Hip Dysplasia in Irish Setters

Hip Dysplasia in Irish Setters would seem to be an anomaly given their boisterous and energetic demeanor.

They want to be involved in everything you do and everywhere you go, whether indoors or out. They are known for being good-natured and friendly with children.

Irish Setters

Irish Setters will form a strong bond with their owners but they are also gentle and accepting of just about everyone, including other pets.

They do have a loud bark, but they cannot be considered watchdogs or guard dogs. Strangers who come to your house will most likely be looked upon as new playmates by your companion.

Irish Setters were originally bred for hunting in the fields and are full of energy, swiftness and endurance.

If you like to jog, run, or bicycle, your Irish Setter will be happy to accompany you for as long as you wish. Your energy is likely to give out before theirs.

They have a rambunctious personality that’s almost puppy-like, so they will benefit greatly from strong, positive training. They love having a big back yard to play in and need healthy doses of exercise and attention; but they don’t like to be left alone for long periods of time.

Irish Setters were bred by mixing Irish Terriers, Irish Water Spaniels and English Setters to be the ideal birding dog. In the early 1800s, the solid-red Irish setter became the commonly accepted type for the breed.

With the instincts of a great hunter, the magnificence of a show dog and a charming personality, the Irish Setter is one of the world’s favorite dogs.

Irish Setters have balanced and graceful bodies and silky red coats that grow long on the ears, tails and chests. Their lean heads have long muzzles, almond shaped eyes, dark noses and long, thin ears. They have elegant necks that slope down to deep chests and flat backs. Their red coats range in color from chestnut to mahogany.

Irish Setters can live as long as 15 years. Common health issues can include skin allergies, eye problems epilepsy, bloating, and hip dysplasia.

Hip Dysplasia in Irish Setters

Hip dysplasia is a genetic disease that primarily affects large and giant breeds of dogs but can also affect medium-sized breeds and occasionally small breeds. It is primarily a disease of purebreds, although it can also occur in mixed breeds.

To understand hip dysplasia in Irish Setters and the resulting arthritis, you need a basic understanding of how the dog’s hip joint is affected.

The hip joint is comprised of a ball and socket that forms the attachment of the hind leg to the body. The ball portion is the head of the femur and the socket is located on the pelvis.

In a normal hip joint the ball rotates freely within the socket. The bones are shaped to perfectly match each other with the socket surrounding the ball.

To strengthen the joint, the two bones are held together by a strong ligament. The joint capsule, a strong band of connective tissue, circles the two bones to provide added stability.

A normal hip joint:

Hip dysplasia is linked to abnormal joint structure and a laxity of the muscles, connective tissue, and ligaments that would normally support the dog’s hip joints.

As the disease progresses, the articular surfaces of the two bones lose contact with each other. This separation of the two bones within the joint causes a drastic change in the size and shape of the articular surfaces.

An abnormal hip joint:

Most Setters who eventually develop hip dysplasia are born with normal hips, but due to their genetic make-up the soft tissues surrounding the joint develop abnormally. This leads to the symptoms associated with hip dysplasia. The disease may affect both hips, or only the right or left hip.

The symptoms of hip dysplasia in Irish Setters cause afflicted dogs to walk or run with an altered gait, similar to a bunny-hop. They begin to resist any movement that requires full extension or flexion of the rear legs. They will experience stiffness and pain in their rear legs after exercising and on first rising in the morning. Climbing stairs becomes difficult if not impossible. Some dogs will limp and are less willing to participate in normal daily activities, including walks they formerly enjoyed.

It appears that the amount of calories a dog consumes, especially during its fast-growth period from three to ten months, has the biggest impact on whether or not a dog genetically prone to hip dysplasia will develop the disease.

Obesity can increase the severity of the disease in dogs that are genetically susceptible and the extra weight will intensify the degeneration of a dog’s joints and hips. Dogs who are genetically prone to hip dysplasia and also are overweight, are at a much higher risk of developing hip dysplasia and eventually osteoarthritis.

Exercise can be another risk factor. Dogs genetically susceptible to hip dysplasia may have an increased incidence of the disease if they are over-exercised at a young age. Moderate exercise like running and swimming is best for exercising young dogs.

Prevention

Because hip dysplasia in Irish Setters is primarily an inherited condition, there are no products that can prevent its development.

Through proper diet, exercise, and a daily regimen of Winston’s Joint System, you can slow, and sometimes halt, the progression of these degenerative joint diseases while providing your dog with relief from its pain. Winston’s provides many of the raw materials essential for the synthesis of the joint-lubricating synovial fluid as well as the repair of articular cartilage and connective tissue.

You might also want to consider providing your dog with an orthopedic bed which distributes the dog’s weight evenly and reduces pressure on its joints. It’s perfect for dogs with hip dysplasia or arthritis.

If owners insisted on only purchasing an animal whose parents and grandparents were certified to have good or excellent hips, and if breeders only bred these first-rate animals, then the majority of the problems caused by hip dysplasia would be eliminated.

If you are looking to purchase an Irish Setter now or in the future, the best way to lessen the possibility of getting a dog that will develop hip dysplasia is to examine the incidence of the disease in the dog’s lineage. If at all possible, try to examine the parents and grandparents as far back as three or four generations.

There are different assumptions on how to prevent the progression of hip dysplasia in Irish Setters.

Poor nutrition, inadequate or improper exercise, and increased body weight may all contribute to the severity of osteoarthritis after the hip dysplasia has developed. Watching the calories your puppy or young dog consumes and preventing obesity in your dog, allowing only non-stressful types of exercise, and a daily regimen of Winston’s Joint System, are the best things you can do for your dog.

Since 1990, Winston’s Joint System and Winston’s Pain Formula have helped heal over twenty thousand dogs from all over the world. Our staff specializes in hip dysplasia, arthritis and all joint, pain and mobility issues.

There is an excellent chance we can help your dog, so please contact us at: www.dogshealth.com or call our toll free number at 888-901-5557.

History of Rimadyl

The history of Rimadyl dates back to January of 1997 when Pfizer Pharmaceuticals first introduced the drug to veterinarians. The generic for Rimadyl, Carprofen, was marketed much later. Many dog owners whose pets suffer from arthritis or hip dysplasia believe that Rimadyl has improved the quality of their dogs’ lives. However, as a responsible dog owner, you need to be aware that there is sufficient evidence proving that Rimadyl can have very serious side effects for an animal.

