, specifically—also is somewhat gradual, taking place over the course of years. In simple terms, the two bones of the hip joint shift out of alignment. The structure of a dog’s hip bones is similar to our human hip formation, consisting of a precisely fitted ball-and-socket joint. This is called a “spheroidal” joint, referring to the spherical head of the distal or articulating bone, which fits into the cup-like cavity of the accompanying bone.

Perhaps because they are such hand-working structures, the ball and socket joints are prone to disease, and to simple mechanical wear and damage over time. Winston’s Joint System and Winston’s Pain Formula, two products for dogs developed by a naturopathic doctor, offer support and relief for many conditions affecting the joints, including hip dysplasia and osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory diseases which also are common in dogs, attacking the cartilage, muscles and membrane linings of cartilage and joints.


 

HERE’S THE BREAKDOWN:

  • Hip dysplasia results in several symptoms which reduce mobility and cause pain:
  • The muscles and joints become lax, and the joint capsule, a strong band of connective tissue which circled the bones for added stability, loses its elastic strength.
  • As this happens, the articular (working) surfaces of the two bones lose contact with each other. The bones slowly separate as the soft tissues around the joint degenerate. The disease may affect both hips, or only the right or left.

WHAT CAUSES HIP DYSPLASIA?

Experts disagree as to the source of hip dysplasia in dogs.

  • TOO MUCH FOOD? One theory is that feeding a young, growing dog too many calories early in its development contributes to the disorder.
  • TOO MUCH EXERCISE? Another theory is that too much exercise, or the wrong kind of exercise, or simply too much high-impact exercise, such as fetching, jumping and catching a ball or Frisbee on concrete, contributes to hip dysplasia.

These theories are not conclusive, though of course appropriate nutrition and training are essential to the health and well-being of any pet.

A factual observation about this condition is that hip dysplasia tends to affect large breeds more so than smaller dogs. This, too, is relative—it is possible for small dogs to become affected by hip dysplasia, too.  However, we correctly associate the condition most frequently with big breeds.

These breeds do carry a genetic predisposition toward the condition. It is also true that purebreds, especially in these large dogs, are most likely to become vulnerable to hip dysplasia, therefore calling upon informed and responsible breeding practices.

But here’s the thing: many of us fall in love at the animal shelter. We may generously rescue a dog whose history is entirely unknown. A darling “Shepherd mix” from the pound may represent a complex genetic history, a history to which we have no access. Medical problems may indeed manifest down the line, and hip dysplasia could be one of these. This condition is common, and is not a death-sentence. Winston’s Joint System and Winston’s Pain Formula (www.dogshealth.com) offer a holistic, gentle and effective way to manage your dog’s hip dysplasia, from the first signs of stiffness, discomfort or loss of mobility.

 WHAT YOU CAN DO:

Our first instinct as dog-lovers is to stop the pain. Sometimes our decision-making process is clouded by emotion—guilt, fear, even panic when we see our beloved canine companion suffering. Many conventional treatments for hip dysplasia in dogs have side-effects, or simply don’t work.

  • If your dog is clearly in pain, schedule a visit with your veterinarian. An X-ray examination will be recommended as a first step.
  • Monitor your dog’s weight. Obesity makes hip dysplasia worse. If your dog becomes less active, weight-gain may become a challenge. Eliminate treats, and if possible, offer your dog low-impact exercise like stretching and swimming.
  • Remove unnecessary physical stressors from your dog’s life.
  • Replace stairs with a ramp while your dog is recovering, to prevent further damage to the damaged hip.
  • Provide a padded dog-bed—sleeping on hard surface may increase the inflammation associated with hip dysplasia. A gel-bed, which actually contains a soft jelly that conforms to your dog’s body, relieves pressure from sore joints.
  • Experiment with low-heat heating pads or fleece-covered hot water bottle, as well as gentle massage, as ways to relax your dog and provide comfort during the healing process.

Since 1990, Winston’s Joint System and Winston’s Pain Formula have helped heal over twenty thousand dogs from all over the world. Our staff specializes in hip dysplasia, arthritis and all joint, pain and mobility issues.

There is an excellent chance we can help your dog, so please contact us at: www.dogshealth.com or call our toll free number at 888-901-5557.

Does Your Dog Have Trouble:

  • Walking?
  • Standing?
  • Getting up?

 

Hip Dysplasia in Beagles

Hip dysplasia is a genetic disease that can affect medium-sized dogs like Beagles.

