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The #1 source for immediate, long-term relief for dogs suffering from degenerative diseases like hip dysplasia, OCD and arthritis.

We are specialists in the treatment of canine joint disease and its accompanying pain.

Let us help put an end to your dog’s suffering, joint stiffness, pain, immobility, and poor quality of life. Our proven products will help you easily accomplish this without the use of drugs or invasive surgery.

Joint Issues

  • Hip Dysplasia
  • Arthritis
  • Osteochondritis (OCD)
  • Stiffness/Inflammation
  • Ligament Tears
  • Growing Pains
  • Mobility Problems
  • Joint Pain
  • Back/Spinal Problems
  • Hypertrophic Osteodystrophy (HOD)

Symptoms

Is your pet becoming less active, less playful, or desiring shorter walks? The following symptoms could be early signs of OCD, Arthritis or Hip Dysplasia.

  • Moving more slowly
  • Difficulty getting up
  • Weight shift to another leg
  • Personality change
  • Reluctant to walk, jump or play
  • Refuses using stairs or the car
  • Change in appetite
  • Change in behavior
  • Muscle atrophy
  • Lagging behind
  • Yelping when touched
  • Limping
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Archive for the ‘Dog Diseases’ Category

Hip Dysplasia in Golden Retrievers

Tuesday, December 7th, 2010


Hip dysplasia in Golden Retrievers is a genetic disorder, an inherited instability of the dog’s joints which is common in the breed.

The Golden Retriever was first developed in Scotland, the original breeding being a cross between a male yellow-colored Retriever with a Tweed Water Spaniel female dog.

Some variations exist between the British type Golden Retrievers prevalent throughout Europe and Australia, and those of American lines, and these differences are reflected in the breed standard. The muzzle of the British type of dog is wider and shorter, and its forehead is blockier. It has shorter legs, with a slightly deeper chest, and a shorter tail. Its features make it generally heavier than the American Retriever. The eyes of the European type are noted for their roundness and darkness as contrasted with the triangular or slanted composition of American Golden Retrievers.

Retriever’s coat colors range from a light golden color to dark golden. The Golden’s coat can also be mahogany colored, which is referred to as “redhead”. As a Golden grows older, its coat can become darker or lighter, along with a noticeable whitening of the fur on and around the muzzle. A puppy’s color is usually much lighter than its adult coat.

Golden Retrievers shed moderately to heavily, shedding year round, especially in the spring and early summer. The coat and undercoat are dense and waterproof, and may be straight or moderately wavy.

The temperament of the Golden Retriever is described as kindly, friendly and confident. They are equally friendly with both strangers and those familiar to them. Their trusting, gentle disposition makes them a poor guard dog. Unprovoked aggression or hostility towards people, dogs or other animals is not in keeping with the character of the breed. The typical Golden Retriever is calm and naturally intelligent, with an exceptional eagerness to please.

Golden Retrievers are also noted for their intelligence, ranking fourth after the Border Collie, Poodle, and German Shepherd. Goldens are one of the brightest dogs ranked by obedience command trainability. These dogs are also renowned for their patience with children.

The average life span for a Golden Retriever is 11 to 11½ years.

Golden Retrievers are susceptible to genetic disorders like hip and elbow dysplasia which is common in the breed. Hip dysplasia is an inherited instability of the dog’s joints. This instability can be compounded by environmental factors such as injury to the joint and by dietary factors such as pushing rapid growth in puppies.

It is not possible to predict when or even if hip dysplasia will occur in a Golden. However, there are some easily noticeable symptoms of hip dysplasia which include moving more slowly, difficulty in getting up or lying down, reluctance to walk, jump or play, refusing to use stairs or get into the car, muscle atrophy, limping, yelping when touched, changes in appetite, and personality changes.

X-rays are the easiest way to diagnose hip dysplasia in a Golden Retriever. A vet will evaluate the joints and take into consideration any symptoms like those listed above because sometimes an x-ray won’t reveal the full extent of the dog’s pain. The vet will also consider the dog’s movements and any evidence of lameness before making a diagnosis.

