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The #1 source for immediate, long-term relief for dogs suffering from degenerative diseases like hip dysplasia, OCD and arthritis.

We are specialists in the treatment of canine joint disease and its accompanying pain.

Let us help put an end to your dog’s suffering, joint stiffness, pain, immobility, and poor quality of life. Our proven products will help you easily accomplish this without the use of drugs or invasive surgery.

Joint Issues

  • Hip Dysplasia
  • Arthritis
  • Osteochondritis (OCD)
  • Stiffness/Inflammation
  • Ligament Tears
  • Growing Pains
  • Mobility Problems
  • Joint Pain
  • Back/Spinal Problems
  • Hypertrophic Osteodystrophy (HOD)

Symptoms

Is your pet becoming less active, less playful, or desiring shorter walks? The following symptoms could be early signs of OCD, Arthritis or Hip Dysplasia.

  • Moving more slowly
  • Difficulty getting up
  • Weight shift to another leg
  • Personality change
  • Reluctant to walk, jump or play
  • Refuses using stairs or the car
  • Change in appetite
  • Change in behavior
  • Muscle atrophy
  • Lagging behind
  • Yelping when touched
  • Limping
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Posts Tagged ‘Degenerative Joint Disease’

Can Hip Dysplasia be Prevented?

Monday, February 3rd, 2014

Hip dysplasia is a condition that affects mainly large breeds of dogs like Golden Retrievers, Labrador Retrievers, Great Danes, and German Shepherds. There is a strong genetic link for dogs with hip dysplasia and their offspring.

When it comes to preventing hip dysplasia, researchers agree that only the careful breeding of a dog can help prevent this debilitating disease. Selective breeding of dogs with no known hip problems in their lineage can significantly reduce the chances of their offspring developing hip dysplasia. Breeding two dogs with no hip joint problems doesn’t always guarantee that the offspring will be free of hip dysplasia, but it usually results in a much lower rate of occurrence than if two dogs with poor hip joints were bred together.

If all dog breeders were responsible and only bred dogs with excellent hip joints, hip dysplasia would be much less likely to occur. And if people purchased only dogs and puppies whose parents and grandparents had no hip joint problems, then the majority of the troubles caused by hip dysplasia would be eliminated. If you’re contemplating buying a pet dog from a breeder, the best way to lower the possibility of choosing a dog that will develop hip dysplasia as it gets older is to examine the prevalence of hip dysplasia in the dog’s lineage. Also try to obtain information on the parents and grandparents going back as many generations as possible.

If the breed of dog you want is predisposed to the development of hip dysplasia, you need to be aware that inadequate nutrition, incorrect exercising, and increased body weight all contribute to the earlier onset and severity of hip dysplasia.

Before choosing a particular dog as a pet and loving companion, investigate its lineage for any diseases that the dog may be pre-disposed to. As the years progress and you and your dog have become close companions, the last thing you’ll want is the heartbreak of having to euthanize your pet because it’s suffering terribly from the debilitating pain of hip dysplasia.

When choosing your new pet check its lineage and be sure you’re not setting yourself up for disappointment and remorse in the future.

Find Out How To Help Your Dog If They Suffer From Hip Dysplasia

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Hip Dysplasia in Dogs:Causes and Symptoms

Monday, August 12th, 2013

Hip Dysplasia in dogs is a disease that affects the hip joint that attaches a dog’s hind leg to its body. The hip joint is a ball-and-socket joint with the ball portion being the head of the femur (the main bone in the thigh) and the socket which is attached to the dog’s pelvis.

In a healthy, normal joint, the ball rotates easily within the socket. The hip joint is strengthened by a strong ligament that attaches the femur head directly to the socket. The joint capsule is a very strong band of connective tissue that circles the two bones and provides stability for a dog’s rear legs. In healthy dogs, the area where the bones actually touch each other is smooth and cushioned with a layer of spongy cartilage. The hip joint also contains a thick fluid that keeps the joint lubricated. In a dog with normal hips, all of these components work together and help the joint function smoothly to support the dog’s stability.

Hip dysplasia is a result of abnormal joint structure in the dog’s hip which results in the muscles becoming slack; it also affects the connective tissue and ligaments that support the hip joint. As the dog’s hip joint continues to deteriorate, the surfaces of the two hip bones start to separate in the joint and cause structural changes in the surfaces of the bone. As the cartilage is progressively worn away, the pain becomes intense when the dog stands or walks.

Most dogs are born with normal hips and will never develop this debilitating disease unless their genetic background includes a predisposition for hip dysplasia or arthritis. Hip dysplasia will sometimes affect both the right and left hip joints but more often only affects one hip.