Some dogs have died after being prescribed Rimadyl. Most of these cases have been attributed to the unexpected and swift onset of the well-known side effects of Rimadyl.

Labrador Retrievers, as well as their cousins, the Golden Retrievers, are more prone than most breeds to developing hip dysplasia, arthritis and other debilitating joint diseases. Pfizer first reported that Labradors were particularly at risk from Rimadyl’s toxicity. Pfizer’s report on side effects that occurred during the drug’s initial post-approval phase states, “. . . approximately one fourth of all hepatic reports were in Labrador Retrievers.”

This is an alarmingly high rate of incidence and if you are the owner of a Labrador who suffers from a debilitating joint disease and your vet has prescribed Rimadyl, you need to exercise extreme caution so you are not putting your dog’s health or its life at risk. Besides Labrador Retrievers, many breeds who have been prescribed Rimadyl have experienced side effects or death from Rimadyl.

Your veterinarian should pre-screen your dog before prescribing Rimadyl. Follow-up testing and close monitoring of the dog for possible toxic reactions is equally important.

Rimadyl or its generic Carprofen are not recommended for dogs who have bleeding disorders, liver disease, inflammatory bowel disease, or are inclined to suffer from gastrointestinal ulceration.

Rimadyl should never be given along with any other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) such as aspirin, or any corticosteroids such as prednisone, prednisolone, or dexamethasone. It is also not advisable to give the drug to pregnant or nursing female dogs because it has not been tested as being safe for the mother or the unborn puppies.

Before agreeing with your vet that Rimadyl is the best solution for your dog’s joint problems, discuss the benefits of the drug against the risks. It has been widely reported that many veterinarians are not completely informed about the serious side-effects of Rimadyl.

If you decide your dog might benefit from Rimadyl and you believe that it’s worth the risks involved, ask your veterinarian to start by prescribing the lowest possible dosage that can be used to obtain relief, and then increase the dosage if necessary. The recommended dosage is one mg per pound of a dog’s weight, given twice a day. It’s possible that your dog may obtain relief at a lower dosage which might possibly help in avoiding toxicity. Some vets recommend that Rimadyl be used only for a period of several weeks, followed by several weeks off the drug to give the dog’s liver time to recover from the toxic effects of the drug.

As soon as your dog begins taking Rimadyl you need to carefully watch for the following symptoms which are signs of potential life-threatening reactions to the drug:

• loss of appetite
• refusal to drink water or an increased thirst
• vomiting – occasionally with flecks of blood in the vomit
• diarrhea
• black, tarry stools
• lethargy or unusual drowsiness
• hyperactivity or constant restlessness
• sudden aggressiveness when none was evident before
• weakness or partial paralysis
• seizures or loss of balance

If any of these symptoms occur, IMMEDIATELY STOP giving your pet the drug and take it to the vet. The earlier you discover the problem, the better the chances your dog will have a complete recovery.

Is Rimadyl a “miracle drug” for dogs or are the potential side effects too dangerous? The history of Rimadyl has been plagued with several serious problems; (1) a lack of adequate warnings about the potential serious and deadly side effects of the drug, (2) the large and unacceptable number of veterinarians who are unaware of Rimadyl’s serious side effects, and (3) the severity and sometimes sudden onset of the side effects which can result in the death of the dog being given Rimadyl.

A safer and more effective treatment for arthritis and hip dysplasia is Winston’s Joint System, an all-natural formula developed by a Naturopathic Doctor to heal his own beloved dog. For over 20 years, this long-proven formula has been providing relief from the pain and stiffness of arthritis and hip dysplasia to all breeds and ages of dogs.

If your pet suffers from any of the following joint problems, you should place it on a daily regimen of Winston’s Joint System to give welcome relief from its pain:

* Hip Dysplasia
* Arthritis
* Osteochondritis (OCD)
* Stiffness/Inflammation
* Ligament Tears
* Growing Pains
* Mobility Problems
* Joint Pains

With the information presented here, and a consultation with your vet, you should be able to decide whether the risks of administering Rimadyl are worth the possible benefits. For myself, I’d rather be safe using Winston’s Joint System than be sorry and endanger my loving dog’s health or even worse, contribute to its death.

Hip Dysplasia in Akitas

Hip dysplasia in Akitas is a common health issue. As an Akita ages it’s important to watch for any symptoms of hip dysplasia or arthritis. An early diagnosis and treatment will do wonders for your loving pet.

The Akitas

Akitas have a reputation for being aggressive hunters in the wild, yet as home pets they are tame and gentle, adapting easily to a quiet family life.

That doesn’t necessarily mean they’ll cuddle up on the sofa and watch TV with you; their instinctive nature tends to keep them alert and responsive to any possible danger.

Who hasn’t loved Hachiko, the Akita from the 2009 movie “Hachi: A Dog’s Tale“? Akitas make loving, faithful, dependable companions and they get along very well with children.

They can be a little aloof with people they don’t know, but they eventually warm up to new people and situations. They don’t bark a lot which is good for apartment dwellers, but they’re very intelligent and responsive, making them first-rate guard dogs.

Think of them as tough, smart and loyal companions.

Akitas are made for outdoor sports whether it’s hiking, hunting, playing games, or jumping in rivers and lakes. They have weatherproof coats that keep them warm in cold temperatures.

An Akita needs ample daily exercise to maintain its physical health and sharp mind. Akitas who live in urban dwellings need a vigorous walk or jog every day, while those who live in a rural setting will do well with daily runs around the property.

In addition to their boundless physical strength, Akitas also have dominant personalities and need an owner who can devote the time and patience to train them properly.

Akitas have large, sturdy frames covered in thick, water-resistant coats that shed a lot in the spring and fall. Daily brushing becomes a must.

They have broad heads with short muzzles, black noses and pointed ears that face forward. Their triangular eyes are dark and deeply set. Their bodies are slightly longer than they are tall, and their thick coats come in black, gray, tan, and brown, all with white markings.

A healthy Akita can live as long as 12 years. Common health issues include immune deficiencies, eye problems, thyroid problems, and hip dysplasia.

Hip dysplasia in Akitas

Hip dysplasia is a genetic disease that primarily affects large and giant breeds of dogs but can also affect medium-sized breeds and occasionally small breeds. It is primarily a disease of purebreds, although it can also occur in mixed breeds.

To understand hip dysplasia in Akitas and the resulting arthritis, you need a basic understanding of how the dog’s hip joint is affected.