When a Golden is diagnosed with hip dysplasia and the choices for treatment seem limited to expensive surgery or questionable drugs, many holistic vets recommend you begin treating your dog with Winston’s Joint System, an all-natural formula developed by a Naturopathic Doctor to heal his own beloved dog. This proven formula has been giving relief from pain and stiffness to all breeds and ages of dogs for more than 20 years.

Although there is no actual cure for canine hip dysplasia, arthritis, or osteochondrosis (OCD), regular treatment with Winston’s Joint System will give immediate and long-term relief without drugs.

Winston’s is a combination of three, totally-natural whole food supplements developed by a Naturopathic Doctor for his own dog. There are no side-effects because it’s just good whole food. In addition, there are no dosage problems because the dog’s body uses only what it needs.

Surgery is normally only considered in cases of hip dysplasia if all other treatments have failed to improve the dog’s condition. This procedure is expensive and the recovery time for a dog can be considerably lengthened if the post-surgical dog is not cared for properly. The desired result of any surgical procedure is to provide an acceptable quality of life for the dog, so surgery should be considered only if a vet is reasonably certain of success.

The best way to treat hip dysplasia is of course to prevent it. Before buying a puppy, be sure it has been certified free of hip dysplasia. Certified-free parents are not guaranteed to have dysplasia-free pups.

You want your beautiful Golden to be with you as long as possible so be alert to any signs or symptoms of hip dysplasia or arthritis, and begin early treatment of your pet with Winston’s Joint System.

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Hip Dysplasia in Large and Older Dogs

Tuesday, November 30th, 2010


Hip dysplasia in large and older dogs is medically referred to as Canine Hip Dysplasia (CHD) and is a common disease in large breeds and older dogs. But it can also affect dogs of any age and breed, although it’s rarer in small breeds.

Hip dysplasia is genetically transmitted from a dog’s parents or grandparents, but because multiple genes are involved, scientists have not been able to determine the pattern of inheritance. Adding to the problem of causation is the complicated interplay between heredity and the environment. Environmental factors can also have an influence on whether or not a particular dog or breed of dog will eventually develop hip dysplasia. Canine hip dysplasia is the most common orthopedic problem in dogs and is caused by a loose hipbone to thighbone connection leading to hind joint pain and lameness ranging from mild to severely crippling.

Hip dysplasia is a very debilitating disease and painful for the poor dog who has to suffer with it.

Canine hip dysplasia most often affects these breeds:
Golden Retrievers
Labrador Retrievers
German Shepherds
Great Danes
Pit Bulls
Mastiffs
Doberman Pinschers
Saint Bernards

Early symptoms of hip dysplasia include:
Changes in gait, including a “bunny hop” walk
Sitting rather than standing
Difficulty getting up
Crying or yelping when an affected joint is moved or touched
Signs of pain during and after activity
Pain in the rear legs and hips, especially in the mornings
Trouble climbing stairs or running
Avoiding normal activities like a morning or evening walk

These symptoms of hip dysplasia may seem like gradual changes that are common to an aging dog, but by noticing these physical signs in the early stages, an owner can prevent further pain and suffering for their dog and improve the dog’s mobility and activity levels before the disease has developed to the point that surgery or powerful medications are required.

Dogs who do suffer with joint diseases such as arthritis, osteochondrosis (OCD), hip dysplasia and other degenerative joint problems can experience immediate and long-term relief with a regimen of Winston’s Joint System.

Winston’s Joint System is a combination of three, totally-natural whole food supplements developed by a Naturopathic Doctor for his own dog. There are no drugs in Winston’s and there are no side-effects because it’s just good whole food. And there are no dosage problems because the dog’s body uses only what it needs.

Winston’s provides many of the raw materials essential for the synthesis of the joint-lubricating synovial fluid as well as the repair of articular cartilage and connective tissue. Within the first 30 days of treatment, dogs on Winston’s Joint System show noticeable and often remarkable improvement.

Hip dysplasia is a genetic disease that often can’t be prevented. It is a progressively degenerative disease, so any measure of prevention you can take at an early stage will improve the quality of your dog’s life for years. If you own a large breed dog like one of those listed above, or your dog is a senior dog showing signs of joint disease, you owe it to your faithful companion to start him on Winston’s Joint System as soon as possible.