HIP DYSPLASIA IN BEAGLES – WHAT IS IT?

Hip dysplasia is a degenerative condition, which can affect any dog. Although the causes may vary, the effects are always the same: loss of mobility, increasing pain, impaired gait, even behavioral and mood-changes in your dog, including snappishness and depression.

SIGNS THAT YOUR DOG MAY HAVE HIP DYSPLASIA:

  • Hobbles, or walks/trots with an irregular gait
  • Tries to keep weight off one of the rear legs
  • Starts to slow down or limp on a favorite walk or run
  • Stays in bed instead of playing outdoors
  • Whimpers or yelps when climbing stairs
  • Flinches when hip area or lower back are touched

WHAT HAPPENS IN HIP DYSPLASIA – WHY DOES IT HURT?

Dysplasia is simply the dislocation of a bone from its proper place. “Plasia” is the Greek word for molding, so it’s easy to visualize an architectural form, like a beam or column, separating from its stabilizing molding.  Hip dysplasia or displacement is one of the best-known types of dysplasia in dogs.

The degenerative process of hip dysplasia is gradual, and so the onset of symptoms—the pain, specifically—also is somewhat gradual, taking place over the course of years. In simple terms, the two bones of the hip joint shift out of alignment. The structure of a dog’s hip bones is similar to our human hip formation, consisting of a precisely fitted ball-and-socket joint. This is called a “spheroidal” joint, referring to the spherical head of the distal or articulating bone, which fits into the cup-like cavity of the accompanying bone.

Perhaps because they are such hand-working structures, the ball and socket joints are prone to disease, and to simple mechanical wear and damage over time. Winston’s Joint System and Winston’s Pain Formula, two products for dogs developed by a naturopathic doctor, offer support and relief for many conditions affecting the joints, including hip dysplasia and osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory diseases which also are common in dogs, attacking the cartilage, muscles and membrane linings of cartilage and joints.


 

HERE’S THE BREAKDOWN:

  • Hip dysplasia results in several symptoms which reduce mobility and cause pain:
  • The muscles and joints become lax, and the joint capsule, a strong band of connective tissue which circled the bones for added stability, loses its elastic strength.
  • As this happens, the articular (working) surfaces of the two bones lose contact with each other. The bones slowly separate as the soft tissues around the joint degenerate. The disease may affect both hips, or only the right or left.

WHAT CAUSES HIP DYSPLASIA?

Experts disagree as to the source of hip dysplasia in dogs.

  • TOO MUCH FOOD? One theory is that feeding a young, growing dog too many calories early in its development contributes to the disorder.
  • TOO MUCH EXERCISE? Another theory is that too much exercise, or the wrong kind of exercise, or simply too much high-impact exercise, such as fetching, jumping and catching a ball or Frisbee on concrete, contributes to hip dysplasia.

These theories are not conclusive, though of course appropriate nutrition and training are essential to the health and well-being of any pet.

A factual observation about this condition is that hip dysplasia tends to affect large breeds more so than smaller dogs. This, too, is relative—it is possible for small dogs to become affected by hip dysplasia, too.  However, we correctly associate the condition most frequently with big breeds.

These breeds do carry a genetic predisposition toward the condition. It is also true that purebreds, especially in these large dogs, are most likely to become vulnerable to hip dysplasia, therefore calling upon informed and responsible breeding practices.

WHAT YOU CAN DO:

Our first instinct as dog-lovers is to stop the pain. Sometimes our decision-making process is clouded by emotion—guilt, fear, even panic when we see our beloved canine companion suffering. Many conventional treatments for hip dysplasia in dogs have side-effects, or simply don’t work.

  • If your dog is clearly in pain, schedule a visit with your veterinarian. An X-ray examination will be recommended as a first step.
  • Monitor your dog’s weight. Obesity makes hip dysplasia worse. If your dog becomes less active, weight-gain may become a challenge. Eliminate treats, and if possible, offer your dog low-impact exercise like stretching and swimming.
  • Remove unnecessary physical stressors from your dog’s life.
  • Replace stairs with a ramp while your dog is recovering, to prevent further damage to the damaged hip.
  • Provide a padded dog-bed—sleeping on hard surface may increase the inflammation associated with hip dysplasia. A gel-bed, which actually contains a soft jelly that conforms to your dog’s body, relieves pressure from sore joints.
  • Experiment with low-heat heating pads or fleece-covered hot water bottle, as well as gentle massage, as ways to relax your dog and provide comfort during the healing process.