The hip joint is comprised of a ball and socket that forms the attachment of the hind leg to the body. The ball portion is the head of the femur and the socket is located on the pelvis.

In a normal hip joint the ball rotates freely within the socket. The bones are shaped to perfectly match each other with the socket surrounding the ball.

To strengthen the joint, the two bones are held together by a strong ligament. The joint capsule, a strong band of connective tissue, circles the two bones to provide added stability.

A normal hip joint:

Hip dysplasia is linked to abnormal joint structure and a laxity of the muscles, connective tissue, and ligaments that would normally support the dog’s hip joints.

As the disease progresses, the articular surfaces of the two bones lose contact with each other. This separation of the two bones within the joint causes a drastic change in the size and shape of the articular surfaces.

An abnormal hip joint:

Most Akitas who eventually develop hip dysplasia are born with normal hips, but due to their genetic make-up the soft tissues surrounding the joint develop abnormally. This leads to the symptoms associated with hip dysplasia. The disease may affect both hips, or only the right or left hip.

The symptoms of hip dysplasia cause afflicted dogs to walk or run with an altered gait, similar to a bunny-hop.

They begin to resist any movement that requires full extension or flexion of the rear legs. They will experience stiffness and pain in their rear legs after exercising and on first rising in the morning. Climbing stairs becomes difficult if not impossible. Some dogs will limp and are less willing to participate in normal daily activities, including walks they formerly enjoyed.

It appears that the amount of calories a dog consumes, especially during its fast-growth period from three to ten months, has the biggest impact on whether or not a dog genetically prone to hip dysplasia will develop the disease.

Obesity can increase the severity of the disease in dogs that are genetically susceptible and the extra weight will intensify the degeneration of a dog’s joints and hips. Dogs who are genetically prone to hip dysplasia and also are overweight, are at a much higher risk of developing hip dysplasia and eventually osteoarthritis.

Exercise can be another risk factor. Dogs genetically susceptible to hip dysplasia may have an increased incidence of the disease if they are over-exercised at a young age. Moderate exercise like running and swimming is best for exercising young dogs.

Prevention

Because hip dysplasia in Akitas is primarily an inherited condition, there are no products that can prevent its development.

Through proper diet, exercise, and a daily regimen of Winston’s Joint System, you can slow, and sometimes halt, the progression of these degenerative joint diseases while providing your dog with relief from its pain. Winston’s provides many of the raw materials essential for the synthesis of the joint-lubricating synovial fluid as well as the repair of articular cartilage and connective tissue.

There are different assumptions on how to prevent the progression of hip dysplasia.

Poor nutrition, inadequate or improper exercise, and increased body weight may all contribute to the severity of osteoarthritis after the hip dysplasia has developed.

Watching the calories your puppy or young dog consumes and preventing obesity in your dog, allowing only non-stressful types of exercise, and a daily regimen of Winston’s Joint System, are the best things you can do for your dog.

Since 1990, Winston’s Joint System and Winston’s Pain Formula have helped heal over twenty thousand dogs from all over the world. Our staff specializes in hip dysplasia, arthritis and all joint, pain and mobility issues.

There is an excellent chance we can help your dog, so please contact us at: www.dogshealth.com or call our toll free number at 888-901-5557.

Hip Dysplasia in Airedale Terriers

If you are considering the adoption of a pet dog and are leaning toward an Airedale Terrier, you need to know the facts on hip dysplasia in Airedale Terriers.

Airedale Terriers

Airedale Terriers make ideal companions for active adults and families with older children. Airedales are friendly, strong, high-energy dogs, handsome and huggable. They aren’t couch potatoes and can remain still and relaxed only for short periods of time. They have loads of energy and love to run, play, fetch and dig holes in your yard.

If you enjoy hiking, hunting, or running, your Airedale Terrier will keep pace with you the entire distance. Airedales make wonderful companions for someone who is active and enjoys exercising with a dog. They’re very responsive to obedience training but can be easily distracted by the sudden appearance of small animals such as cats or squirrels.

Airedales are dependable watchdogs, protective and loyal. They have a piercing bark and lots of acrobatic moves. As puppies they are quite rowdy but mellow some with age—but not that much. They are sweet animals and need lots of love and attention.

Airedales are courageous, intense and extremely curious about other dogs and small animals and need to be kept on a leash in public. They love daily walks and games of fetch, and they are accomplished swimmers.

A healthy Airedale Terrier can live as long as 12 years. These dogs are generally healthy, but some can develop hip dysplasia.

Airedales are named for the valley (dale) of Aire in England, and were bred from hunting and swimming terriers for the purpose of catching otters and other small animals, in addition to curbing the rat population. Airedales are often used as police and military dogs.

Airedale Terriers have large, lean and well-proportioned frames covered in bristly, wiry coats. Their long, flat heads are somewhat narrow with small, dark eyes and V-shaped ears that fold forward. They are usually groomed to have bushy, hanging ears. They have strong necks that slope down to deep chests, short backs and tails that point straight up. Their coats are usually tan with black and/or red markings.

Hip dysplasia in Airedale Terriers

Hip dysplasia is a genetic disease that primarily affects large and giant breeds of dogs but can also affect medium-sized breeds and occasionally small breeds. It is primarily a disease of purebreds, although it can also occur in mixed breeds.

To understand hip dysplasia in Airedale Terriers and the resulting arthritis, you need a basic understanding of how the dog’s hip joint is affected.

The hip joint is comprised of a ball and socket that forms the attachment of the hind leg to the body. The ball portion is the head of the femur and the socket is located on the pelvis. In a normal hip joint the ball rotates freely within the socket. The bones are shaped to perfectly match each other with the socket surrounding the ball. To strengthen the joint, the two bones are held together by a strong ligament. The joint capsule, a strong band of connective tissue, circles the two bones to provide added stability.

Hip dysplasia is linked to abnormal joint structure and a laxity of the muscles, connective tissue, and ligaments that would normally support the dog’s hip joints.

As the disease progresses, the articular surfaces of the two bones lose contact with each other. This separation of the two bones within the joint causes a drastic change in the size and shape of the articular surfaces.

This is what a normal hip joint looks like:

Most Airedales who eventually develop hip dysplasia are born with normal hips, but due to their genetic make-up the soft tissues surrounding the joint develop abnormally. This leads to the symptoms associated with hip dysplasia. The disease may affect both hips, or only the right or left hip.

