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The #1 source for immediate, long-term relief for dogs suffering from degenerative diseases like hip dysplasia, OCD and arthritis.

We are specialists in the treatment of canine joint disease and its accompanying pain.

Let us help put an end to your dog’s suffering, joint stiffness, pain, immobility, and poor quality of life. Our proven products will help you easily accomplish this without the use of drugs or invasive surgery.

Joint Issues

  • Hip Dysplasia
  • Arthritis
  • Osteochondritis (OCD)
  • Stiffness/Inflammation
  • Ligament Tears
  • Growing Pains
  • Mobility Problems
  • Joint Pain
  • Back/Spinal Problems
  • Hypertrophic Osteodystrophy (HOD)

Symptoms

Is your pet becoming less active, less playful, or desiring shorter walks? The following symptoms could be early signs of OCD, Arthritis or Hip Dysplasia.

  • Moving more slowly
  • Difficulty getting up
  • Weight shift to another leg
  • Personality change
  • Reluctant to walk, jump or play
  • Refuses using stairs or the car
  • Change in appetite
  • Change in behavior
  • Muscle atrophy
  • Lagging behind
  • Yelping when touched
  • Limping
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Archive for the ‘Dog Pain | Discover Ways To Minimize Your Dogs Pain’ Category

Breathing Problems in Dogs

Monday, June 9th, 2014

Breathing problems in dogs can be caused by something as normal as sneezing, a runny nose, a cough or teary eyes. These reactions are common in dogs and nothing you should worry about. However, if you notice your dog is suddenly having difficulty breathing, it could indicate a simple respiratory infection or it may be signs of a more serious disease.

Some of the most critical breathing problems in dogs include Respiratory Cancer, Kennel cough, Pneumonia, Fungal Infections, Cryptococcosis, Valley Fever, Asthma, Laryngeal Paralysis, and Aspergillosis.

Respiratory Cancer is found less often than any other form of cancer in dogs, although it is not unheard of for tumors to form in a dog’s lungs having spread from cancer in other parts of its body. The most common form of this Respiratory Cancer occurs in a dog’s nasal sinus passages.

Kennel cough is a mild yet highly contagious disease that affects the upper respiratory system. If not treated properly it can develop into fatal bronchopneumonia or chronic bronchitis in puppies and in older inactive dogs who spend most of their time sleeping or just lying around the house.

The factors that increase a dog’s susceptibility to kennel cough are stress, temperature and humidity. For a dog to catch Kennel cough it has to inhale the bacteria that causes the disease. The most likely dog to catch the disease is one who has been kept in a shelter or kennel (hence the name) with close contact to other dogs.

Pneumonia is an inflammation of the lungs and the most common types of pneumonia are bacterial and fungal infections . You can spot a dog with pneumonia because it will have difficulty breathing, cough a lot, have a fever, and more than likely, lose its appetite.

Fungal Infections are another cause of respiratory problems in dogs.

Cryptococcosis is a systemic disease that affects a dog’s respiratory tract, its eyes, skin and central nervous system. This fungus is commonly found in soil and in chicken and bird droppings. The infection causes lesions on the face, legs and lungs and it can quickly spread to a dog’s central nervous system. Once the fungus reaches the dog’s brain, there is little hope of saving the dog.

Valley Fever affects dogs that live in dry areas of the southwestern U. S. Luckily the fungus in not very contagious and most dogs develop an immunity to it.

Asthma is a rare condition in which the air passages to a dog’s lungs fill with mucus, then swell and spasm. This limits the amount of air that can reach a dog’s lungs, causing wheezing, coughing and an inability to easily catch its breath. Asthma is fairly easy to recognize because the symptoms are the same as those in humans.

Laryngeal Paralysis symptoms include noisy breathing, an intolerance to exercise or walking, vomiting, coughing, and the inability to catch its breath. The larynx, or voice box, is located in the throat and connects the mouth and nasal passages. The muscles attached to the larynx become paralyzed due to the dysfunction of nerves in the throat and cause serious breathing problems.

If your dog’s breathing sounds like a freight train trying to climb up a steep incline, you can safely assume it has Laryngeal Paralysis. This is a disease that requires veterinarian care.

