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The #1 source for immediate, long-term relief for dogs suffering from degenerative diseases like hip dysplasia, OCD and arthritis.

We are specialists in the treatment of canine joint disease and its accompanying pain.

Let us help put an end to your dog’s suffering, joint stiffness, pain, immobility, and poor quality of life. Our proven products will help you easily accomplish this without the use of drugs or invasive surgery.

Joint Issues

  • Hip Dysplasia
  • Arthritis
  • Osteochondritis (OCD)
  • Stiffness/Inflammation
  • Ligament Tears
  • Growing Pains
  • Mobility Problems
  • Joint Pain
  • Back/Spinal Problems
  • Hypertrophic Osteodystrophy (HOD)

Symptoms

Is your pet becoming less active, less playful, or desiring shorter walks? The following symptoms could be early signs of OCD, Arthritis or Hip Dysplasia.

  • Moving more slowly
  • Difficulty getting up
  • Weight shift to another leg
  • Personality change
  • Reluctant to walk, jump or play
  • Refuses using stairs or the car
  • Change in appetite
  • Change in behavior
  • Muscle atrophy
  • Lagging behind
  • Yelping when touched
  • Limping
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Posts Tagged ‘Pit Bulls’

Hip Dysplasia in Pit Bulls

Monday, August 20th, 2012


Canine hip dysplasia is a common orthopedic problem in Pit Bulls. The disease is caused by a loose hipbone to thighbone connection leading to hind joint pain and lameness ranging from mild to severely crippling.

Hip dysplasia is genetically transmitted but because multiple genes are involved, scientists have not been able to determine the pattern of inheritance.

Adding to the problem of causation is the complicated interplay between heredity and the environment. Environmental factors can have an influence on whether or not a particular dog or breed of dog will eventually develop hip dysplasia. Scientists who study canines still do not understand the interaction of heredity and environmental factors.

Although the disease disproportionately affects larger breed dogs, veterinarians have documented hip dysplasia in Pit Bulls and just about every other type of dog, including mixed breeds. There are some preventive measures that can be taken to reduce the odds of a dog developing hip dysplasia. Early detection and treatment can help a dog live a long and relatively comfortable life.

Remember the adage “The hipbone’s connected to the thighbone?”. Try to picture a dog’s hip joint as a ball fitting into a socket. The ball is the top of the thighbone which is coated with a smooth surface of cartilage. The femoral head fits into the hip’s socket and the entire ball-and-socket joint is surrounded and supported by muscles, ligaments, and lubricating synovial fluid.

During the growth spurt from birth to 60 days, the muscles and connective tissue of a puppy prone to hip dysplasia – unlike a normal puppy – cannot keep the same growth pace as the faster growing bones. The resulting looseness of the joint causes abnormal wear on the cartilage that lines the femoral head. As the cartilage deteriorates, hip dysplasia or arthritis often sets in, sometimes both simultaneously. Arthritis is basically an abortive attempt by the body to stabilize the joint by adding bone.

Although pain and restricted range of motion are symptoms of hip dysplasia, other signs may depend on the age of the dog and the degree of arthritis present. Young dysplastic dogs often move both back legs simultaneously in a “bunny hop” gait. On the other hand, some younger dogs whose X-rays show evidence of hip dysplasia are able to maintain normal mobility and will show signs of hip dysplasia only after they grow older and develop arthritis.

Symptoms of hip dysplasia include moving more slowly, difficulty in getting up or lying down, reluctance to walk, jump or play, refusing to use stairs or get into the car, muscle atrophy, limping, yelping when touched, changes in appetite, and personality changes. Both older and younger dogs suffering from hip dysplasia feel the most discomfort in cold, damp weather.

Pit Bulls who develop hip dysplasia or arthritis suffer from pain and stiffness in their joints which greatly diminishes their ability to live a quality life and remain active.