This is what an abnormal hip joint looks like:

The symptoms of hip dysplasia in Airedale Terriers cause afflicted dogs to walk or run with an altered gait, similar to a bunny-hop. They begin to resist any movement that requires full extension or flexion of the rear legs. They will experience stiffness and pain in their rear legs after exercising and on first rising in the morning. Climbing stairs becomes difficult if not impossible. Some dogs will limp and are less willing to participate in normal daily activities, including walks they formerly enjoyed.

It appears that the amount of calories a dog consumes, especially during its fast-growth period from three to ten months, has the biggest impact on whether or not a dog genetically prone to hip dysplasia will develop the disease.

Obesity can increase the severity of the disease in dogs that are genetically susceptible and the extra weight will intensify the degeneration of a dog’s joints and hips. Dogs who are genetically prone to hip dysplasia and also are overweight, are at a much higher risk of developing hip dysplasia and eventually osteoarthritis.

Exercise can be another risk factor. Dogs genetically susceptible to hip dysplasia may have an increased incidence of the disease if they are over-exercised at a young age. Moderate exercise like running and swimming is best for exercising young dogs.

Prevention

Because hip dysplasia is primarily an inherited condition, there are no products that can prevent its development.

Through proper diet, exercise, and a daily regimen of Winston’s Joint System, you can slow, and sometimes halt, the progression of these degenerative joint diseases while providing your dog with relief from its pain. Winston’s provides many of the raw materials essential for the synthesis of the joint-lubricating synovial fluid as well as the repair of articular cartilage and connective tissue.

You might also want to consider providing your dog with an orthopedic bed which distributes the dog’s weight evenly and reduces pressure on its joints. It’s perfect for dogs with hip dysplasia or arthritis.

There are different assumptions on how to prevent the progression of hip dysplasia in Airedale Terriers.

Poor nutrition, inadequate or improper exercise, and increased body weight may all contribute to the severity of osteoarthritis after the hip dysplasia has developed. By watching the calories your puppy or young dog consumes and thereby preventing obesity in your dog, allowing only non-stressful types of exercise, and feeding your dog a daily regimen of Winston’s Joint System, are the best things you can do for your Airedale.

Since 1990, Winston’s Joint System and Winston’s Pain Formula have helped heal over twenty thousand dogs from all over the world. Our staff specializes in hip dysplasia, arthritis and all joint, pain and mobility issues.

There is an excellent chance we can help your dog, so please contact us at: www.dogshealth.com or call our toll free number at 888-901-5557.

Hip Dysplasia in Saint Bernards

Saint Bernard dogs are powerful, proportionately tall, strong and muscular, big boned and deep chested, and for these reasons you would think that hip dysplasia in Saint Bernards would be something extremely rare. The truth is, it’s the other way around: Joint problems are very common for dogs of this breed.

Saint Bernards

Known as the giant dogs that rescue people in the Swiss Alps, Saint Bernards are much loved as gentle family dogs with big hearts and friendly temperaments.

Before you decide to bring one into your family you should be aware that they require as much love and devotion as they give in return. Their size alone dictates the need for basic manners and early obedience training. The fact that they can rest their heads on something as tall as your kitchen table requires that they be taught their limits.

Although they love to be with the family children, their sheer size requires close supervision. They would never intentionally harm a small child but a huge paw or strong tail can accidentally knock a child over.

They are enthusiastic participants in any family activity, and will sulk if not included. They seldom bark without good reason, making them good watchdogs and protectors of their family, but they should never be considered guard dogs.

Despite their large size and tendency to physically grow very quickly, Saint Bernards generally are slow to mature mentally, and their training should be undertaken with a gentle but firm hand, and a good deal of patience and consistency. A well-trained Saint is a wonderful dog to have and they love to please their human owners.

Because they are slow to mature, Saints should not be pushed too rapidly into formal and serious training. Their giant sized bones don’t finish growing until they are two years of age. Activities as simple as jumping in and out of an SUV or pickup truck can permanently damage their soft bones. For this reason, a Saint Bernard should not be pushed into jumping or pulling heavy loads before two years of age.

Saint Bernard puppies grow at a phenomenal rate during the first year of life, increasing in size an average of three pounds per week. They eat somewhere between 6 and 12 cups of dog food per day. They should never be fed high protein puppy food, but instead should be fed an adult formula containing 22-26% protein. Puppy foods containing too much protein can cause the fast growing puppy to grown even faster, and subject it to any number of bone problems.

A Saint Bernard will not “eat you out of house and home.” Saint Bernards can be raised and maintained on the same amount of food required for other large breeds. Since they are basically placid dogs, they generally require less food per pound of body weight than most smaller, more active breeds.

Hip dysplasia in Saint Bernards

Because of their large size, hip dysplasia in Saint Bernards is a common health issue.

Hip Dysplasia is an abnormal development of the hip causing excessive wear of the joint cartilage during weight bearing, eventually leading to the development of arthritis, often called degenerative joint disease or osteoarthritis.

Some of the symptoms and signs of hip dysplasia in Saint Bernards are:

  • Moving more slowly
  • Difficulty getting up and lying down
  • Weight shift to another leg
  • Personality change
  • Reluctance to walk, jump or play
  • Refusing to use stairs or get in the car
  • Change in appetite
  • Change in behavior
  • Muscle atrophy
  • Yelping when touched
  • Limping

Treatment

When a Great Dane is diagnosed with hip dysplasia and the choices for treatment seem limited to expensive surgery or questionable drugs, I recommend you begin treating your dog with Winston’s Joint System.

Winston’s Joint System has a history of successful treatment of Saint Bernards suffering from hip dysplasia and arthritis. This formula is a combination of three natural whole food supplements developed by a Naturopathic Doctor for his own dog and contains no drugs and has no side-effects because it’s just good whole food.

If you’re the proud owner of a noble Saint Bernard and your dog is displaying signs or symptoms of hip dysplasia, see your vet as soon as possible and get a complete examination. Discovering this disease in its early stages and putting your Saint on a regimen of Winston’s Joint System can mean a longer, happier, pain-free life for your pet.

Since 1990, Winston’s Joint System and Winston’s Pain Formula have helped heal over twenty thousand dogs from all over the world. Our staff specializes in hip dysplasia, arthritis and all joint, pain and mobility issues.