Since 1990, Winston’s Joint System and Winston’s Pain Formula have helped heal over twenty thousand dogs from all over the world. Our staff specializes in hip dysplasia, arthritis and all joint, pain and mobility issues.

There is an excellent chance we can help your dog, so please contact us at: www.dogshealth.com or call our toll free number at 888-901-5557.

Does Your Dog Have Trouble:

  • Walking?
  • Standing?
  • Getting up?

 

Why Spay or Neuter Your Dog?

The reasons for choosing to spay or neuter your dog are to keep it from getting pregnant or impregnating another dog. Females get the spay surgery, which removes the ovaries and uterus, while a neuter surgery removes a male dog’s testicles.

These surgeries offer many health benefits and result in better behavior in your pet. Spaying is especially important if you don’t want to suddenly find yourself with a litter of puppies who need homes. These common sterilization surgeries will not change your dog’s temperament. Your dog will be just as playful, friendly, happy, affectionate and gentle as he or she was before undergoing the painless surgery.

Spaying and Neutering has many benefits. Other than simply preventing unwanted puppies, these surgeries could save your dog’s life.

Female Dogs:
A female who is spayed before her first heat has almost a zero chance of getting mammary gland cancer. After she experiences her first heat, the chance of developing mammary gland cancer drops to 7 percent and then to 25 percent after the second heat.

Spaying also prevents a common, life-threatening infection of the uterus called Pyometra. Usually middle-aged or older female dogs s will develop this infection about six weeks after a heat cycle. Should this happen, an emergency spay becomes a life-saving necessity.

One myth that needs to be put to rest is that spaying will cause your dog to enter into menopause. Dogs don’t ever go into menopause.

Male Dogs:
A male who is neutered has the benefit of prevention of some cancers of the testicles and anus. Neutering will also help prevent major prostate problems in males.

After neutering, male puppies change from young delinquents into well-behaved canines. With less testosterone hyping their little bodies, they become less aggressive and less likely to wander off searching for females in heat. They also become less likely to hump you or your visitors and are less likely to mark their spot on every bush and pole they come upon. They will still exhibit some of this behavior, but less of it.

Puppies can be spayed or neutered any time after they reach eight weeks of age. It is also perfectly safe to wait until just before your dog becomes sexually mature before having the surgery performed. Sexual maturity usually occurs around six months of age, depending on the breed.

Things to consider if you plan to spay or neuter your dog:
• Surgery is safer when your dog is young;
• Younger dogs have immature immune systems, which can become a problem if infections develop after surgery;
• If you want your male dog to be big and as masculine as possible, wait a little longer to neuter him. Otherwise have him neutered earlier;
• Females will also have a slightly more feminine look if spayed later.

There are already too many unwanted pets in the world; please spay or neuter your dog and don’t inadvertently add to the unwanted and unloved canine population.

Since 1990, Winston’s Joint System and Winston’s Pain Formula have helped heal over twenty thousand dogs from all over the world. Our staff specializes in hip dysplasia, arthritis and all joint, pain and mobility issues.

There is an excellent chance we can help your dog, so please contact us at: www.dogshealth.com or call our toll free number at 888-901-5557.

Does Your Dog Have Trouble:

  • Walking?
  • Standing?
  • Getting up?

 

Help With Vet Bills

In these difficult economic times many dog owners are finding that they sometimes need help paying vet bills. Fortunately, there are programs and organizations willing to help with vet bills when money is tight.

If you need spay and neuter services for your dog, most ASPCA branches often sponsor low cost spay and neuter clinics.

Many vaccination clinics set up special events during the year and offer free or inexpensive vaccines for your dog. Vaccines usually dispensed at these events include Rabies, Corona, Distemper, Hepatitis, Parvovirus, and Leptospirosis. Heartworm and parasite testing is sometimes offered free of charge also.

If your dog needs medical treatment or emergency care and you’re unable to afford such care, there are charitable organizations across the country who work with caring veterinarians to provide medical care for dogs who would otherwise go untreated.

These organizations include the following:
The American Animal Hospital Association is a companion animal veterinary association. They have a foundation called Helping Pets Fund that gives aid to sick and injured pets.

United Animal Nations which provides assistance to animal rescue organizations and helps victims of disasters, domestic violence and foreclosures to care for their pets.

