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The #1 source for immediate, long-term relief for dogs suffering from degenerative diseases like hip dysplasia, OCD and arthritis.

We are specialists in the treatment of canine joint disease and its accompanying pain.

Let us help put an end to your dog’s suffering, joint stiffness, pain, immobility, and poor quality of life. Our proven products will help you easily accomplish this without the use of drugs or invasive surgery.

Joint Issues

  • Hip Dysplasia
  • Arthritis
  • Osteochondritis (OCD)
  • Stiffness/Inflammation
  • Ligament Tears
  • Growing Pains
  • Mobility Problems
  • Joint Pain
  • Back/Spinal Problems
  • Hypertrophic Osteodystrophy (HOD)

Symptoms

Is your pet becoming less active, less playful, or desiring shorter walks? The following symptoms could be early signs of OCD, Arthritis or Hip Dysplasia.

  • Moving more slowly
  • Difficulty getting up
  • Weight shift to another leg
  • Personality change
  • Reluctant to walk, jump or play
  • Refuses using stairs or the car
  • Change in appetite
  • Change in behavior
  • Muscle atrophy
  • Lagging behind
  • Yelping when touched
  • Limping
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Posts Tagged ‘Muscle Atrophy’

Degenerative Joint Disease

Monday, October 7th, 2013

The words arthritis, osteoarthritis and degenerative joint disease are often used to describe the same disease, and no matter what it is called, the result is pain and inflammation in a dog’s joints. The term “arthritis” is the most common one used to describe this joint disease that can easily, and usually does at some point, incapacitate a dog.

The gradual loss of the smooth cartilage that covers and protects the end of the bones in a dog’s movable joints results in what is labeled “Degenerative Joint Disease.” There are no nerves in the cartilage, so when the cartilage of one bone presses or rubs against the cartilage of another bone, the dog feels no pain. But when the cartilage completely wears away due to aging or joint disease, the bone becomes exposed. The bone itself has nerves, so when the two bone ends in a joint touch each other, the result is severe pain and inflammation.

Adding to the cause of pain in degenerative joint disease are the small bony projections that form on the bone closest to the joint. This type of arthritis progressively worsens until the poor dog has considerable difficulty getting up and down by itself. The pain is so severe in some dogs that they are unable to stand or walk.

Degenerative joint disease in a dog can develop simply as a result of normal wear and tear on a joint and becomes worse as the dog ages. Veterinarians refer to this stage of the disease as “primary degenerative joint disease.” Osteoarthritis can also develop as a result of another condition that affects a dog’s joints. This is what is known as “secondary degenerative joint disease” and is identified either as hip dysplasia or elbow dysplasia.

Any dog with a congenital joint problem like hip dysplasia is at a high risk of developing degenerative joint disease and is more likely to develop arthritis if it has suffered a fracture involving the joint or has a ruptured ligament in the knee.

The symptoms of arthritis vary depending on which joints are involved, the age of the dog, and the severity of the disease. The first symptoms an owner usually notices is a change in the way their dog walks because the dog will try to put more of its weight on the unaffected limbs. This results in the muscle wasting away in the affected limb because the dog is using it less, or is putting less weight on it. If a dog has hip dysplasia involving both hind legs, the muscles of those legs may be thin, compared to the muscles of the chest and shoulders which often become larger because the dog has to put more weight on its front legs.

Depending upon the amount of pain a dog has, its appetite may diminish and it will often choose to be alone in a warm or soft place where it can rest or sleep. The dog’s joints generally don’t become swollen and what the dog feels is a dull aching pain. This is why a dog usually won’t cry out in pain when it has degenerative joint disease.

Some types of degenerative joint disease can be treated with surgery, but in lieu of an expensive procedure like hip replacement, a safer, easier and much less expensive solution is Winston’s Joint System. This all-natural formula was developed by a Naturopathic Doctor to heal his own beloved pet when nothing else worked. For more than 20 years this proven formula has been providing dogs relief from the pain and stiffness of degenerative joint disease.

Degenerative joint disease does not heal itself. It is a progressive, debilitating disease that will continue to worsen without treatment. This is all the more reason to start your dog on a daily regimen of Winston’s Joint System if your vet identifies the problem as hip dysplasia, arthritis, or OCD. Winston’s is a tried and proven formula that will slow the progression of your dog’s joint disease and allow the dog to live comfortably for years.

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Hip Dysplasia in Dogs:Causes and Symptoms

Monday, August 12th, 2013

Hip Dysplasia in dogs is a disease that affects the hip joint that attaches a dog’s hind leg to its body. The hip joint is a ball-and-socket joint with the ball portion being the head of the femur (the main bone in the thigh) and the socket which is attached to the dog’s pelvis.