There is an excellent chance we can help your dog, so please contact us at: www.dogshealth.com or call our toll free number at 888-901-5557.

Hip Dysplasia in Border Collies

Border Collies are a breed of dog known for their very active lifestyle. Sadly, hip dysplasia in Border Collies is not a rare occurrence, and the more you know about hip dysplasia, the better you will be prepared to watch your pet for any signs of this debilitating disease.

Border Collies

Border Collies are loyal, easily trainable, intelligent dogs with natural energetic personalities. They require a lot of room to run around in, making them better suited to living on a farm or ranch where they can expend their surplus energy. They are not really suited for living indoors, especially in an apartment. These dogs are meant to work and play outdoors in wide-open spaces.

They form a strong bond with their owners but can be unfriendly to strangers, making them good dogs for guarding your house and property. They are not “attack dogs” but they will certainly let you know if a stranger approaches your house.

Border Collies have natural inbred herding instincts and may start “herding” small children or small pets in your household. They are hardy, high-strung dogs with a determined drive. If you’re a person who likes to play sporting games with your dog, you’ll love Border Collies.

But if you’re just looking for a calm, friendly family pet, a Border Collie probably isn’t the ideal choice. They are demanding dogs that need a lot of attention, ample outdoor exercise and a task like herding sheep, goats, or whatever animal (or person) it feels is in need of herding!

Border Collies also like receiving direction. They require firm leadership from an owner who has the time and patience to follow through with obedience lessons and training. They will dominate a weak-willed owner, so it’s very important that a Border Collie understands who’s boss around the house. Severe punishment or harsh treatment for infractions or disobedience are not recommended because they can cause negative reactions in Border Collies, whereas positive reinforcement helps them.

Border Collies are medium-sized dogs with a light frame, long hair, and athletic bodies that are strong and agile. The typical Border Collie has a slightly wide head with a tapered muzzle, half-perked ears and dark, oval eyes. The long tail sometimes raises but never curls over the back. Their coats are usually sleek and their coat colors are solid black, black and white, black and gray, or red and white.

A healthy Border Collie can live as long as 15 years. Common health problems include deafness, epilepsy, and hip dysplasia.

Hip dysplasia in Border Collies

Hip dysplasia is a genetic disease that primarily affects large and giant breeds of dogs but can also affect medium-sized breeds and occasionally small breeds. It is primarily a disease of purebreds, although it can also occur in mixed breeds.

To understand hip dysplasia and resulting arthritis, you need a basic understanding of how the dog’s hip joint is affected. The hip joint is comprised of a ball and socket that forms the attachment of the hind leg to the body. The ball portion is the head of the femur and the socket is located on the pelvis. In a normal hip joint, the ball rotates freely within the socket. The bones are shaped to perfectly match each other with the socket surrounding the ball. To strengthen the joint, the two bones are held together by a strong ligament. The joint capsule, a strong band of connective tissue, circles the two bones to provide added stability.

This is a normal hip joint:


Hip dysplasia is linked to abnormal joint structure and a laxity of the muscles, connective tissue, and ligaments that would normally support the dog’s hip joints. As the disease progresses, the articular surfaces of the two bones lose contact with each other. This separation of the two bones within the joint causes a drastic change in the size and shape of the articular surfaces.

This is an abnormal hip joint:

Most dogs who eventually develop hip dysplasia are born with normal hips, but due to their genetic make-up the soft tissues surrounding the joint develop abnormally. This leads to the symptoms associated with hip dysplasia. The disease may affect both hips, or only the right or left hip.

Hip dysplasia in Border Collies causes afflicted dogs to walk or run with an altered gait, similar to a bunny-hop. They begin to resist any movement that requires full extension or flexion of the rear legs. They will experience stiffness and pain in their rear legs after exercising and on first rising in the morning. Climbing stairs becomes difficult if not impossible. Some dogs will limp and are less willing to participate in normal daily activities, including walks they formerly enjoyed.

It appears that the amount of calories a dog consumes, especially during its fast-growth period from three to ten months, has the biggest impact on whether or not a dog genetically prone to hip dysplasia will develop the disease.

Obesity can increase the severity of the disease in dogs that are genetically susceptible and the extra weight will intensify the degeneration of a dog’s joints and hips. Dogs who are genetically prone to hip dysplasia and also are overweight, are at a much higher risk of developing hip dysplasia and eventually osteoarthritis.

Exercise can be another risk factor. Dogs genetically susceptible to hip dysplasia may have an increased incidence of the disease if they are over-exercised at a young age. Moderate exercise like running and swimming is best for exercising young dogs.

Prevention

Because hip dysplasia is primarily an inherited condition in Border Collies, there are no products that can prevent its development. Through proper diet, exercise, and a daily regimen of Winston’s Joint System, you can slow, and sometimes halt, the progression of these degenerative joint diseases while providing your dog with relief from its pain. Winston’s provides many of the raw materials essential for the synthesis of the joint-lubricating synovial fluid as well as the repair of articular cartilage and connective tissue.

There are different assumptions on how to prevent the progression of hip dysplasia in Border Collies. Poor nutrition, inadequate or improper exercise, and increased body weight may all contribute to the severity of osteoarthritis after the hip dysplasia has developed. By watching the calories your puppy or young dog consumes and preventing obesity in your dog, allowing only non-stressful types of exercise, and a daily regimen of Winston’s Joint System, are the best things you can do for your dog.

Since 1990, Winston’s Joint System and Winston’s Pain Formula have helped heal over twenty thousand dogs from all over the world. Our staff specializes in hip dysplasia, arthritis and all joint, pain and mobility issues.

There is an excellent chance we can help your dog, so please contact us or call our toll free number at 888-901-5557.

Hip Dysplasia in Rottweilers

Rottweilers are known to be very strong and sturdy animals, but unfortunately, hip dysplasia in Rottweilers is a fairly common health problem.

Meet the Rottweilers

Rottweilers are noted for being self-confident and intelligent, and when they are properly trained and socialized, they become loving, devoted companions.

Rotties are extremely energetic dogs and love to play catch, keep pace alongside you when out for a run, or go for a long hike in the woods or mountains.

They crave attention and companionship from their owners and when they don’t receive it they tend to get bored and destructive. A neglected or mistreated Rottweiler can quickly destroy your possessions.

A contented and well trained Rottweiler makes a devoted friend to children and an extremely efficient watchdog. They make good companions because they are always eager to please.