Hip dysplasia symptoms usually don’t appear until a dog reaches middle-age or older. The disorder will get worse until all normal movements of the dog’s legs become too painful to endure. Surgery is sometimes recommended by veterinarians but is costly and not often advised if a dog is older. Rimadyl is a pain killer vets sometimes prescribe for dogs suffering from hip dysplasia and/or arthritis.

There are many pros and cons about giving a dog Rimadyl for hip dysplasia and arthritis pain. As a responsible pet owner, it would be a very good idea to research this drug as thoroughly as you can before giving your dog this medication. A much safer treatment, and one that many owners agree is more effective, is to put your dog on a daily regimen of Winston’s Joint System, an all-natural formula developed by a Naturopathic Doctor to heal his own beloved dog who suffered from hip dysplasia. For more than 20 years this proven formula has been giving relief from pain and stiffness to all breeds and ages of dogs.

The symptoms of hip dysplasia are almost identical to the symptoms of arthritis. A dog with arthritis will limp when walking and may avoid any movement that requires full extension or the flexing of its rear legs. The dog will also experience stiffness and pain in the rear legs after exercising or when awakening in the morning. Climbing stairs will become difficult or impossible. As hip dysplasia increasingly impairs the dogs movement it will lose most of its muscle tone and may need assistance in getting up and lying down.

Hip dysplasia is primarily a disease of large breeds like Golden Retrievers, Labrador Retrievers, German Shepherds, Rottweilers, Saint Bernards, and Great Danes. The disease can affect medium-sized dogs also but very rarely affects smaller dogs. Hip dysplasia occurs most often in purebred dogs but is known to develop in mixed breeds if the parents were prone to developing hip dysplasia.

Obesity will increase the pain and inflammation of hip dysplasia in dogs that are genetically predisposed to the disease. An overweight dog genetically prone to hip dysplasia is at a much higher risk of developing hip dysplasia.

Exercise is sometimes a factor in the development of the disease. Dogs that are genetically predisposed to hip dysplasia will have an increased incidence of hip dysplasia or arthritis if over-exercised when they are puppies or young adults.

Find Out More About Hip Dysplasia & Your Dogs Health.

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Senility and Cognitive Dysfunction in Senior Dogs

Monday, May 20th, 2013

If you notice that your older dog is exhibiting behavior problems, it may be senility or cognitive dysfunction that accounts for the behavior. Senility and cognitive dysfunction affects dogs in the same way that Alzheimer’s disease affects humans. Recent medical studies have shown that many senior dogs with senility and cognitive dysfunction problems have lesions in their brains that are very similar to what is seen in Alzheimer’s patients.

Studies undertaken by major companies in the pet industry have revealed that 62% of all dogs ten years of age and older will experience at least some of the following symptoms, which usually indicate canine cognitive dysfunction:

* Confusion or disorientation that causes a dog to get lost in its own yard, or to wander aimlessly around the house, and become trapped in a corner or behind furniture.
* An obvious decreased level of activity.
* Constant pacing during the night, or being unable to sleep at night.
* Anxiety and increased irritability.
* An increase in barking, whining, or howling.
* A decreased ability to perform common tasks or to respond to its owners’ commands.
* Long periods of inattentiveness, appearing to just stare into space.
* A continuing inability to recognize family members or old friends.

To make the correct diagnosis of senility or cognitive dysfunction, a veterinarian first has to rule out other possible causes of the dog’s behavior problems. A marked decrease in activity may not be caused by senility or cognitive dysfunction, but might be due to advancing arthritis or hip dysplasia that could be successfully treated with Winston’s Joint System. Dogs who suffer from severe joint diseases such as arthritis, bursitis, osteochondrosis (OCD), hip dysplasia or other degenerative problems with the shoulders, elbows and hocks are able to experience immediate and long-term relief without dangerous drugs when given a daily regimen of Winston’s Joint System. Winston’s is a combination of three, totally-natural whole food supplements developed by a Naturopathic Doctor for his own dog. There are no side-effects and there are no dosage problems because your dog’s body uses only what it needs.

If it is determined that your dog does not have physical problems and is suffering from senility or cognitive dysfunction, a vet will probably prescribe one of the major drugs, Selegiline or Anipry. These drugs are not a cure for senility or cognitive dysfunction but can alleviate some of the symptoms. If a dog responds well to either of these drugs, it will need to be given the medication every day for the rest of its life. There are some unpleasant side effects with these two drugs so it’s important to ask your vet what these side effects are and how dangerous they might be to your pet before you decide on administering these drugs to your dog.

An excellent supplement that can help aging dogs is Winston’s Senior Complete Multi vitamin and mineral supplement. This is a powerful and complete once-daily multi vitamin for dogs that are five years and older. This complete multi vitamin contains almost 50 active ingredients from the healthiest sources available.

