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We are specialists in the treatment of canine joint disease and its accompanying pain.

Let us help put an end to your dog’s suffering, joint stiffness, pain, immobility, and poor quality of life. Our proven products will help you easily accomplish this without the use of drugs or invasive surgery.

Joint Issues

  • Hip Dysplasia
  • Arthritis
  • Osteochondritis (OCD)
  • Stiffness/Inflammation
  • Ligament Tears
  • Growing Pains
  • Mobility Problems
  • Joint Pain
  • Back/Spinal Problems
  • Hypertrophic Osteodystrophy (HOD)

Symptoms

Is your pet becoming less active, less playful, or desiring shorter walks? The following symptoms could be early signs of OCD, Arthritis or Hip Dysplasia.

  • Moving more slowly
  • Difficulty getting up
  • Weight shift to another leg
  • Personality change
  • Reluctant to walk, jump or play
  • Refuses using stairs or the car
  • Change in appetite
  • Change in behavior
  • Muscle atrophy
  • Lagging behind
  • Yelping when touched
  • Limping
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Posts Tagged ‘Lethargy in Dogs’

Thyroid Problems in Dogs

Monday, September 22nd, 2014


Thyroid problems in dogs are often difficult to recognize because the symptoms are so subtle. You might notice a change in the level of your dog’s energy, weight gain, or severe skin problems, but not associate these changes with anything serious that you should be concerned about. To detect thyroid problems a dog needs a blood test before the symptoms can be correctly diagnosed as a thyroid problem.

Hypothyroidism is a common illness in dogs and occurs when not enough thyroid hormones are produced in the animal’s body. The thyroid hormone has many functions and the most important is to regulate metabolism. Weight gain then becomes one of the most noticeable symptoms of hypothyroidism.

Approximately 90 percent of hypothyroidism cases are caused by a genetic autoimmune disease called thyroiditis, which produces anti-thyroid antibodies in the dog’s body. Sometimes the disease will develop as early as puberty even though the clinical signs won’t appear until later in a dog’s life.

Hypothyroidism most commonly affects dogs from four to ten years of age, especially large breed dogs. Miniature and toy breeds are very seldom affected.

Symptoms of hypothyroidism include weight loss, an elevated heart rate, increased urination, hyperactivity, lethargy, excessive hair loss and shedding, an intolerance for exercise – especially in colder weather – a low heart rate, and sudden changes in behavior such as increased aggression. All dogs suffering from hypothyroidism don’t display the full range of these symptoms, and some may exhibit only a few mild symptoms in the early stages of the disease.

In more serious cases, a dog may have seizures, chronic hepatitis, cardiac irregularities, or a loss of smell or taste.

To detect and diagnose hypothyroidism, a vet will do a blood test called a T4 panel which measures the level of thyroid hormones in the blood. A dog that tests positive for thyroid disease will require medication to regulate the thyroid hormones for the rest of its life.

More than 50 different breeds of dogs are genetically predisposed to developing thyroid problems. No matter which breed of dog you have, if these symptoms become noticeable and last for a protracted period of time, you should have your dog tested before the disease can cause serious damage.

How To Know When Your Dog Has an Allergy

Monday, February 17th, 2014

Allergies in dogs are very common and a pet who has allergies can exhibit many different symptoms. Here’s a quick guide to help you know when your dog has an allergy. If you notice that your dog has several of the symptoms listed below, you should schedule a visit to your veterinarian for testing as soon as possible.

1. Licking or Biting its Paws
Itchy paws may be a sign that a dog has fleas. Fleas are tiny parasites that can cause allergies. When a dog has fleas, it licks and bites at its paws trying to relieve the itchiness. If not treated promptly with a flea and tick treatment, the behavior can become obsessive.

2. Searching Out Cool Places to Lie Down
Due to the extreme itchiness almost everywhere on the body, a dog will seek out cooler places like tile floors, cement sidewalks or porches to help relieve the discomfort. The coolness helps bring temporary relief from the itching.

3. Excessive Scratching
An allergic dog will scratch at its skin more than usual, sometimes so hard that it results in wounds and bleeding which can lead to infections. Hair loss can also be a result of excessive scratching as the dog continues to scratch the same spot repeatedly.

