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The #1 source for immediate, long-term relief for dogs suffering from degenerative diseases like hip dysplasia, OCD and arthritis.

We are specialists in the treatment of canine joint disease and its accompanying pain.

Let us help put an end to your dog’s suffering, joint stiffness, pain, immobility, and poor quality of life. Our proven products will help you easily accomplish this without the use of drugs or invasive surgery.

Joint Issues

  • Hip Dysplasia
  • Arthritis
  • Osteochondritis (OCD)
  • Stiffness/Inflammation
  • Ligament Tears
  • Growing Pains
  • Mobility Problems
  • Joint Pain
  • Back/Spinal Problems
  • Hypertrophic Osteodystrophy (HOD)

Symptoms

Is your pet becoming less active, less playful, or desiring shorter walks? The following symptoms could be early signs of OCD, Arthritis or Hip Dysplasia.

  • Moving more slowly
  • Difficulty getting up
  • Weight shift to another leg
  • Personality change
  • Reluctant to walk, jump or play
  • Refuses using stairs or the car
  • Change in appetite
  • Change in behavior
  • Muscle atrophy
  • Lagging behind
  • Yelping when touched
  • Limping
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Archive for the ‘Dog Pain | Discover Ways To Minimize Your Dogs Pain’ Category

Help With Vet Bills

Monday, September 15th, 2014


In these difficult economic times many dog owners are finding that they sometimes need help paying vet bills. Fortunately, there are programs and organizations willing to help with vet bills when money is tight.

If you need spay and neuter services for your dog, most ASPCA branches often sponsor low cost spay and neuter clinics.

Many vaccination clinics set up special events during the year and offer free or inexpensive vaccines for your dog. Vaccines usually dispensed at these events include Rabies, Corona, Distemper, Hepatitis, Parvovirus, and Leptospirosis. Heartworm and parasite testing is sometimes offered free of charge also.

If your dog needs medical treatment or emergency care and you’re unable to afford such care, there are charitable organizations across the country who work with caring veterinarians to provide medical care for dogs who would otherwise go untreated.

These organizations include the following:
The American Animal Hospital Association is a companion animal veterinary association. They have a foundation called Helping Pets Fund that gives aid to sick and injured pets.

United Animal Nations which provides assistance to animal rescue organizations and helps victims of disasters, domestic violence and foreclosures to care for their pets.

Help-A-Pet assists physically and mentally challenged individuals, senior citizens and children of the working poor to provide their pets with lifesaving veterinary care.

Labrador Life Line helps individuals and rescuers care for Labrador Retrievers by providing medical assistance, supplies and transportation to foster homes and permanent homes.

The Pet Fund provides financial assistance to pet owners to help pay for medical and preventive care of a dog. The Fund also works to decrease the number of animals that end up being euthanized or surrendered to animal shelters due to preventable or treatable illnesses.

Another source of help is one of the many community food banks that accept and distribute pet food to help owners feed their pets. Local humane societies sometimes are able to provide a list of sources for low-cost or no-cost pet food.

Getting help with vet bills when you truly need it should never, and I mean never, cause you to be embarrassed. Think first of your loving companion and not your pride. Your dog needs you. You are its reason for living.

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Does a Lump Mean a Dog Has Cancer

Monday, September 1st, 2014


A lump under a dog’s skin doesn’t mean a dog has cancer and you shouldn’t be alarmed if you find your pet has developed one. However, lumps under the skin aren’t always benign, so it’s important to regularly check your dog, and if you find a lump have it tested.

According to the National Canine Cancer Foundation, 3 out of every 10 dogs will develop cancer at some point in their lifetimes. It may surprise you to know that approximately 50 percent of all dogs that die after they’re 10 years old will pass away as a result of some form of dog cancer.

If a dog is lucky enough to have an owner who is vigilant about its health, a dog receiving early cancer treatment can be cured or have years added to its life.

As a responsible dog owner, you should check your dog’s skin every few weeks for any growths. If you find one, keep close watch on it for the next week or two and see if it increases in size. It could be something as simple as an insect bite which will go away in a few days. If the lump persists or grows larger, make an appointment with your veterinarian. Any lump that seems to have suddenly appeared overnight and grown rapidly should be checked to be safe.

The vet will examine your dog, checking the size of the lump and testing to see if it causes your dog any pain. The vet will remove some of the cells in the lump using a small needle so as not to hurt the dog. The purpose of this procedure is to see if any cancerous cells are visible. However, the needle aspiration is not always accurate so most vets will want to perform a biopsy on the lump to check for cancerous cells.

The vet will surgically remove a portion of the lump and the tissue surrounding it. It’s then sent to a lab for testing. The results will tell the vet whether the lump is just a fat deposit or whether it’s malignant. If it is malignant the vet will have to remove it.