In a healthy, normal joint, the ball rotates easily within the socket. The hip joint is strengthened by a strong ligament that attaches the femur head directly to the socket. The joint capsule is a very strong band of connective tissue that circles the two bones and provides stability for a dog’s rear legs. In healthy dogs, the area where the bones actually touch each other is smooth and cushioned with a layer of spongy cartilage. The hip joint also contains a thick fluid that keeps the joint lubricated. In a dog with normal hips, all of these components work together and help the joint function smoothly to support the dog’s stability.

Hip dysplasia is a result of abnormal joint structure in the dog’s hip which results in the muscles becoming slack; it also affects the connective tissue and ligaments that support the hip joint. As the dog’s hip joint continues to deteriorate, the surfaces of the two hip bones start to separate in the joint and cause structural changes in the surfaces of the bone. As the cartilage is progressively worn away, the pain becomes intense when the dog stands or walks.

Most dogs are born with normal hips and will never develop this debilitating disease unless their genetic background includes a predisposition for hip dysplasia or arthritis. Hip dysplasia will sometimes affect both the right and left hip joints but more often only affects one hip.

Hip dysplasia symptoms usually don’t appear until a dog reaches middle-age or older. The disorder will get worse until all normal movements of the dog’s legs become too painful to endure. Surgery is sometimes recommended by veterinarians but is costly and not often advised if a dog is older. Rimadyl is a pain killer vets sometimes prescribe for dogs suffering from hip dysplasia and/or arthritis.

There are many pros and cons about giving a dog Rimadyl for hip dysplasia and arthritis pain. As a responsible pet owner, it would be a very good idea to research this drug as thoroughly as you can before giving your dog this medication. A much safer treatment, and one that many owners agree is more effective, is to put your dog on a daily regimen of Winston’s Joint System, an all-natural formula developed by a Naturopathic Doctor to heal his own beloved dog who suffered from hip dysplasia. For more than 20 years this proven formula has been giving relief from pain and stiffness to all breeds and ages of dogs.

The symptoms of hip dysplasia are almost identical to the symptoms of arthritis. A dog with arthritis will limp when walking and may avoid any movement that requires full extension or the flexing of its rear legs. The dog will also experience stiffness and pain in the rear legs after exercising or when awakening in the morning. Climbing stairs will become difficult or impossible. As hip dysplasia increasingly impairs the dogs movement it will lose most of its muscle tone and may need assistance in getting up and lying down.

Hip dysplasia is primarily a disease of large breeds like Golden Retrievers, Labrador Retrievers, German Shepherds, Rottweilers, Saint Bernards, and Great Danes. The disease can affect medium-sized dogs also but very rarely affects smaller dogs. Hip dysplasia occurs most often in purebred dogs but is known to develop in mixed breeds if the parents were prone to developing hip dysplasia.

Obesity will increase the pain and inflammation of hip dysplasia in dogs that are genetically predisposed to the disease. An overweight dog genetically prone to hip dysplasia is at a much higher risk of developing hip dysplasia.

Exercise is sometimes a factor in the development of the disease. Dogs that are genetically predisposed to hip dysplasia will have an increased incidence of hip dysplasia or arthritis if over-exercised when they are puppies or young adults.

Find Out More About Hip Dysplasia & Your Dogs Health.

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Hip Dysplasia in Great Danes

Tuesday, December 28th, 2010


Hip dysplasia is a debilitating disease that affects the hip joints in dogs. It is commonly found among large breed dogs but also can occur in medium and small size breeds. Certain breeds like Great Danes are more susceptible to hip dysplasia, and the disease is more common in pure-bred dogs than in mixed breeds.

Hip dysplasia is caused by the malformation of the hip in a dog. This usually occurs at a young age when they are still growing and the bones are being formed. The ball and socket of the hip joint grows unevenly, causing the right and left hind legs to become affected. This usually happens as a result of the muscles, ligaments and connective tissues surrounding and supporting the hip joint becoming lax. Instead of the bones growing towards each other, they grow apart as the ligament and capsule holding the bones together become strained and stretched. The bones are no longer in alignment and put pressure on the nerves, which causes the symptoms and signs associated with the disease.

Symptoms of hip dysplasia include moving more slowly, difficulty in getting up or lying down, reluctance to walk, jump or play, refusing to use stairs or get into the car, muscle atrophy, limping, yelping when touched, changes in appetite, and personality changes. Both older and younger dogs suffering from hip dysplasia feel the most discomfort in cold, damp weather.