4. Lethargy
Since allergies weaken a dog, it will be noticeably lethargic and less interested in its usual activities.

5. Lack of Appetite
If a dog is affected by allergies, its appetite will be diminished and sometimes it may even refuse to eat at all. If this happens only a few times, and the dog otherwise seems okay, the refusal to eat could be due to several other causes, many of which are normal occurrences and nothing to be concerned about. However, repeatedly refusing to eat over a period of a few days could be indicative of something even more serious than an allergy.

6. Aggressiveness
Because allergies cause a dog considerable discomfort, its behavior will change. A dog may become irritable and aggressive, reacting adversely to the kind of attention it normally enjoys.

The above symptoms may also be accompanied by watery eyes, dry and flaky skin, breathing difficulties, swelling of the limbs and nasal discharges.

It’s important to know when your dog has an allergy and be able identify the cause of the allergy as soon as possible to reduce its exposure to whatever is causing the allergic reaction.

Senility and Cognitive Dysfunction in Older Dogs

Monday, July 16th, 2012


If lately you’ve been noticing that your older dog is exhibiting ‘behavior problems’ , your pet may be developing a syndrome called ‘Canine Cognitive Dysfunction’ (CCD) or ‘Cognitive Dysfunction Syndrome’ (CDS). This dysfunction or syndrome affects older dogs the same way that Alzheimer’s disease affects humans. Recent medical studies have revealed that many older dogs with behavior problems have lesions in their brains similar to those that are seen in Alzheimer’s patients.

According to Pfizer Pharmaceutical, 62% of dogs who are 10 years of age and older will experience at least some of the following symptoms, which could indicate Canine Cognitive Dysfunction:

* Confusion or disorientation: your dog may get lost in his own back yard, or wander aimlessly in the house and become trapped in corners or behind furniture
* Decreased level of activity
* A decrease in attentiveness or long periods of just staring into space
* Doesn’t seem to recognize family members or old friends
* Pacing during the night, or a change in sleeping patterns, including inability to sleep at night
* Loss of house-trained faculties. A previously house trained dog may begin forgetting to let you know he has to go outside and may urinate or defecate inside the house when he would not have done so before.

Other signs of cognitive dysfunction may include:
* Anxiety and increased irritability
* An increase in barking or howling
* Lethargy or boredom
* Decreased ability to perform certain tasks or respond to commands.

To make a diagnosis of Canine Cognitive Dysfunction, your vet will have to first rule out any other possible causes of your dog’s behavior problems. For example, decreased activity may not be caused by Cognitive Canine Disorder but may be due to an advancing arthritic condition or hip dysplasia which can be successfully treated with Winston’s Joint System. Dogs suffering with joint diseases such as arthritis, bursitis, osteochondrosis (OCD), hip dysplasia and other degenerative problems with the shoulders, elbows and hocks can now experience immediate and long-term relief without drugs. Winston’s Joint System is a combination of three, totally-natural whole food supplements developed by a Naturopathic Doctor for his own dog. There are no side-effects because it’s all just good whole food. There are no dosage problems because your dog’s body uses only what it needs.

If your veterinarian determines that your older dog is suffering from Canine Cognitive Dysfunction, a treatment for this disorder will probably be recommended. The drugs Selegiline and Anipryl, although not a cure, can alleviate some of the symptoms of Canine Cognitive Dysfunction in older dogs. If your dog responds to either of these drugs, it will need to be treated daily for the rest of its life. As with all medications, there are side effects. It is important that you ask your vet about any possible side effects before deciding on treatment with these drugs.

Other management techniques may include the use of antioxidants or ‘senior’ diets. An excellent supplement for aging senior dogs is Winston’s Senior Complete Multi vitamin and mineral supplement, a powerful and complete once-daily multi vitamin for dogs 5 years and older. This complete multi vitamin contains almost 50 active ingredients from the healthiest sources available.

It is also important that older dogs with Canine Cognitive Dysfunction continue to receive regular exercise and play. If your older dog is experiencing behavior problems, talk to your veterinarian about ways to help your dog have a more happy and healthy life in his senior years.

 
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