If a dog has cancer, the surgical procedure it will undergo is not complicated. First, the dog is sedated, then the area around the lump is shaved and disinfected. The dog will be given anesthesia to keep it asleep and pain free while the surgery is performed.

The doctor will use a scalpel to remove the lump and all surrounding tissue. Blood vessels feeding the lump will be cauterized or tied off, and the lump is then removed. The incision is stitched up and covered with a bandage. Most dogs will have a cone placed around their neck to prevent them from licking and scratching the wound as it heals.

Cancer is more easily treated in dogs than it is in humans. Caring and loving your pet requires you to always be on the lookout for any lumps or masses under its skin that could indicate a serious problem. Never ignore a lump that is increasing in size and hope that it will go away with the passage of time.

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Constipation in Dogs: Causes and Treatments

Monday, August 25th, 2014

Even dogs can get constipated occasionally. If you find that your dog has dry, hard stools, or seems to have a lot of difficulty with its bowel movements, the reason could be that your dog is constipated. Check with your vet to make sure your dog is suffering from ordinary constipation, and not some sort of infection.

Constipation in dogs can cause other health problems for your pet. Deadly toxins caused by the retention of feces in the intestinal system can accumulate in your dog’s body causing bloating, abdominal pain, and loss of appetite.

A lack of exercise and unsuitable diets often cause a dog to become constipated. Dogs need to be walked at least twice a day and always be fed a diet of nutritious dog food. One mistake many dog owners make is to feed their dog table scraps which can easily lead to a bout of constipation. Dogs aren’t the pickiest eaters so you need to watch your pet to make sure it doesn’t eat anything you have not given it.

Certain medications can also cause constipation in dogs. If your dog becomes constipated after being placed on a new medication you should bring it to the attention of your vet. But it’s not only prescription drugs that can cause constipation. It surprises many people to learn that over-the-counter flea remedies can also cause constipation in some dogs.

Psychological stress can also cause a dog to be constipated. If you believe stress is adversely affecting your dog, try giving it some extra attention every day.

Dehydration can also cause a dog to become constipated. Always be sure your dog has a steady supply of cool, clean water. Some vets will recommend feeding your dog 2 teaspoons of mineral oil in its water twice a day for a week to help ease the constipation. See the vet if your dog’s constipation does not go away and leads to lethargy and decreased appetite. If your dog begins to pass small amounts of blood in its stools you need to bring this to the attention of your vet as soon as possible.

For some dog owners the question is always “How do I know if my dog is really constipated?” Technically, your dog is constipated when its bowel movements are infrequent, difficult to pass, or when the stools are hard and dry.

There are various causes of constipation in dogs so it helps a dog owner to be aware when a pet begins exhibiting signs of this problem. This will aid in determining the probable cause of the ailment.

Symptoms of constipation in dogs can be recognized by the following signs:

Dry, hard feces;
Infrequent bowel movements;
Discharging only a small amount of liquid feces after straining hard to go;
Sudden loss of appetite;
Occasional vomiting;
Depression.

You can also try adding bran to your dog’s food to see if it helps promote normal bowel movements. And make sure your dog is getting its regular exercise as this stimulates good digestion and bowel movements.

If your dog becomes constipated it will be in discomfort or pain. A visit to the vet is a good idea so your pet can be examined and undergo tests like a complete blood count and urinalysis. Sometimes abdominal x-rays or an abdominal ultrasound are necessary for correct diagnosis.

If you suspect a new medication may be causing your dog’s constipation, stop giving it those medications or supplements until you can consult with your vet.

It is very important that you do not give your dog any medications made for humans or any over-the-counter medication for constipation without first talking to your veterinarian. Some medications can be very harmful to a dog’s overall health and may even result in death.

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Ear Infections in Dogs

Monday, August 11th, 2014

Chronic ear infections in dogs should be treated as soon as they are detected, because left untreated, they can result in permanent damage and hearing loss. Minor ear infections can often be treated with medication, while severe ear infections will require medical intervention by a veterinarian.

A dog’s middle and inner ear are equally susceptible to infections. The inner ear controls a dog’s sense of balance and hearing and a dog with an inner ear infection will lose its sense of balance and all or most of its hearing. If left untreated, the infection can progress to the dog’s brain and cause serious damage.

An inner ear infection in a dog is usually caused by the spread of an existing outer ear infection into the inner ear. The dark, moist environment of the inner ear can cause bacteria to multiply in the ear canal. When foreign objects or ear mites enter into a dog’s ear and the dog scratches that ear, you can almost be sure an infection will develop. Hormonal imbalances, allergies, and tumors are also known to cause ear infections. It is also possible for ear infections to be inherited from a dog’s parents and passed from generation to generation.

Dogs with droopy ears are more prone to developing ear infections than are dogs with perky, upright ears.

