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The #1 source for immediate, long-term relief for dogs suffering from degenerative diseases like hip dysplasia, OCD and arthritis.

We are specialists in the treatment of canine joint disease and its accompanying pain.

Let us help put an end to your dog’s suffering, joint stiffness, pain, immobility, and poor quality of life. Our proven products will help you easily accomplish this without the use of drugs or invasive surgery.

Joint Issues

  • Hip Dysplasia
  • Arthritis
  • Osteochondritis (OCD)
  • Stiffness/Inflammation
  • Ligament Tears
  • Growing Pains
  • Mobility Problems
  • Joint Pain
  • Back/Spinal Problems
  • Hypertrophic Osteodystrophy (HOD)

Symptoms

Is your pet becoming less active, less playful, or desiring shorter walks? The following symptoms could be early signs of OCD, Arthritis or Hip Dysplasia.

  • Moving more slowly
  • Difficulty getting up
  • Weight shift to another leg
  • Personality change
  • Reluctant to walk, jump or play
  • Refuses using stairs or the car
  • Change in appetite
  • Change in behavior
  • Muscle atrophy
  • Lagging behind
  • Yelping when touched
  • Limping
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Archive for the ‘Dog Diseases’ Category

Why Brush Your Dogs Teeth?

Tuesday, November 16th, 2010


Good dental health is as important for your dog as it is for you. Tartar and gingivitis are two of the most common problems in dogs and can lead to gum disease and loss of teeth. Even more serious illnesses can affect your dog if its teeth are neglected. You should brush your dog’s teeth because not cleaning them for a long period of time will result in bacterial infections that can have an effect on your dog’s heart, kidneys and liver. It is estimated that 75% to 80% of all pet dogs have some oral and dental disease by the time they are only 3 years old.

Here are some things you need to know:

Brushing your dog’s teeth – Taking care of your dog’s teeth requires that you brush your dog’s teeth daily to eliminate plaque and slow the development of tartar on his teeth. Begin brushing his teeth gradually, making it a pleasant experience rather than a upsetting one. Use a finger brush instead of a toothbrush made for humans -and use toothpaste made for pets. Don’t use your own toothpaste as it may contain ingredients harmful to your dog. After brushing his teeth, reward him with a nice little treat. These dental treats help remove tartar build up, and the combination of chlorophyll, peppermint, parsley, dill, and fennel, help freshen your dog’s breath and also aid in digestion, alleviate gas, and soothe upset stomachs.

Diet – Your dog’s diet is important and what your pet eats will definitely affect its teeth. Dry dog foods and solid, dry doggy treats will help clean the plaque from the teeth. Real bones should not be fed to your dog and should not be used to help clean its teeth. Most people think bones are healthy for dogs; after all, didn’t we grow up watching dogs eating and burying bones in TV shows and movies. But the truth is real bones are not healthy for dogs. They are dangerous because they can cause health problems for your pet. Not all vets and pet experts will agree on this, but most veterinarians can tell you horror stories about bones and dogs.

It’s always been assumed that bones are good canine treats but this is not true. A dog’s teeth can fracture because most bones are hard enough that they can cause teeth to crack. Unfortunately, this can end up with your dog requiring a root canal or tooth extraction. Obstruction of your dog’s airway can also happen if all or part of a bone slides down its throat and becomes stuck, blocking the airways and causing it to choke. If the bone is large enough it can cause death by choking. The sharp edges of bones can also cut your dog’s gums and tongue. This is certainly painful for your dog, and bones may also get stuck in its mouth between the molars of the lower jaw.

Bones can pass through your dog’s digestive tract and cause serious damage. A piece of bone may become lodged in the stomach or intestines or even up in the esophagus. If this happens it requires an emergency visit to your vet and surgery to remove the bone. If a bone doesn’t get stuck it still can cause a lot of irritation as it passes through your dog’s intestinal tract. The worst thing that can happen is when fragments of bone actually poke through the lining of the inside of the stomach or intestines and colon. At that point your dog faces a life-threatening situation.

We know dogs love bones but there are too many risks when a dog eats bones, whether the bones are raw or cooked.