It’s vitally important that dogs who are diagnosed with senility or cognitive dysfunction continue to be exercised and played with on a regular basis. If your senior dog is experiencing behavior problems, schedule an appointment with your veterinarian to have your dog tested and evaluated to determine if senility or cognitive dysfunction is accounting for the drastic change in behavior.

Early intervention and proper, loving care can help your dog have a more happy and healthy life in its senior years.

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Arthritis in Dogs: Causes, Symptoms and Treatments

Monday, May 6th, 2013

Arthritis in dogs is a debilitating condition affecting approximately 20% of all adult dogs. Arthritis generally develops when a dog is older but it can also affect younger dogs. In order to provide a better quality of life for a dog with arthritis a dog owner needs to understand arthritis, its symptoms, and what treatments are available for an affected dog.

Arthritis is a general term that is used to describe several different diseases that basically affect a dog’s joints in similar ways. A simple way to describe and to understand arthritis in a dog is that the disease causes painful inflammation of the dog’s joints. Because arthritis occurs in about one in five adult dogs, it is one of the most common diseases treated by veterinarians.

Since arthritis itself is more of a general condition rather than one specific disease, many other diseases like hip dysplasia, OCD, and degenerative joint disease are linked to it. A dog with arthritis will usually develop hip dysplasia or degenerative joint disease as the arthritis progresses.

Arthritis associated with degenerative joint disease is caused by repetitive pressure on a dog’s bones and is common to aging dogs. This type of arthritis can occur in younger dogs if they are genetically predisposed to the affliction. However, it’s more common in older dogs because their joints become lax after many years of use. Because this type of arthritis is normally age-related, the treatment options are limited to alleviating the symptoms.

In some cases, the arthritis is associated with an autoimmune disorder where the immune system mistakenly begins attacking the dog’s muscles and bones, thereby reducing the functioning of the joints and causing inflammation and irritation. There often is a genetic predisposition toward this type of arthritis in certain breeds. Whether or not an affected dog is among those breeds is not important; it is imperative that a veterinarian determine why the dog’s immune system is malfunctioning and start the appropriate treatment as soon as the malady is diagnosed.

Signs and symptoms of arthritis in a dog will usually manifest over time, unless an autoimmune disease is the cause. Also, these signs or symptoms are often mistaken for other disorders.

    The following symptoms may indicate arthritis in a dog

* Limping
* Obvious favoring of one leg over the other
* Avoiding the use of stairs
* A painful appearance when walking
* A progressive unwillingness to exercise, play, or go for the usual walk
* Urinating or defecating inside the house after being housebroken for many years.

A veterinarian will decide on treatment options after conducting several tests on the dog to try to determine what factors are contributing to the disorder. The tests will include x-rays, blood work and occasionally an ultrasound.
Dietary restrictions are often an integral part of any treatment for arthritis, since a reduction in weight helps alleviate some of the symptoms of arthritis in overweight dogs. A regular, easygoing exercise routine will be recommended to prevent too much pressure being placed on the dog’s weakening joints.

Non-steroidal, anti-inflammatory medications like Rimadyl are sometimes used to help reduce inflammation in the dog’s joints. Rimadyl is a pain killer that veterinarians sometimes prescribe for dogs suffering from arthritis.
There are many pros and cons about giving a dog Rimadyl for arthritis pain. As a responsible pet owner, it would be a very good idea to research this drug as thoroughly as you can before giving your dog the medication.

A much safer treatment, and one that many owners and vets agree is more effective, is to start an arthritic dog on a daily regimen of Winston’s Joint System, an all-natural formula developed by a Naturopathic Doctor to heal his own beloved dog who suffered from arthritis and hip dysplasia. This proven formula has been giving relief from pain and stiffness to all breeds and ages of dogs for over 20 years with remarkable results.

Arthritis in dogs can have many causes and the symptoms are sometimes misdiagnosed as being another condition or ailment of an affected dog. The treatments for arthritis are limited, and many dog owners prefer the safety of a supplement like Winston’s Joint System rather than the sometimes questionable efficacy of a drug like Rimadyl.

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Joint Disease in Dogs

Monday, March 11th, 2013

It’s inevitable that many dogs will develop some form of joint disease during their lives. It may be mild and unnoticeable, or it could be debilitating, severely affecting a dog’s quality of life by causing complete lameness and the inability to get up and down without help.

Some dogs will develop joint disease in the first few years of their lives but not display any visible signs until much later in life. This is often dependent on the dog’s breed. Dogs are also very susceptible to arthritis, and larger dog breeds are more vulnerable than smaller breeds.