Rotties are huge dogs with challenging temperaments. They appreciate a confident owner who can show them who’s boss. They occasionally like to test authority, so you need to stay current with their training and obedience commands.

They appreciate stimulating tasks and activities and enjoy being kept busy with obedience games. Always keep them on a leash in public because they can be somewhat confrontational with other dogs.

They are believed to have descended from the sturdy and muscular Mastiff-like dogs of ancient Rome. Their name comes from the German cattle town of Rottweil, where the dogs managed herds of cattle for hundreds of years. In the early 1900’s they became popular police dogs and today they are prized as both working dogs and beloved companions.

Rottweilers have medium-sized, powerful builds and dense, straight glossy coats. They have broad heads with rounded skulls and straight, well-developed muzzles. Their dark, almond-shaped eyes have a friendly look, and their triangular ears hang forward. They have strong necks, firm backs and often have their tails docked. Their coats are usually black with rusty patches.

A healthy Rottweiler can live as long as 12 years. Common health issues include eye problems and hip dysplasia.

Hip Dysplasia in Rottweilers

Hip dysplasia is a genetic disease that primarily affects large and giant breeds of dogs but can also affect medium-sized breeds and occasionally small breeds. It is primarily a disease of purebreds, although it can also occur in mixed breeds.

To understand hip dysplasia in Rottweilers and the resulting arthritis, you need a basic understanding of how the dog’s hip joint is affected.

The hip joint is comprised of a ball and socket that forms the attachment of the hind leg to the body. The ball portion is the head of the femur and the socket is located on the pelvis.

In a normal hip joint the ball rotates freely within the socket. The bones are shaped to perfectly match each other with the socket surrounding the ball. To strengthen the joint, the two bones are held together by a strong ligament. The joint capsule, a strong band of connective tissue, circles the two bones to provide added stability.

A normal hip joint:

Hip dysplasia is linked to abnormal joint structure and a laxity of the muscles, connective tissue, and ligaments that would normally support the dog’s hip joints.

As the disease progresses, the articular surfaces of the two bones lose contact with each other. This separation of the two bones within the joint causes a drastic change in the size and shape of the articular surfaces.

A diseased hip joint:

Most Rottweilers who eventually develop hip dysplasia are born with normal hips, but due to their genetic make-up the soft tissues surrounding the joint develop abnormally. This leads to the symptoms associated with hip dysplasia. The disease may affect both hips, or only the right or left hip.

The symptoms of hip dysplasia in Rottweilers cause afflicted dogs to walk or run with an altered gait, similar to a bunny-hop.

They begin to resist any movement that requires full extension or flexion of the rear legs. They will experience stiffness and pain in their rear legs after exercising and on first rising in the morning. Climbing stairs becomes difficult if not impossible. Some dogs will limp and are less willing to participate in normal daily activities, including walks they formerly enjoyed.

It appears that the amount of calories a dog consumes, especially during its fast-growth period from three to ten months, has the biggest impact on whether or not a dog genetically prone to hip dysplasia will develop the disease.

Obesity can increase the severity of the disease in dogs that are genetically susceptible and the extra weight will intensify the degeneration of a dog’s joints and hips. Dogs who are genetically prone to hip dysplasia and also are overweight, are at a much higher risk of developing hip dysplasia and eventually osteoarthritis.

Exercise can be another risk factor. Dogs genetically susceptible to hip dysplasia may have an increased incidence of the disease if they are over-exercised at a young age. Moderate exercise like running and swimming is best for exercising young dogs.

Prevention

Because hip dysplasia in Rotties is primarily an inherited condition, there are no products that can prevent its development.

Through proper diet, exercise, and a daily regimen of Winston’s Joint System, you can slow, and sometimes halt, the progression of these degenerative joint diseases while providing your dog with relief from its pain.

If you’re looking to adopt a Rottie, the best way to lessen the possibility of getting a dog that will develop hip dysplasia is to examine the incidence of the disease in the dog’s lineage. If at all possible, try to examine the parents and grandparents as far back as three or four generations.

There are different assumptions on how to prevent the progression of hip dysplasia in Rottweilers: Poor nutrition, inadequate or improper exercise, and increased body weight, may all contribute to the severity of osteoarthritis after the hip dysplasia has developed. Watching the calories your puppy or young dog consumes and preventing obesity, allowing only non-stressful types of exercise, and a daily regimen of Winston’s Joint System, are the best things you can do for your dog.

Since 1990, Winston’s Joint System and Winston’s Pain Formula have helped heal over twenty thousand dogs from all over the world. Our staff specializes in hip dysplasia, arthritis and all joint, pain and mobility issues.

There is an excellent chance we can help your dog, so please contact us at: www.dogshealth.com or call our toll free number at 888-901-5557.

Removing Pet Odors From Your House

Removing pet odors from your house can be easy and you’ll create a healthy environment for you and your family or guests. The key to removing these odors is to first remove the source if you expect the smell to completely disappear and not have it return shortly after you’ve cleaned.

If you have a pet dog (or maybe two) you know exactly what it’s like to live with gobs of hair, a sofa and chairs that smell strange, and the ever so popular urine on your rugs and carpets.

Living with your pet day in and day out, it’s easy to get used to these odors and not even notice that sometimes your house smells like a kennel.

The first thing you’ll need to do is give your dog a bath on a regular basis. This will depend on factors like how long your dog’s coat is, whether it’s strictly an inside dog or whether it always runs around your yard, and whether you let your dog roll about in the dirt or whatever it feels like romping around in. If a dog is dirty it will spread mud or filth all over your house.

You’ll also need to be vigilant in removing excess hair from your dog and not wait until it’s all over your furniture.

Once a week remove any dog hair from your furniture using a standard vacuum cleaner with the side attachment. Just vacuum the furniture until all the hair is gone. You can also use a lint roller to pick up the loose hair.

Your floors should be cleaned at least once a week. Rugs and carpets vacuumed, and wood or tile floors swept clean before mopping. On tile or linoleum floors you can use bleach to be sure all the bacteria is killed.

Replace the air conditioning and furnace filters once a month. Loose dog hair tends to stick to filters.

Disinfecting hard surfaces that your dog comes in daily contact with will help remove any lingering odors, and by using a sanitizer you can kill more than 99% of all germs, including cold and flu viruses that may be clinging to surfaces in your home.

Standard spray air fresheners will only mask the scents in your house and you’ll end up with a dog that smells like a pet covered with flowers. Buy a spray that removes odors instead of covering them up.