The bottom line is – do not feed your dog real bones. If you feed bones to your dog because you believe that chewing is instinctive and essential for dogs, try a safe alternative instead. Remember that dog’s need their teeth just as much as we do, and I have yet to see dentures for doggies or dental implants, which if they were available, certainly wouldn’t be covered by doggie Medicare!

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Classic Tails Vol. 1 – “For Whom The Bell Tolls”

Tuesday, October 12th, 2010


Classic Tails Vol. 1 – “For Whom The Bell Tolls” has been revised for dog lovers.

“For Whom The Bell Tolls” is a good war action story written by a human named Ernest Hemingway. In this superb novel, an American dog joins a band of armed gypsies fighting in the Spanish Civil War. He sincerely believes that one dog can make a difference in the war. The dog is soon given the task of finding a way to blow up a key bridge situated behind enemy lines. No small job for someone with no opposable thumbs. But he doesn’t let a small thing like that stop him from his appointed duty.

As this heroic epic unfolds, he also falls in love with Maria, a beautiful Spanish-bred female dog fond of wearing bright red flamenco skirts.

The book opens with our hero dog lying on the “pine-needled floor of the forest” and closes as he feels his heart pounding against the “pine needle floor of the forest”; he ends as he begins. While lying amidst the pine needles, he keeps wishing he had some Winston’s Digest All to alleviate the gas, bloating, and flatulence he was experiencing from the nasty meal he’d been served by some guy claiming to be the cook.

Three crucial days in the dog’s life force him to question his own role in a pointless war. He wonders if dying for a political cause might be a waste of life (it certainly would be a waste of MY life!), but he ultimately believes that dying to save another dog is the most heroic act a hero can perform.

The book’s title is taken from John Donne’s celebrated poem: “No man is an Island … and therefore never send to know for whom the bell tolls; It tolls for thee.” It is about the integrated fabric of all life: What happens to one dog happens to all.

“For Whom the Bell Tolls” has also been regarded as Hemingway’s submission to critics who barked that his writing style was too spare. But Hollywood loved the book and the hero dog subsequently became an even more popular canine hero on the big screen.

“For Whom the Bell Tolls” ranks as one of the great American war novels of all time. If Hemingway were still alive I am sure he would be more than pleased to write a novel starring me, Wotan, as the invincible hero of a novel.

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What Is Hip Dysplasia In Dogs – Part 1

Friday, October 1st, 2010


Hip Dysplasia in dogs is a disease that seriously affects the hip joint that attaches a dog’s hind leg to its body.

The hip joint is a ball-and-socket joint. The ball portion is the head of the femur and the socket is located on the dog’s pelvis. In a normal joint the ball rotates freely within the socket. The dog’s bones are shaped to perfectly match each other, with the socket surrounding the ball. In order to strengthen the hip joint, a strong ligament holds the two bones together. This ligament attaches the femur head directly to the socket. The joint capsule is a very strong band of connective tissue that circles the two bones and provides stability for a dog’s rear legs. The area where the bones actually touch each other is smooth and cushioned with a layer of spongy cartilage. The joint also contains a thick fluid that lubricates the joint. In a dog with normal hips, all of these components work together and help the joint function smoothly which supports the dog in maintaining stability.

Hip dysplasia is a result of abnormal joint structure and a slackness of the muscles, the connective tissue, and the ligaments that support the joint. As a dog’s joint problem continues to worsen, the surfaces of the two hip bones begin to separate in the joint and cause structural changes in the bone surfaces. Most dogs are born with normal hips but if their genetic background includes a tendency for hip dysplasia or arthritis, the soft tissues that surround the hip joint will develop abnormally and cause hip dysplasia. Hip dysplasia can affect both the right and left hips but often will affect only one side.

Dogs of all ages are subject to hip dysplasia. Usually hip dysplasia symptoms don’t begin to show up in a dog until the middle or later years of its life, although puppies as young as five or six months may begin to display pain and discomfort during and after exercise. The condition will usually worsen until all normal activities become too painful for the dog to tolerate. You can help your dog recover its normal life through the use of Winston’s Joint System, an all-natural formula developed by a Naturopathic Doctor to heal his own beloved dog who suffered from hip dysplasia. For more than 20 years this proven formula has been giving relief from pain and stiffness to all breeds and ages of dogs.