When a Pit Bull is diagnosed with hip dysplasia and the choices for treatment seem limited to expensive surgery or questionable drugs, I recommend you begin treating your dog with Winston’s Joint System, an all-natural formula developed by a Naturopathic Doctor to heal his own beloved dog. This proven formula has been giving relief from pain and stiffness to all breeds and ages of dogs for more than 20 years.

Winston’s is a combination of three, totally-natural whole food supplements and contains no drugs. There are no side-effects because it’s just good whole food. There are no dosage problems because the dog’s body uses only what it needs.

Winston’s provides many of the raw materials essential for the synthesis of the joint-lubricating synovial fluid as well as the repair of articular cartilage and connective tissue. Within the first 30 days of treatment, dogs on Winston’s Joint System show noticeable and often remarkable improvement.

Although canine hip dysplasia (CHD) may remain unseen in some dogs, early detection is critical. The first step to determining whether a Pit Bull has hip dysplasia is through a careful physical examination by a veterinarian who will observe the dog as it sits, stands, and walks. This is the first measure to check for characteristic signs of hip dysplasia such as a side-to-side swinging gait, lameness, and arched back which is caused by shifting weight forward, or the presence of overdeveloped front-leg and shoulder muscles.

The veterinarian will move the dog’s hip joint to assess its range of motion and check for pain with the joint extended. The vet will also listen for the “click” of the hip popping out of joint and for any grating sound of bone on bone that indicates cartilage loss.

Weight loss and moderate exercise, can also help alleviate pain and inflammation in and around the joint. The heavier the dog, the greater the forces acting on the joints.

When choosing which activities are appropriate for a Pit Bull suffering from hip dysplasia, take into account the dog’s physical condition and pain threshold, and compromise between complete exercise restriction and unlimited physical activity. Complete restriction is inadvisable because it adds to a dog’s pain and stiffness. Determine an appropriate activity level and help the dog stick to it.

A dog’s stomach is not quite as robust as a human’s, so avoid long-term use of aspirin which can cause vomiting and internal bleeding. Mega-doses of vitamin C are also not effective at preventing or even helping hip dysplasia, and supplementing a dog’s diet with calcium can actually exacerbate the disease. Because of potential toxicity and side–effects, veterinarians rarely prescribe medications containing acetaminophen, ibuprofen, or corticosteroids for hip dysplasia.

Although genes play a big role in the development of canine hip dysplasia, not everything about the disease is hereditary. Evidence suggests that even dogs genetically predisposed to the disease can escape its worst effects if breeders and owners control rapid growth and weight gain during puppy hood, thereby increasing the chance that muscles, connective tissues, and hip joint bones will develop at the same rate.

Studies show that puppies fed a high-calorie diet grow faster than their litter mates on a low-calorie diet. Research also shows that puppies with constant access to food have more hip-joint laxity at 30 weeks and a higher incidence of hip dysplasia at 2 years than their counterparts who eat 25 percent less food on a restricted feeding schedule. Feeding a puppy a controlled, balanced diet is probably the best way to manage its growth.

Although veterinary science is still searching for definitive answers about how canine hip dysplasia develops, a diagnosis of the disease in a dog is not the end of the world. Loving owners, working with their veterinarians, can usually help dogs with unstable hipbone-thighbone connections cope in relative comfort. And in the process, owners can enhance their relationship with their loving companion.

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Dogs: Man’s Best Friend

Monday, January 9th, 2012


Dogs are a man’s best friend (and a woman’s too!)

If the only thing I got from having my pet dog was friendship and a trustworthy companion, it would be enough for me. But there is so much more that this beautiful, loving animal brings into my life. He brings love (lots of it), true happiness whenever we’re together, and enjoyment that only a dog can give.

Most dogs provide valuable accompaniment to their owners. Some breeds like Pit Bulls and Rottweilers are more “loners” and don’t require a lot of attention as do breeds like Golden and Labrador Retrievers, Boxers, Beagles, Terriers or Sheepdogs.