Great Danes who develop hip dysplasia or arthritis suffer from pain and stiffness in their joints which greatly diminishes their ability to live a quality life and remain active. They feel pain after exercising and during their normal daily activities. Their hind legs tend to be stiff during and after exercising. They may also find it hard to stand on their hind feet in the morning and often try to avoid putting any pressure at all on their hind legs. If it gets too painful a dog will find it hard to stand up without help from a human.

When a Great Dane is diagnosed with hip dysplasia and the choices for treatment seem limited to expensive surgery or questionable drugs, I recommend you begin treating your dog with Winston’s Joint System, an all-natural formula developed by a Naturopathic Doctor to heal his own beloved dog. This proven formula has been giving relief from pain and stiffness to all breeds and ages of dogs for more than 20 years.

Although there is no actual cure for canine hip dysplasia, arthritis, or osteochondrosis (OCD), regular treatment with Winston’s Joint System will give immediate and long-term relief without drugs.

Winston’s is a combination of three, totally-natural whole food supplements developed by a Naturopathic Doctor for his own dog. There are no side-effects because it’s just good whole food. In addition, there are no dosage problems because the dog’s body uses only what it needs.

Although canine hip dysplasia (CHD) may remain unseen in some dogs, early detection is critical. The first step to determining whether a Great Dane has hip dysplasia is through a careful physical examination by a veterinarian who will observe the dog as it sits, stands, and walks. This is the first measure to check for characteristic signs of hip dysplasia such as a side-to-side swinging gait, lameness, and arched back which is caused by shifting weight forward, or the presence of overdeveloped front-leg and shoulder muscles.

X-rays are the easiest way to diagnose hip dysplasia in a dog. A vet will evaluate the joints and take into consideration any symptoms like those listed above because sometimes an x-ray won’t reveal the full extent of the dog’s pain. The vet will also consider the dog’s movements and any evidence of lameness before making a diagnosis.

The veterinarian will move the dog’s hip joint to assess its range of motion and check for pain with the joint extended. The vet will also listen for the “click” of the hip popping out of joint and for any grating sound of bone on bone that indicates cartilage loss.

A Great Dane is a wonderful, proud animal and deserves the love and attention of a caring owner. When hip dysplasia, arthritis, or OCD strikes, the first thing to do is schedule a visit to your vet. If surgery is not recommended then you should start your dog on a regimen of Winston’s Joint System.

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Hip Dysplasia in German Shepherds

Tuesday, December 21st, 2010


To better understand what it means when your veterinarian diagnoses hip dysplasia in your German Shepherd, it helps to have at least a cursory knowledge of the basics of this debilitating condition.

According to the Orthopedic Foundation for Animals, approximately 15 percent of all German Shepherds born between 2000 and 2002 were diagnosed as suffering from hip dysplasia.

Hip dysplasia is caused whenever a looseness occurs in the joint between the femur and pelvis. Over time this looseness causes damage to the femoral head and to the socket and they no longer fit together properly. Osteoarthritis, or degenerative joint disease (DJD), often accompanies hip dysplasia, causing additional pain and disability. This damage then causes arthritic changes in the joint which reduces the range of motion and causes pain and inflammation.

Some of the symptoms and signs of hip dysplasia are:
Moving more slowly
Difficulty getting up and lying down
Weight shift to another leg
Personality change
Reluctance to walk, jump or play
Refusing to use stairs or get in the car
Change in appetite
Change in behavior
Muscle atrophy
Yelping when touched
Limping

Hip dysplasia is considered to be the most common inherited orthopedic disease in large dog breeds and millions of dogs are affected by it. Currently there is no genetic test for hip dysplasia due to its complex genetic nature.

German Shepherds with almost identical genetic makeups may have a wide range of differences in what degree of hip dysplasia they display as adults. This fact can be attributed to the differences of environmental influences on the development of the hip joint, and especially the effect of diet on puppies and young German Shepherds.

Proper nutrition is essential for the development of a strong healthy dog. However, poor or excessive nutrition can exacerbate genetic tendencies to develop hip dysplasia.

Although there is no actual cure for canine hip dysplasia, arthritis, or osteochondrosis (OCD), regular treatment with Winston’s Joint System will give immediate and long-term relief without drugs.

Winston’s is a combination of three, totally-natural whole food supplements developed by a Naturopathic Doctor for his own dog. There are no side-effects because it’s just good whole food. In addition, there are no dosage problems because the dog’s body uses only what it needs.