Hip dysplasia symptoms are nearly identical to arthritis symptoms which causes a dog to walk or run in a limping or odd way. A dog may avoid movement that requires fully extending or flexing its rear legs. They will also experience stiffness and pain in their rear legs after exercising or when they first get up in the morning. Climbing stairs becomes a difficult if not impossible task. As hip dysplasia progressively worsens, affected dogs will lose most of their muscle tone and may need assistance in getting up after resting in a prone position.

Which dog breeds are susceptible to hip dysplasia?

Hip dysplasia is primarily a disease of large breeds like Golden Retrievers, Labrador Retrievers, Saint Bernards, German Shepherds, Rottweilers, and Great Danes. The disease can affect medium-sized breeds also but rarely affects smaller breeds. Hip dysplasia is also primarily a disease of purebred dogs but can develop in mixed breeds if their parents were breeds of dogs prone to developing hip dysplasia.

Are there specific risk factors for developing hip dysplasia?

Hip dysplasia is caused by one of the hip joint bones moving out of place. This creates abnormal wearing away of the joint tissue and cartilage. Arthritis and pain then increase as the dog ages. It is a genetic disease, meaning if one or both of a dogs’ parents has hip dysplasia, then it is at a greater risk for developing hip dysplasia. If a dog’s lineage showed no signs of hip dysplasia, then it probably will not develop dysplasia.

Obesity can increase the seriousness of hip dysplasia in genetically susceptible dogs. If a dog is genetically prone to hip dysplasia and is also overweight, it has a much higher risk of developing hip dysplasia.

Exercise can also be factor in developing the disease. Dogs that are genetically predisposed to the disease can have an increased incidence of hip dysplasia if over-exercised when they are young. However, dogs with large leg muscles are less likely to develop hip dysplasia than dogs with small muscles. Moderate exercise such as running and swimming would be beneficial to a dog but any exercise that places a lot of pressure on the joints would not be.

Read more about hip dysplasia in Part 2 – Diagnosing and treating Hip Dysplasia

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I Got No Sympathy For My Hip Dysplasia!

Tuesday, September 21st, 2010


Remember those old TV shows like Father Knows Best or Leave it to Beaver? Remember how the errant son or daughter was always admonished with the threat, “Wait until your father gets home!”. Well, I’ll just wait until my master gets home! I got no sympathy for my hip dysplasia when I was left home alone with my master’s friend.

My master had to go to the office and he left me at home alone with his friend who decided to clean my room before the cable man came to install the new cable for my master’s computer. Well, maybe “my room” isn’t entirely true since I let my master share it. After all, his bed is in my room too so I’m content to let him think it’s his bedroom if that makes him happy.

Anyway, I was resting comfortably on my Canine Cooler Bed, happily dreaming of a bowl full of yummy Milkbones, when this friend rudely awakened me and told me to get up off my cozy bed. He hauled my bed out to the living room and told me to go lie on it there. The nerve! Who did he think he was anyway. He knew I had hip dysplasia and was taking Winston’s Joint System to support me in being more mobile, but he had no sympathy at all for me. Just because I didn’t appear to have hip joint problems anymore didn’t mean that he could just push me around like I was a dog. Oh, I almost forgot – I am a dog. Well… I meant push me around like I was a nobody. Me, the assistant master of the house after all.

I skulked back into my room, ignoring this rude person, and laid down on the floor. I was once again ordered to get out of the bedroom and go lie on my bed in the living room. I was going to stand my ground and refuse to depart “my room” but he turned on that vacuum machine that makes such an infernal racket and that did it. I hate that noise, so I left the room and went to the living room to lie on my bed.

I was NOT happy with being banished from my own room. The more I thought about it the more incensed I became. Every time this friend walked past me to go to the kitchen or other room, I gave him nasty looks. Each time he went by me I managed to look more perturbed. I didn’t shed any tears because that would have been a sign of weakness and I was not about to let this person get the upper hand on me. Since this person didn’t seem to understand my low-throated growls, I had to resort to expressions of severe displeasure. I gave him various looks that meant “Just wait until my master comes home. I’m going to tell on you!”.

After about an hour I had won the war. He came and moved me and my Canine Cooler Bed back into my room. I had won! I knew if I gave him enough callous looks he’d see things my way and move me back into my room.