Help-A-Pet assists physically and mentally challenged individuals, senior citizens and children of the working poor to provide their pets with lifesaving veterinary care.

Labrador Life Line helps individuals and rescuers care for Labrador Retrievers by providing medical assistance, supplies and transportation to foster homes and permanent homes.

The Pet Fund provides financial assistance to pet owners to help pay for medical and preventive care of a dog. The Fund also works to decrease the number of animals that end up being euthanized or surrendered to animal shelters due to preventable or treatable illnesses.

Another source of help is one of the many community food banks that accept and distribute pet food to help owners feed their pets. Local humane societies sometimes are able to provide a list of sources for low-cost or no-cost pet food.

Getting help with vet bills when you truly need it should never, and I mean never, cause you to be embarrassed. Think first of your loving companion and not your pride. Your dog needs you. You are its reason for living.

Since 1990, Winston’s Joint System and Winston’s Pain Formula have helped heal over twenty thousand dogs from all over the world. Our staff specializes in hip dysplasia, arthritis and all joint, pain and mobility issues.

There is an excellent chance we can help your dog, so please contact us at: www.dogshealth.com or call our toll free number at 888-901-5557.

Does Your Dog Have Trouble:

  • Walking?
  • Standing?
  • Getting up?

 

Dog Myths and Facts

Dog care advice comes from many different sources, and therein lies the reason dog owners can be confused when it comes to dog myths and facts.

Here are some of the most common myths about dogs:

(1) Dogs Eat Grass When They Feel Sick
One of the oldest dog myths is that dogs eat grass when they feel sick to their stomachs, because it makes them vomit so they feel better. Eating grass can make your dog vomit but not because the grass itself sickens them but because the rough blades of grass often irritate a dog’s stomach lining. Most veterinarians, when asked about this myth, will tell you they believe that dogs eat grass simply because they like it.

(2) Mixed Breeds Are More Healthy Overall Than Purebreds
It is true that some breeds of dog are prone to specific diseases but it’s not true that mixed breed dogs are any healthier and heartier than purebred dogs. Mixed breed dogs are at risk of acquiring every inherited illness common in their genetic background. Owners of mixed breeds usually don’t know exactly what the genetic makeup is for their mixed breed, other than guessing their dog is part this breed and part that breed, when in fact, the dog might be a genetic mix of several breeds. This can put a mixed breed dog at a greater risk of developing genetic illnesses. The only way to be sure a dog won’t develop an inherited genetic illness is to adopt your pet from a reputable breeder who has screened the parents – and sometimes the grandparents – of a dog for any hereditary illnesses before they are bred.

(3) Dogs Eat Their Feces Because They Lack Certain Nutrients
Many dogs like to eat feces. There may be a medical reason for this but it’s usually just normal dog behavior. A dog might eat feces because it learned this behavior when it was young; it likes the taste (yes, I know you’re saying ‘ugh’ right now); it is seeking attention it’s not getting from you; or it gets very hungry between meals. You needn’t freak out if your dog occasionally eats its feces. Just be sure to clean up after your dog before it has a chance to eat it.

(4) Dogs Heal Themselves by Licking Their Wounds
It is true that dogs keep their wounds clean by licking them and this can speed up the healing process. But excessive licking of a wound is not good. It can easily promote more damage to the dog’s wounded tissues, which in turn may result in bacterial infection. If your dog starts licking a wound excessively, try to stop the behavior by focusing the dog’s attention on something else.

(5) A Dog’s Nose Should Be Cold and Wet
Most of the time, your dog’s nose will be cold and wet. On occasion it may suddenly become warm and dry. A dog’s nose will stay cold and wet because they tend to lick them a lot. A cold, wet nose is not an indicator of good health. You do need to watch for a runny nose or any discharge from the dog’s nasal passages which can indicate illness. Other than that, don’t worry about whether your dog’s nose is cold and wet or warmer and drier.

Before you boldly accept that something you heard or read about dogs is true, research it to see if it is really a dog myth or a dog fact!

Since 1990, Winston’s Joint System and Winston’s Pain Formula have helped heal over twenty thousand dogs from all over the world. Our staff specializes in hip dysplasia, arthritis and all joint, pain and mobility issues.

There is an excellent chance we can help your dog, so please contact us at: www.dogshealth.com or call our toll free number at 888-901-5557.

Does Your Dog Have Trouble:

  • Walking?
  • Standing?
  • Getting up?