Although canine hip dysplasia (CHD) may remain unseen in some dogs, early detection is critical. The first step to determining whether a German Shepherd has hip dysplasia is through a careful physical examination by a veterinarian who will observe the dog as it sits, stands, and walks. This is the first measure to check for characteristic signs of hip dysplasia such as a side-to-side swinging gait, lameness, and arched back which is caused by shifting weight forward, or the presence of overdeveloped front-leg and shoulder muscles.

X-rays are the easiest way to diagnose hip dysplasia. A vet will evaluate the joints and take into consideration any symptoms like those listed above because sometimes an x-ray won’t reveal the full extent of the dog’s pain. The vet will also consider the dog’s movements and any evidence of lameness before making a diagnosis.

The veterinarian will move the dog’s hip joint to assess its range of motion and check for pain with the joint extended. The vet will also listen for the “click” of the hip popping out of joint and for any grating sound of bone on bone that indicates cartilage loss.

At the first signs of hip dysplasia, make an appointment with your veterinarian and discuss with him or her the symptoms you have been noticing in your dog. The sooner you can begin treatment, the less pain your beloved dog will experience and you may be lucky enough to extend the life of your friend and companion.

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Hip Dysplasia in Labradors

Tuesday, December 14th, 2010


Hip dysplasia in Labradors is a genetic disease that can cause crippling, lameness and severe arthritic pain in a dog’s joints. For Labradors that are genetically prone to hip dysplasia, symptoms can occur in puppies that are just a few months old or they can strike later in a dog’s life.

There are a number of causative factors that determine whether a dog will develop hip dysplasia. The most important being the genetic make-up of the dog (whether its parents and grand-parents had hip dysplasia), the type of diet being fed the dog, and obesity, which puts additional strain and weight on hip joints that become weak from hip dysplasia, arthritis, or osteochondrosis (OCD).

It is not possible to predict when or even if hip dysplasia will occur in a dog, however, there are some easily noticeable symptoms of hip dysplasia which include moving more slowly, difficulty in getting up or lying down, reluctance to walk, jump or play, refusing to use stairs or get into the car, muscle atrophy, limping, yelping when touched, changes in appetite, and personality changes.

Labradors who develop hip dysplasia, arthritis or OCD, suffer from pain and stiffness in their joints which greatly diminishes their ability to live a quality life and remain active.

When a Lab is diagnosed with hip dysplasia and the choices for treatment seem limited to expensive surgery or questionable drugs, I recommend you begin treating your dog with Winston’s Joint System, an all-natural formula developed by a Naturopathic Doctor to heal his own beloved dog. This proven formula has been giving relief from pain and stiffness to all breeds and ages of dogs for more than 20 years.

All Labradors have different temperaments, different pain thresholds and different bodies. Some may be able to cope with the pain and discomfort for a long time before showing any signs of hip dysplasia or arthritis.

X-rays are the easiest way to diagnose hip dysplasia in a dog. A vet will evaluate the joints and take into consideration any symptoms like those listed above because sometimes an x-ray won’t reveal the full extent of the dog’s pain. The vet will also consider the dog’s movements and any evidence of lameness before making a diagnosis.

Although there is no actual cure for canine hip dysplasia, arthritis, or osteochondrosis (OCD), regular treatment with Winston’s Joint System will give immediate and long-term relief without drugs.

Winston’s is a combination of three, totally-natural whole food supplements developed by a Naturopathic Doctor for his own dog. There are no side-effects because it’s just good whole food. In addition, there are no dosage problems because the dog’s body uses only what it needs.

Exercise and weight control are also vitally important. A dog’s weight, together with exercise, helps in the development of cartilage growth and aids in reducing pain and discomfort.

Surgery is normally only considered in cases of Labrador hip dysplasia if all other treatments have failed to improve the dog’s condition. This procedure is expensive and the recovery time for a dog can be considerably lengthened if the post-surgical dog is not cared for properly. The desired result of any surgical procedure is to provide an acceptable quality of life for the Lab, so surgery should be considered only if a vet is reasonably certain of success.

The most successful joint modification surgery involves reshaping or replacing the femur, or realigning the hip socket. This surgery is only recommended for younger dogs. Older and heavier dogs who suffer from hip dysplasia are generally not considered good candidates for the surgery. There is a fairly high incidence of mortality for older dogs undergoing this procedure and that is something you need to discuss frankly with your vet if surgery is recommended.

You want your beautiful Lab to be with you as long as possible so please watch for any signs or symptoms of hip dysplasia or arthritis, and begin early treatment of your pet with Winston’s Joint System.

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