When my master returned home I did my best to let him know that I had suffered indignities at the hands of his friend. He seemed to get the message and spent a lot of time (not enough, however!) petting me and saying nice things. When his friend came into the room I gave the guy the meanest looks I could conjure up. My master noticed and asked his friend what had happened to make me so hostile toward him. Boy, was I pleased. I had tried to warn the guy I was going to tell on him and now my threat came true. I wanted to prance around the room, exalting in my victory but I decided that might be a little too obvious. I was content to be fed treats and be petted and let bygones be bygones.

But let this be a warning to you, Mr. Friend – next time you kick me out of my room and move my bed, I have plans for you that you aren’t going to like!


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Dogs With Arthritis like Car Rides Too!

Tuesday, September 7th, 2010


For healthy dogs, getting to ride in a car is a very happy experience in their lives – almost as good as rolling around in the mud or digging up an old bone. But for dogs with arthritis or hip dysplasia, riding in the car can be a nerve-racking trip for your pet. What’s happening? Where are you taking me? Don’t you know I hurt?

If your dog has arthritis or hip dysplasia, getting in and out of your car is a major ordeal for him. He’s probably not going to enjoy riding in your car at all. But if you take your dog to enjoyable places like the beach, the dog park, or other excursions with you, then he’ll have a terrific ride. Here are some suggestions for making your drive fun and safe for your dog while you chauffeur him around.

Take along paper towels or old rags, and anything else you might need to clean up with if he has an accident. Be sure you have plenty of poop bags too. Take along enough drinking water and some treats. You’ll need a safety harness, or depending on your dog, you may need a crate or other carrier for the car. You’ll want to cover your seats with an old sheet or blanket if you want to protect them from stains and scratches.

The most important thing when taking your dog along for the ride is to make riding in your car a pleasant experience for him. If you are unable to help him get in and out of the car by yourself, ask a friend to come along and help you. Begin associating car trips with pleasant things. With his arthritis or hip dysplasia, he won’t be standing on the seat with his head out the window anymore, so help him settle down into a comfortable position on the back seat or in his crate. Don’t play the radio too loudly and don’t honk your horn at every fool who’s driving erratically. If your dog still seems nervous, talk to him. Always place your dog in the rear, never in the front seat, and definitely not in your lap. Not only can your dog distract you and cause an accident, but if it’s a small dog, it could be killed if your air bag deploys in an accident. Remember, the chauffeur always drives and the guest always sits in the back seat.

If you have a pickup truck, don’t let your dog ride in the open back or hang his head out the window of the cab. It’s too easy for a dog to jump, or to fall out of a truck bed or open window. Sniffing the breeze by hanging his head out an open window can be dangerous too if a rock or other object on the road is kicked up into his face.

Please use a seatbelt! Buckle up laws are not only for humans. In some states, seatbelts are now mandatory for dogs. Using a dog harness in combination with a seatbelt will protect your dog by keeping him from hitting the windshield or being thrown out of your car in case of an accident or sudden stop. It will also protect you and your passengers from being hit in the head by a flying dog! In an accident, your pet could become a dangerous projectile, endangering his life as well as that of anyone riding in your vehicle. Personally, I use the BUCKLE UP pet restraint whenever I travel with my dog. This is the only dog-restraint that has a patented chest-vest design that provides maximum protection to my dog. It’s comfortable enough that he eagerly lets me slip it on him, knowing we’re off for another fun trip somewhere. If I have to hit the brakes fast because some fool who shouldn’t be driving has nearly run me off the road, the pressure from the vest is spread out all over his chest making it safer for him without any unnecessary compression on his chest which could injure him. Of course he always gives me a sideways look whenever this happens – as if it’s my fault!

If you need to use a crate, be sure to secure it so it doesn’t slide around the rear. You may feel this is being a bit obsessive, but think what could happen if you suddenly hit the brakes or crashed into something and the crate came flying to the front.

Bottom line is – car trips with your ailing dog can be enjoyable for both of you if you take a few safety precautions and do some advance preparation to prevent anxiety and stomach upset for your dog. That way, both of you are more likely to enjoy the ride. So let’s hit the road!

Do you have a dog with hip dysplasia or dog arthritis that has adapted well to riding in your car or do you still have problems? How did you solve your dog’s nervousness about riding in your car? Do you have any hilarious incidents you want to share with our readers?

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