Symptoms of inner ear infections in dogs include:
* Odor from the ear canal
* Inflammation in the ear canal
* Violent shaking of the head
* Scratching the head and ear
* Bloody discharge from the ear
* Pain in the ear
* Drooping eyelids
* Loss of balance and coordination including circling

A veterinarian can diagnose an inner ear infection in a dog using x-rays of the head and an examination with an otoscope, an instrument incorporating a light and a magnifying lens used to examine the eardrum and the external canal of the ear.

The dog will have to be anesthetized to allow the vet to flush out the wax and other buildup within the ear before using the otoscope. If the ear drum is then found to be infected, discolored and full of fluid, a definite diagnoses of an inner ear infection is assured. The dog may not have an infection of the outer ear but if it has an inner ear infection, it will have an outer ear infection as well.

If the inner ear infection is mild it can be treated with antibiotics administered orally or by injection. Many vets will also prescribe a topical anti-fungal cream along with antibiotic ointments. For chronic or more severe infections, the middle ear has to be flushed out and then treated. It may also be necessary to cut open the ear drum to drain it of fluids.

Preventing inner ear infections requires that you feed your pet a healthy diet and see that it gets regular grooming to ward off ear infections. Early diagnosis and treatment of outer ear infections will also help prevent any inner ear infections.

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Breathing Problems in Dogs

Monday, June 9th, 2014

Breathing problems in dogs can be caused by something as normal as sneezing, a runny nose, a cough or teary eyes. These reactions are common in dogs and nothing you should worry about. However, if you notice your dog is suddenly having difficulty breathing, it could indicate a simple respiratory infection or it may be signs of a more serious disease.

Some of the most critical breathing problems in dogs include Respiratory Cancer, Kennel cough, Pneumonia, Fungal Infections, Cryptococcosis, Valley Fever, Asthma, Laryngeal Paralysis, and Aspergillosis.

Respiratory Cancer is found less often than any other form of cancer in dogs, although it is not unheard of for tumors to form in a dog’s lungs having spread from cancer in other parts of its body. The most common form of this Respiratory Cancer occurs in a dog’s nasal sinus passages.

Kennel cough is a mild yet highly contagious disease that affects the upper respiratory system. If not treated properly it can develop into fatal bronchopneumonia or chronic bronchitis in puppies and in older inactive dogs who spend most of their time sleeping or just lying around the house.

The factors that increase a dog’s susceptibility to kennel cough are stress, temperature and humidity. For a dog to catch Kennel cough it has to inhale the bacteria that causes the disease. The most likely dog to catch the disease is one who has been kept in a shelter or kennel (hence the name) with close contact to other dogs.

Pneumonia is an inflammation of the lungs and the most common types of pneumonia are bacterial and fungal infections . You can spot a dog with pneumonia because it will have difficulty breathing, cough a lot, have a fever, and more than likely, lose its appetite.

Fungal Infections are another cause of respiratory problems in dogs.

Cryptococcosis is a systemic disease that affects a dog’s respiratory tract, its eyes, skin and central nervous system. This fungus is commonly found in soil and in chicken and bird droppings. The infection causes lesions on the face, legs and lungs and it can quickly spread to a dog’s central nervous system. Once the fungus reaches the dog’s brain, there is little hope of saving the dog.

Valley Fever affects dogs that live in dry areas of the southwestern U. S. Luckily the fungus in not very contagious and most dogs develop an immunity to it.

Asthma is a rare condition in which the air passages to a dog’s lungs fill with mucus, then swell and spasm. This limits the amount of air that can reach a dog’s lungs, causing wheezing, coughing and an inability to easily catch its breath. Asthma is fairly easy to recognize because the symptoms are the same as those in humans.

Laryngeal Paralysis symptoms include noisy breathing, an intolerance to exercise or walking, vomiting, coughing, and the inability to catch its breath. The larynx, or voice box, is located in the throat and connects the mouth and nasal passages. The muscles attached to the larynx become paralyzed due to the dysfunction of nerves in the throat and cause serious breathing problems.

If your dog’s breathing sounds like a freight train trying to climb up a steep incline, you can safely assume it has Laryngeal Paralysis. This is a disease that requires veterinarian care.

Aspergillosis is a serious disease affecting a dog’s mucous membranes and nasal chambers. It is most common in younger dogs, especially those breeds with long noses. Symptoms include sneezing, nasal pain and lethargy. If not treated, the fungus can easily grow to the point where it destroys the dog’s nasal passages and infects its skull and eyes.

Breathing problems in dogs should never be ignored. If they are, the chances of your dog’s recovery and survival will be significantly reduced if it does not receive the necessary treatment in the early stages of the disease.

Always watch for breathing problems in your dog and contact your veterinarian if any of these symptoms persist or get worse.

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