You’re going to need a pet stain and odor remover if you want to get rid of all urine odors. An inexpensive and just as effective method for removing these odors is to spray the urine stained areas with a mixture of half vinegar and half water.

You should wash your pet’s bedding at least two times a month, then spray it for a fresh, clean scent.

Removing pet odors from your house doesn’t need to be a time consuming chore that you hate to face every week. Just follow the instructions above and soon your house will be free of unpleasant dog odors.

Hip Dysplasia in Giant Schnauzers

Giant Schnauzers were bred for tasks such as herding and cattle driving. The breed was created by crossing Standard Schnauzers with bigger dogs like Great Danes. This interbreeding with Great Danes who were susceptible to hip problems was responsible for introducing hip dysplasia in Giant Schnauzers.

Giant Schnauzers

Giant Schnauzers are devoted and protective dogs with a high-energy level. They are bigger and bolder than their smaller cousins, the Standard Schnauzer, but are just as lively and frisky.

They are clever and trainable pets but need lots of attention and guidance combined with ample playtime and obedience exercises.

Giant Schnauzers make very attentive companions, preferring to stay very close to their owners (which can be a bit unnerving to some people when a dog this large seems intent on watching every move they make). They are affectionate and love to be involved in all the activities that take place in the home.

Giant Schnauzers make excellent watchdogs. Their intense loyalty to their family and their commanding presence makes them a fearless guard dog, able to easily distinguish between friend and enemy. They won’t bark randomly or unnecessarily, but they will bark loudly and forcefully when they sense threats to their family or themselves.

Giants need lots of outdoor exercise; vigorous daily walks or long jogs help them maintain their strong physical and mental health. They always need to be walked on a leash because they have strong hunting instincts, and any small creatures —whether birds or cats— easily excite them.

While the Miniature Schnauzer and Standard Schnauzer were originally bred to chase and kill rats, their Giant cousin was meant for bigger tasks such as herding, and even —believe it or not— for barroom bouncing. The breed originated in Germany. It was created by crossing Standard Schnauzers with much bigger dogs like Great Danes and they do extremely well handling a wide range of tasks, including cattle driving and police work.

Giant Schnauzers are basically larger, stronger versions of the Standard Schnauzer and have a large, square-built body structure with dense, wiry coats. Their long heads have distinctive bushy beards, mustaches and eyebrows, and deeply set eyes, powerful muzzles and V-shaped ears that point up and forward. Their tails, which some owners choose to dock, are carried high. They come in solid black and salt & pepper colors.

A healthy Giant can live as long as 15 years. As they age they are prone to developing hip dysplasia and arthritis. Other common health issues include eye disease and autoimmune thyroiditis.

Hip dysplasia in Giant Schnauzers

Hip dysplasia is a genetic disease that primarily affects large and giant breeds of dogs (like the Giant Schnauzer) but can also affect medium-sized breeds and occasionally small breeds. It is primarily a disease of purebreds, although it can also occur in mixed breeds.

To understand hip dysplasia in Giant Schnauzers and the resulting arthritis, you need a basic understanding of how the dog’s hip joint is affected.

The hip joint is comprised of a ball and socket that forms the attachment of the hind leg to the body. The ball portion is the head of the femur and the socket is located on the pelvis.

In a normal hip joint the ball rotates freely within the socket. The bones are shaped to perfectly match each other with the socket surrounding the ball. To strengthen the joint, the two bones are held together by a strong ligament. The joint capsule, a strong band of connective tissue, circles the two bones to provide added stability.

This is what a normal hip joint looks like in an X-ray:

Hip dysplasia is linked to abnormal joint structure and a laxity of the muscles, connective tissue, and ligaments that would normally support the dog’s hip joints.

As the disease progresses, the articular surfaces of the two bones lose contact with each other. This separation of the two bones within the joint causes a drastic change in the size and shape of the articular surfaces.

This is what the same joint looks like when a dog has hip dysplasia:

Most Giant Schnauzers who eventually develop hip dysplasia are born with normal hips, but due to their genetic make-up the soft tissues surrounding the joint develop abnormally. This leads to the symptoms associated with hip dysplasia. The disease may affect both hips, or only the right or left hip.

The symptoms of hip dysplasia in Giant Schnauzers cause afflicted dogs to walk or run with an altered gait, similar to a bunny-hop. They begin to resist any movement that requires full extension or flexion of the rear legs.

They will experience stiffness and pain in their rear legs after exercising and on first rising in the morning. Climbing stairs becomes difficult if not impossible. Some dogs will limp and are less willing to participate in normal daily activities, including walks they formerly enjoyed.

It appears that the amount of calories a dog consumes, especially during its fast-growth period from three to ten months, has the biggest impact on whether or not a dog genetically prone to hip dysplasia will develop the disease.

Obesity can increase the severity of the disease in dogs that are genetically susceptible and the extra weight will intensify the degeneration of a dog’s joints and hips. Dogs who are genetically prone to hip dysplasia and also are overweight, are at a much higher risk of developing hip dysplasia and eventually osteoarthritis.

Exercise can be another risk factor. Dogs genetically susceptible to hip dysplasia like Giant Schnauzers may have an increased incidence of the disease if they are over-exercised at a young age. Moderate exercise like running and swimming is best for exercising young dogs.

Prevention

Because hip dysplasia is primarily an inherited condition, there are no products that can prevent its development.

Through proper diet, exercise, and a daily regimen of Winston’s Joint System, you can slow, and sometimes halt, the progression of these degenerative joint diseases while providing your dog with relief from its pain. Winston’s provides many of the raw materials essential for the synthesis of the joint-lubricating synovial fluid as well as the repair of articular cartilage and connective tissue.

If owners insisted on only purchasing an animal whose parents and grandparents were certified to have good or excellent hips, and if breeders only bred these first-rate animals, then the majority of the problems caused by hip dysplasia would be eliminated.

If you are looking to purchase a Giant Schnauzer now or in the future, the best way to lessen the possibility of getting a dog that will develop hip dysplasia is to examine the incidence of the disease in the dog’s lineage. If at all possible, try to examine the parents and grandparents as far back as three or four generations.

There are different assumptions on how to prevent the progression of hip dysplasia in Giant Schnauzers.