 

Side Effects of Rimadyl in Dogs

 

In the past you may have seen television commercials showing previously lame dogs jumping and running about like young puppies. These commercials were promoting Rimadyl, a drug introduced in 1997 by Pfizer Chemical for the treatment of hip dysplasia and arthritis in dogs. What the commercials carefully avoided was any mention of the side effects of Rimadyl in dogs.

Today it’s no longer possible to see those commercials because the advertising was halted by Pfizer for good reasons.

As a dog owner, we are indebted to dogs like Montana, a six-year-old Siberian husky who had stiff legs. Montana was prescribed Rimadyl by his veterinarian and at first the drug appeared to work well.

But then Montana lost his appetite, wobbled when he walked, and finally was unable to walk at all. He began vomiting and had seizures; eventually his owner was forced to put him to sleep. An autopsy was performed which showed the presence of liver damage that could only be associated with a harmful drug reaction.

Drugs for pets are big business in the United States, as well as in many other countries where pet animals are valued. It is estimated that world-wide, the sale of these drugs total more than 3-1/2 Billion dollars annually. Rimadyl is one of the bestselling drugs included in this estimate.

Rimadyl has been prescribed for more than four million dogs in the United States alone, and has earned Pfizer tens of millions of dollars.

After introducing the drug, the company ran full-page magazine ads and a public-relations campaign that resulted in 1,785 print stories, 856 radio reports and more than 200 television news reports of the benefits of Rimadyl.

What dog owner whose beloved pet was suffering from arthritis or hip dysplasia wouldn’t want such a “miracle drug” for their pet?

But Rimadyl has also resulted in many debates and intense arguments between veterinarians and pet owners who were furious that they were not warned of the risks of giving their pets Rimadyl.

After Montana’s owner contacted Pfizer and the Food and Drug Administration to complain about the early and untimely death of her dog, Pfizer offered to pay her $440 in what they called “a gesture of good will.”

Today we can be thankful that Montana’s owner was insulted by Pfizer’s offer and their lawyers’ stipulation that she tell no one about the payment (or bribe as some would call it).

She refused to sign any of Pfizer’s proffered documents and would not accept any money. She felt it was an affront both to her and to the memory of Montana to absolve Pfizer of any blame.

As additional reports of serious reactions and the deaths of many dogs started pouring into the FDA, the agency recommended that Pfizer list “death” as a possible side effect in a warning letter to veterinarians and also place a warning on the drug labels.

Pfizer indicated this “would be devastating to the product” and after much stalling, eventually was forced to put the word “death” on Rimadyl’s labels and notify all veterinarians in writing.

The strongest blow to Pfizer’s inappropriate labeling and advertising was the FDA’s requirement that they mention the same warning on their television ads. When given an ultimatum about their commercials mentioning “death” or else pulling the ads, Pfizer chose to stop all television ads for Rimadyl.

Although this came too late to save the life of Montana, he and his owner should be credited with bringing pressure to bear on the FDA and Pfizer and forcing them to begin warning of the possible serious side effects of Rimadyl.

Since the introduction of Rimadyl in 1997, the FDA has received reports of more than 1,000 dogs that died or had to be put to sleep, and 7,000 more that had serious adverse reactions after taking the drug.

Despite these serious side effects, the FDA has not ordered the removal of Rimadyl from the marketplace. The FDA requires safety and efficacy testing for animal drugs just as it does for human drugs. However, animal drug tests are conducted with a much smaller number of test subjects. Pfizer used about 500 dogs in their trials of Rimadyl, which is less than one fifth the number of subjects used in most human-drug trials.

During Pfizer’s Rimadyl trials, some dogs developed unusual liver-function readings and one young beagle tested on a high dose of the drug died.

Neither the FDA or Pfizer found these effects alarming, and the drug was subsequently approved. A consumer group has mounted a campaign against Pfizer called BARKS, which stands for “Be Aware of Rimadyl’s Known Side-effects.”

Hopefully this organization will be able to influence more dog owners to carefully consider very seriously whether or not to have Rimadyl prescribed for their pet dog

Since 1990, Winston’s Joint System and Winston’s Pain Formula have helped heal over twenty thousand dogs from all over the world. Our staff specializes in hip dysplasia, arthritis and all joint, pain and mobility issues.

There is an excellent chance we can help your dog, so please contact us at: www.dogshealth.com or call our toll free number at 888-901-5557.

Does Your Dog Have Trouble:

  • Walking?
  • Standing?
  • Getting up?