Aspergillosis is a serious disease affecting a dog’s mucous membranes and nasal chambers. It is most common in younger dogs, especially those breeds with long noses. Symptoms include sneezing, nasal pain and lethargy. If not treated, the fungus can easily grow to the point where it destroys the dog’s nasal passages and infects its skull and eyes.

Breathing problems in dogs should never be ignored. If they are, the chances of your dog’s recovery and survival will be significantly reduced if it does not receive the necessary treatment in the early stages of the disease.

Always watch for breathing problems in your dog and contact your veterinarian if any of these symptoms persist or get worse.

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Bad Foods For Dogs

Monday, June 2nd, 2014

There are certain foods that are bad for dogs and foods that are deadly to dogs. It’s vitally important you know what these foods are if you have a pet.

Grapes and Raisins
• Grapes and raisins can cause irreversible damage to the kidneys, possibly resulting in death.
• Eating as few as 4-5 grapes or raisins can be poisonous to a 20 pound dog.
• Signs of toxicity include vomiting, loss of appetite, diarrhea, abdominal pain, and decreased urine flow.
• Toxicity signs usually begin within 24 hours but can start just a few hours after consuming these foods.

Onions
• Onions can cause a form of hemolytic anemia called Heinz Body Anemia, a condition that destroys red blood cells. Kidney damage may follow.
• Similar foods such as garlic and chives are also toxic to your dog’s system.
• The quantity of onions considered to be poisonous to a dog is not clear cut, but the effects can be cumulative. Avoid feeding your pet table scraps or any foods cooked with onions.
• Signs of toxicity include pale gums, rapid heart rate, weakness and lethargy, and may be accompanied by vomiting, diarrhea, and bloody urine.
• Treatment requires blood transfusions and/or oxygen administration, followed by fluid therapy.

Chocolate
• Chocolate and cocoa are definitely bad foods for dogs as they contain a chemical called theobromide that can adversely affect the heart, lungs, kidneys and central nervous system of a dog.
• Pure baking chocolate is the most toxic form of chocolate, whereas milk chocolate requires a higher quantity to cause harm. A 20 pound dog can be poisoned after consuming only 2 ounces of baking chocolate, but it would take nearly 20 ounces of milk chocolate to cause the same effects.
• Chocolate poisoning signs include over-excitement, tremors, seizures, vomiting, diarrhea, abnormal heart rate/rhythm, hyperthermia and coma.
• Treatment by your vet may include vomiting or administration of activated charcoal with fluid therapy and medications.

Caffeinated Items
• Caffeine is similar to the toxic chemical found in chocolate. It can damage the heart, lungs, kidney and central nervous system.
• Caffeine is found in coffee beans and coffee, large amounts of tea, some energy drinks, and chocolate.
• Signs typically begin with restlessness, hyperactivity and vomiting, followed by panting, weakness, increased heart rate, muscle tremors and convulsions.
• Treatment by your vet may include vomiting or gastric lavage and administration of activated charcoal with fluid therapy and medications.

Macadamia Nuts
• Macadamia nuts, while generally not considered fatal, can cause your dog to become severely ill.
• The actually toxin in the nuts is not known, nor is the mechanism of toxicity.
• Ingestion of just a handful of Macadamia nuts can cause adverse effects in any dog.
• Signs include vomiting, weakness, depression, joint and muscle pain, and swelling of joints.
• Onset of these signs typically occurs within 6-24 hours after consuming the nuts.
• Dogs usually recover within 24-48 hours after treatment but may need to be hospitalized if they become very sick.

Xylitol
• Xylitol is a sugar-free sweetener often found in chewing gum and candy. In dogs, it stimulates the pancreas to secrete insulin, resulting in hypoglycemia (low blood sugar). Xylitol ingestion can also cause severe liver damage.
• As few as two pieces of gum can be hypoglycemic to a 20 pound dog. An entire pack of gum can cause permanent liver damage.
• Signs of toxicity can occur within 30-60 minutes after ingestion and include weakness, sudden collapse, and seizures.
• Your vet may induce vomiting or perform gastric lavage. An affected dog usually needs to be treated intravenously with dextrose (sugar) and monitored closely for 1-2 days. Many dogs improve with supportive care if treated early enough, though liver damage can be permanent.