Some dogs are sporty and enjoy running, walking and playing fetch with adults and children. These types of dogs are great for children who have no siblings to play with.

Many dogs have also proven themselves to be invaluable to their owners and have saved many lives by awakening a family when their house was on fire or by rescuing a child who was drowning in a pool.

Dogs are also very useful in giving medical assistance to those in need. They can detect seizures in a person before they occur, which enables epileptic people to live a normal life without fear of a sudden seizure while driving or operating machinery.

Dogs also help the blind to navigate their way around in the outside world as well as within the home.

Dogs provide security to their owners from home intruders and are especially useful outside at night when human visibility is marginal.

Specially trained police dogs can sniff through bags at airports to detect drugs and other illegal substances.

Purebred German Shepherds are used by police departments because they are known for their trainability and eagerness to work.

Dogs such as bloodhounds can track down suspects by the scent left behind.

Dogs have many personalities within the same breed and certain breeds are popular due to their inbred traits.

If you don’t already have a pet dog, perhaps today is the day to start looking for one of man’s best friends who will never let you down, and who just might save your life in the event of an emergency.

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Hip Dysplasia in Large and Older Dogs

Tuesday, November 30th, 2010


Hip dysplasia in large and older dogs is medically referred to as Canine Hip Dysplasia (CHD) and is a common disease in large breeds and older dogs. But it can also affect dogs of any age and breed, although it’s rarer in small breeds.

Hip dysplasia is genetically transmitted from a dog’s parents or grandparents, but because multiple genes are involved, scientists have not been able to determine the pattern of inheritance. Adding to the problem of causation is the complicated interplay between heredity and the environment. Environmental factors can also have an influence on whether or not a particular dog or breed of dog will eventually develop hip dysplasia. Canine hip dysplasia is the most common orthopedic problem in dogs and is caused by a loose hipbone to thighbone connection leading to hind joint pain and lameness ranging from mild to severely crippling.

Hip dysplasia is a very debilitating disease and painful for the poor dog who has to suffer with it.

Canine hip dysplasia most often affects these breeds:
Golden Retrievers
Labrador Retrievers
German Shepherds
Great Danes
Pit Bulls
Mastiffs
Doberman Pinschers
Saint Bernards

Early symptoms of hip dysplasia include:
Changes in gait, including a “bunny hop” walk
Sitting rather than standing
Difficulty getting up
Crying or yelping when an affected joint is moved or touched
Signs of pain during and after activity
Pain in the rear legs and hips, especially in the mornings
Trouble climbing stairs or running
Avoiding normal activities like a morning or evening walk

These symptoms of hip dysplasia may seem like gradual changes that are common to an aging dog, but by noticing these physical signs in the early stages, an owner can prevent further pain and suffering for their dog and improve the dog’s mobility and activity levels before the disease has developed to the point that surgery or powerful medications are required.

Dogs who do suffer with joint diseases such as arthritis, osteochondrosis (OCD), hip dysplasia and other degenerative joint problems can experience immediate and long-term relief with a regimen of Winston’s Joint System.

Winston’s Joint System is a combination of three, totally-natural whole food supplements developed by a Naturopathic Doctor for his own dog. There are no drugs in Winston’s and there are no side-effects because it’s just good whole food. And there are no dosage problems because the dog’s body uses only what it needs.

Winston’s provides many of the raw materials essential for the synthesis of the joint-lubricating synovial fluid as well as the repair of articular cartilage and connective tissue. Within the first 30 days of treatment, dogs on Winston’s Joint System show noticeable and often remarkable improvement.

Hip dysplasia is a genetic disease that often can’t be prevented. It is a progressively degenerative disease, so any measure of prevention you can take at an early stage will improve the quality of your dog’s life for years. If you own a large breed dog like one of those listed above, or your dog is a senior dog showing signs of joint disease, you owe it to your faithful companion to start him on Winston’s Joint System as soon as possible.

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