Poor nutrition, inadequate or improper exercise, and increased body weight may all contribute to the severity of osteoarthritis after the hip dysplasia has developed. Watching the calories your puppy or young dog consumes and preventing obesity in your dog, allowing only non-stressful types of exercise, and a daily regimen of Winston’s Joint System, are the best things you can do for your dog.

Since 1990, Winston’s Joint System and Winston’s Pain Formula have helped heal over twenty thousand dogs from all over the world. Our staff specializes in hip dysplasia, arthritis and all joint, pain and mobility issues.

There is an excellent chance we can help your dog, so please contact us at: www.dogshealth.com or call our toll free number at 888-901-5557.

Hip Dysplasia in Great Pyrenees

Hip dysplasia in Great Pyrenees is a genetic disease that can cause an afflicted dog to walk or run with an altered gait.

Great Pyrenees

Great Pyrenees are handsome dogs; hardworking and tough with a keen understanding of people. They are gentle, patient and obedient, quick to learn, and eager to please.

Great Pyrenees are the perfect pet for the whole family. They have an interesting mix of independence and selfless concern for others. If you happen to live in a rural area, your Great Pyrenees might wander off at any time to make sure “the borders” are safe. They make superb watchdogs, protective, intimidating, yet calm-natured.

Great Pyrenees need lots of positive reinforcement and rewards when being trained and they are very likely to ignore any training if you’re impatient with them.

Pyrs were made for cold weather. If you live in a year-round hot climate, you’ll need to keep them indoors most of the time or be sure they have plenty of shade and water if left outdoors. One of the traits that bothers some owners is their tendency to drool and slobber when exerting themselves.

Great Pyrenees have been guarding sheep in the Pyrenees Mountains since 1800 B.C. It is believed that they originated in Asia where their excellent sense of smell and intelligence made them valuable to herders on the steep mountain slopes.

Great Pyrenees have large, solid frames covered in coarse, white coats that are either straight or wavy. Their snowy fur can also have patches of gray and tan. They have broad chests and wide backs that lend a boxy look to their bodies. They have wedge-shaped heads with slightly rounded skulls and medium-sized muzzles. Their dark brown eyes have a dignified but alert expression, and their noses and lips are black.

Pyrs can live as long as 10 years. As a large breed, pure-bred dog, they are susceptible to hip dysplasia.

Hip dysplasia in Great Pyrenees

Hip dysplasia is a genetic disease that primarily affects large and giant breeds of dogs like the Great Pyrenees, but can also affect medium-sized breeds and occasionally small breeds. It is predominately a disease of purebreds, although it can also occur in mixed breeds.

To understand hip dysplasia and the resulting arthritis, you need a basic understanding of how the dog’s hip joint is affected.

The hip joint is comprised of a ball and socket that forms the attachment of the hind leg to the body. The ball portion is the head of the femur and the socket is located on the pelvis.

In a normal hip joint the ball rotates freely within the socket. The bones are shaped to perfectly match each other with the socket surrounding the ball. To strengthen the joint, the two bones are held together by a strong ligament. The joint capsule, a strong band of connective tissue, circles the two bones to provide added stability.

X-ray of a normal hip joint:

Hip dysplasia is linked to abnormal joint structure and a laxity of the muscles, connective tissue, and ligaments that would normally support the dog’s hip joints. As the disease progresses, the articular surfaces of the two bones lose contact with each other. This separation of the two bones within the joint causes a drastic change in the size and shape of the articular surfaces.

X-ray of a hip joint showing the effects of hip dysplasia:

Most dogs who eventually develop hip dysplasia are born with normal hips, but due to their genetic make-up the soft tissues surrounding the joint develop abnormally. This leads to the symptoms associated with hip dysplasia. The disease may affect both hips, or only the right or left hip.

The symptoms of hip dysplasia in Great Pyrenees cause afflicted dogs to walk or run with an altered gait, similar to a bunny-hop. They begin to resist any movement that requires full extension or flexion of the rear legs. They will experience stiffness and pain in their rear legs after exercising and on first rising in the morning. Climbing stairs becomes difficult if not impossible. Some dogs will limp and are less willing to participate in normal daily activities, including walks they formerly enjoyed.

It appears that the amount of calories a dog consumes, especially during its fast-growth period from three to ten months, has the biggest impact on whether or not a dog genetically prone to hip dysplasia will develop the disease.

Obesity can increase the severity of the disease in dogs that are genetically susceptible and the extra weight will intensify the degeneration of a dog’s joints and hips. Dogs who are genetically prone to hip dysplasia and also are overweight, are at a much higher risk of developing hip dysplasia and eventually osteoarthritis.

Exercise can be another risk factor. Dogs genetically susceptible to hip dysplasia may have an increased incidence of the disease if they are over-exercised at a young age. Moderate exercise like running and swimming is best for exercising young dogs.

Prevention

Hip dysplasia is primarily an inherited condition.

Through proper diet, exercise, and a daily regimen of Winston’s Joint System, you can slow, and sometimes halt, the progression of this degenerative joint disease while providing your dog with relief from its pain. Winston’s provides many of the raw materials essential for the synthesis of the joint-lubricating synovial fluid as well as the repair of articular cartilage and connective tissue.

You might also want to consider providing your dog with an orthopedic bed, which distributes the dog’s weight evenly and reduces pressure on its joints. It’s perfect for dogs with hip dysplasia or arthritis.

If owners insisted on only purchasing an animal whose parents and grandparents were certified to have good or excellent hips, and if breeders only bred these first-rate animals, then the majority of the problems caused by hip dysplasia would be eliminated.

If you are looking to purchase a Great Pyrenees, now or in the future, the best way to lessen the possibility of getting a dog that will develop hip dysplasia is to examine the incidence of the disease in the dog’s lineage. If at all possible, try to examine the parents and grandparents as far back as three or four generations.

There are different assumptions on how to prevent the progression of hip dysplasia in Great Pyrenees. Poor nutrition, inadequate or improper exercise, and increased body weight may all contribute to the severity of osteoarthritis after the hip dysplasia has developed.

By watching the calories your puppy or young dog consumes and preventing obesity in your dog, allowing only non-stressful types of exercise, are the best things you can do.

Since 1990, Winston’s Joint System and Winston’s Pain Formula have helped heal over twenty thousand dogs from all over the world. Our staff specializes in hip dysplasia, arthritis and all joint, pain and mobility issues.

There is an excellent chance we can help your dog, so please contact us at: www.dogshealth.com or call our toll free number at 888-901-5557.