Alcohol and Yeast Dough
• Alcoholic beverages contain ethanol – a seriously toxic chemical compound that causes central nervous system and respiratory depression in dogs.
• Uncooked yeast dough also produces ethanol.
• Even small amounts of ethanol can cause toxic effects in dogs.
• Signs include sedation, depression, lethargy, weakness, and hypothermia (low body temperature).
• Ethanol is rapidly absorbed into the system, so it is critical that you seek medical attention quickly. It is usually not helpful to induce vomiting in the dog. Proper treatment requires aggressive care with fluid therapy and medications.
• Under controlled circumstances, alcohol is used by veterinarians as an antidote for antifreeze (ethylene glycol) poisoning.

Fruit Pits and Seeds
• Apple seeds, cherry pits, peach pits, and plum pits contain the toxin cyanide.
• Signs of cyanide poisoning include vomiting, heavy breathing, apnea tachycardia, cardiac arrhythmias, coma, and skin irritation.

Food items we take for granted as humans can be bad for dogs, and may seriously injure or even kill your pet. Be a wise owner and be vigilant that your pet never consumes even small amounts of any of the above toxic foods.

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Can I Give My Dog Aspirin?

Monday, May 12th, 2014

I used to wonder if I could give my dog aspirin or if it would be too dangerous, or at least would sicken him. As humans, we know that regular aspirin is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) which helps relieve our aches and pains. But did you know that it also works well for dogs to relieve their pain.

Aspirin works by blocking a dog’s body from producing prostaglandins which are the source of pain and inflammation.

Be careful and use aspirin only as a short-term solution for pain and inflammation relief due to possible health problems it can cause. If you need to keep giving your pet aspirin to relieve its pain and inflammation, ask your vet for suggestions of long term solutions that cause fewer side effects.

A word of caution: there are other pain relievers such as acetaminophen or ibuprofen that humans can safely take, but both of these are very toxic for a dog. Only aspirin should be given dogs, and always in low doses. Most veterinarians recommend no more than 5mg to 10mg per pound of a dog’s weight, given once every 12 hours. If your dog weighs 20 pounds it should have no more than 200 milligrams once every 12 hours. A large dog weighing 75 pounds can safely take 750 milligrams once every 12 hours. Two of the regular 325 mg aspirins available in most stores would equal 650 milligrams and should be sufficient for dogs 75 pounds and up.

To avoid stomach problems or ulcers don’t give your dog aspirin until after it has eaten. Dogs often reject aspirin because of its unusual taste, so you may have to put the aspirin tablet in chunks of food or inside a favorite treat. Additionally, when aspirin is given without food, ulcers could form in the stomach. A common sign of a dog developing stomach ulcers is blood-tinged vomiting.

Vets recommend that aspirin not be administered in conjunction with steroids. If your dog has allergies and is taking corticosteroids, it should not be given aspirin nor should aspirin be given to dogs with ulcers or stomach lining problems.

The answer to the question “Can I Give My Dog Aspirin?” is not the same for puppies. Aspirin should never be given to puppies, as they lack the necessary enzymes to break down the aspirin which can result in severe organ damage. Aspirin is also not recommended for dogs that are pregnant as it could cause birth defects.

While aspirin is an effective pain reliever, it does not slow down the advancement of arthritis in a dog due to its negative effects on proteoglycan synthesis, needed for other normal bodily functions, and the long-term use of aspirin for arthritis can lead to premature degeneration of the dog’s joints.

Don’t give your dog aspirin as a long-term aid for hip dysplasia or arthritis pain. Its destructive side effects on joint cartilage and possible irritation of the stomach can result in stomach, liver and kidney damage.

A more effective and safer way to treat arthritis and hip dysplasia is with Winston’s Joint System an all-natural formula developed by a Naturopathic Doctor to heal his own beloved dog. For over 20 years, this long-proven formula has been giving relief from pain and stiffness to all breeds and ages of dogs.