The most common signs of joint disease in a dog include stiffness, limping, or favoring one limb over another. After awakening from sleep a dog with joint disease may find it difficult to get up or be reluctant to climb stairs.

Diseases that can affect a dog’s joints fall into ten major classifications. These joint diseases occur as a result of (1) ligament, tendon, or muscle disease, (2) bone fractures involving the joint, (3) dietary and hormonal diseases such as hyperparathyroidism and obesity, (4) developmental disorders like hip dysplasia and elbow dysplasia or OCD, (5) congenital disorders, (6) metabolic disorders, (7) cancer, (8) inflammatory joint diseases like Lyme disease or rheumatoid arthritis, (9) degenerative joint disease (osteoarthritis), and (10) degenerative spinal joint disease.

The treatment of hip dysplasia and osteoarthritis has vastly improved with the introduction of supplements like Winston’s Joint System. Because hip dysplasia is primarily an inherited condition, there is no product on the market that can prevent its development, only treat it. Dogs with hip dysplasia will need to be fed a proper diet and be put on a limited exercise routine. There are anti-inflammatories like Rimadyl that are used to relieve a dog’s pain. Since Rimadyl and other drugs are controlled substances, they are available only through veterinarians. Unfortunately, drugs like Rimadyl cannot decrease the progression of degenerative joint disease and often have serious side effects. You should consult with your vet and learn about all the possible side effects before agreeing to treat your dog with prescription medications such as Rimadyl.

Surgery is sometimes performed on dogs with serious cases of hip dysplasia. These surgeries are not always able to stop the progression of hip dysplasia and some dogs benefit only by having their lives made a little more comfortable. Because of the high cost of this type of surgery and the questionable value of performing the procedure on older dogs, the management of pain and inflammation remains the only realistic option for many pet owners.

Weight management is very important for all dogs suffering from hip dysplasia. If surgery or other medical procedure is deemed necessary, the results will be more beneficial if the dog is not overweight. Up to half of the dogs in the U.S. are overweight, so chances are very good that dogs with hip dysplasia or osteoarthritis are also overweight. Helping a dog lose pounds and get back to its recommended weight is one of the most important things a dog owner can do to help their pet who is suffering from hip dysplasia or arthritis.

Dogs who are overweight and are diagnosed with hip dysplasia or arthritis need to be exercised in ways that provide a good range of motion and muscle building, while limiting wear and tear on the dog’s joints. Walking, swimming, slow jogging, and going up and down stairs are excellent low-impact exercises. An exercise program should be tailored to a dog based on the severity of the hip dysplasia or osteoarthritis. The dog’s weight and physical condition must be factored into planning the types of exercise it should be subjected to. The wrong type of exercise can cause harm to the dog. A veterinarian will be able to recommend the best exercise program that’s appropriate for the dog’s condition.

Glucosamine and chondroitin are two supplements commonly used to treat animals for osteoarthritis. They are effective on some dogs but not on all dogs. Glucosamine is the major sugar found in the important building blocks necessary for the synthesis and maintenance of joint cartilage. Chondroitin enhances this synthesis and prevents damage of enzymes in the joint. These products are not painkillers.

Glucosamine and chondroitin work on the dog’s cartilage-forming cells in an attempt to repair the damaged cartilage. These products take at least six weeks to begin their healing, and if successful, a dog will need to continue taking the products for the rest of their lives to prevent further cartilage breakdown.

Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have been developed for dogs with osteoarthritis. Carprofen, marketed as Rimadyl is the best known of these medications. It is a strong painkiller and anti-inflammatory agent, and is available only by prescription because of its potential for serious side effects.

A much safer treatment for dogs suffering with joint diseases such as arthritis, bursitis, osteochondrosis (OCD), hip dysplasia and other degenerative joint disease is Winston’s Joint System, a combination of three, totally-natural whole food supplements developed by a Naturopathic Doctor for his own dog. Winston’s contains no potentially dangerous drugs. Winston’s Joint System provides many of the raw materials essential for the synthesis of the joint-lubricating synovial fluid as well as the repair of articular cartilage and connective tissue. Within the first 30 days of treatment, dogs on Winston’s show noticeable and often remarkable improvement.

Joint disease in dogs is a condition that affects such a large number of pet dogs and there is no known cure. Surgery works for some dogs but is almost prohibitively expensive. No dog should have to suffer with these debilitating diseases and that is the reason Winston’s Joint System was originally developed. If your dog has been diagnosed with arthritis, bursitis, osteochondrosis (OCD), hip dysplasia or other degenerative joint disease, you owe it to your pet to help make its life better by treating it with Winston’s proven formula.

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