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Adopt a Pomeranian as a Pet

Monday, April 28th, 2014

If you want to adopt a Pomeranian as a pet it would be a good idea to research the breed to be sure this type of dog will fit your lifestyle.

Pomeranians are cocky, animated dogs that have a distinctive extroverted personality. They are an alert and active toy breed with a fox-like expression, and they make a good companion dog as well as a competitive show dog.

Pomeranians are very intelligent dogs and a new owner will have better luck training one if they have time to devote to repetition of commands. Most pet dogs are trained using a leash but it’s much safer to use a harness rather than a leash when training a Pomeranian to avoid damaging a young puppy’s trachea (windpipe).

The Pomeranian is a true lap dog who craves your attention and is very different from an independent dog who only requires a pat on the head, good food, and a daily walk. Therefore, before choosing to adopt a Pomeranian, you’ll need to consider whether you’re going to have enough time in your days to devote solely to a dog.

Pomeranians have beautiful coats which are very easy to maintain in top condition. They have a thick double coat that requires brushing only a couple of times a week to groom out any shedding hair and avoid matting.

Pomeranians do not do well when left alone at home for long periods of time. Separation anxiety is common in this breed. If you’re a stay at home person with time to do as you wish each day, the Pomeranian is a good choice.

This breed is not a good choice for a home with small children. Since Pomeranians are very petite dogs, a young child may play too rough with it and easily cause injury.

Before you choose to adopt a Pomeranian as a pet try to spend some time around a friend’s dog, or visit an animal shelter and talk to the staff about what it’s like to own one of these cute little dogs. The worst scenario would be to adopt one of these pets and then find out you can’t or are unable to handle their demands.

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Common Infections in Dogs

Monday, April 21st, 2014

Some common infections in dogs can result in minimal problems for the health of the animal, but infections can also cause major illnesses that can be fatal. As a responsible pet owner you should be aware of these common infections and their symptoms in order to determine whether your dog is having a bout with an illness that will cure itself, or whether the symptoms are indicative of a serious disease. Early recognition and treatment of infections are your best protection against a severe illness or the death of your pet.

Rabies is one of the most common infections in dogs. The symptoms of rabies may not become noticeable for days or even months after a dog has been infected with the disease. The symptoms include refusing to eat or drink water, a high fever, seizures, and foaming at the mouth. Some dogs will exhibit what is called “mad dog syndrome.” A dog with this syndrome can become extremely aggressive and will attack humans or other dogs. Vaccination is not only your safest protection against a dog contracting rabies, but also is mandatory in almost every city and town in the U.S.

Parvovirus is another extremely contagious disease commonly found in dogs, and also requires vaccination with a follow-up shot every year. It is usually contracted through exposure to the infected feces of a dog or other animal. The symptoms of parvovirus include lethargy, vomiting blood, or diarrhea and loss of appetite.

Ear infections in dogs are more common in floppy eared dogs and dogs who spend most of their time outdoors. The symptoms include excess wax build up in the ear canals, a foul smelling odor from the dog’s ears, and pawing or scratching the ears. Ear infections can be treated with a drying cream from a pet store. Insert the cream into the dog’s ear and rub it in well. The cream will act as a drying agent and soak up the excess moisture in the dog’s ears. Serious ear infections require treatment by a veterinarian.

Distemper is a highly contagious infection that affects the respiratory, nervous and gastrointestinal systems in a dog. Like parvovirus, the infection is transmitted when an animal is exposed to feces that contain the virus. All dogs are at risk of contracting distemper, but puppies under four months of age are especially at risk. There is no cure for distemper but there are medications to help control the disease and keep it from worsening. Distemper vaccinations are also required annually for puppies and dogs.

The common cold in dogs is most commonly caused by kennel cough when an upper respiratory infection affects a dog’s lungs and sinuses. The symptoms include nasal discharge and sneezing, continual coughing spells, and great difficulty in breathing. Dogs who have strong immune systems are usually able fight off the infection before it becomes serious. Kennel cough is extremely infectious but can be treated and eradicated if caught in the early stage.

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