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Arthritis, Dogs and Dinosaurs

Friday, November 26th, 2010


Arthritis is one of the oldest diseases known to mankind. Surprisingly, science has shown that dinosaurs also had arthritis and there is evidence that early humans had the same chronic aches and pains. So it’s understandable that dogs can develop arthritis also. In fact, arthritis is a common disease affecting man’s best friend.

Did you know that managing your dog’s arthritis can help you better manage your own arthritis? Owning and being responsible for a pet dog can give you a positive outlook on life, improve your attitude and give a lift to your spirits. It is a fact that pet-owners tend to live longer and average fewer visits to their doctor’s office.

Arthritis affects dogs of all ages just as it affects people of all ages. If you notice changes in your dog’s mood and activity, and it doesn’t seem to be feeling too good, you may think it has a cold or stomach virus, but it could be arthritis. Arthritis affects one in every five adult dogs in the U.S. and is one of the most common sources of chronic pain that veterinarians treat.

The question then remains, how do you know if it’s arthritis? Your dog can’t tell you what’s wrong with it, so it’s important to watch for non-verbal cues and take even subtle changes seriously.

There are certain signs that your dog may have arthritis. You may notice it favoring one leg, experiencing difficulty sitting or standing, sleeping more, appearing to have stiff or sore joints, being hesitant to jump, run or climb stairs, gaining weight, being less interested in playing, demonstrating a decrease in normal activity, displaying changes in attitude or behavior, and being less alert.

If your dog displays any of these symptoms for more than two weeks, schedule an appointment with your veterinarian for an arthritis evaluation, which will involve a physical exam and X-rays. The best thing you can do for your dog to help manage arthritis is to get a diagnosis from the vet and start a treatment plan as soon as possible.

Recommended treatments may include the following:

(1) A healthy diet and exercise to help maintain proper weight

(2) Working with your veterinarian to find a drug treatment using nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS) which is the most common form of pharmaceutical treatment for arthritis in dogs

(3) Over-the-counter pet treatments, such as food containing either glucosamine and chondroitin sulfate or Omega fatty acids. These have been shown to offer some help in relieving the symptoms of arthritis in dogs

(4) A veterinarian-prescribed anti-inflammatory drugs and an over-the-counter treatment that together may help decrease pain and disease progression.

The most complete and effective treatment I have discovered for my own 8 year old Great Dane who has arthritis, is Winston’s Joint System, a combination of three, totally-natural whole food supplements developed by a Naturopathic Doctor for his own dog. With Winston’s there was no need for drugs, and my dog has never suffered from the common side-effects caused by the drugs because Winston’s is just good whole food. And I don’t have to be concerned about dosage problems either because my dog’s body uses only what it needs.

Within the first 30 days after I started treating my dog with Winston’s Joint System, he began to show significant improvement in his arthritis symptoms.

No matter how you choose to treat your dog’s arthritis, make sure you work with your veterinarian to ensure that you select the best program that helps your loving companion. Early diagnosis and treatment, maintaining a healthy weight, and regular exercise are critical in treating a dog with arthritis.

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Why Brush Your Dogs Teeth?

Tuesday, November 16th, 2010


Good dental health is as important for your dog as it is for you. Tartar and gingivitis are two of the most common problems in dogs and can lead to gum disease and loss of teeth. Even more serious illnesses can affect your dog if its teeth are neglected. You should brush your dog’s teeth because not cleaning them for a long period of time will result in bacterial infections that can have an effect on your dog’s heart, kidneys and liver. It is estimated that 75% to 80% of all pet dogs have some oral and dental disease by the time they are only 3 years old.

Here are some things you need to know:

Brushing your dog’s teeth – Taking care of your dog’s teeth requires that you brush your dog’s teeth daily to eliminate plaque and slow the development of tartar on his teeth. Begin brushing his teeth gradually, making it a pleasant experience rather than a upsetting one. Use a finger brush instead of a toothbrush made for humans -and use toothpaste made for pets. Don’t use your own toothpaste as it may contain ingredients harmful to your dog. After brushing his teeth, reward him with a nice little treat. These dental treats help remove tartar build up, and the combination of chlorophyll, peppermint, parsley, dill, and fennel, help freshen your dog’s breath and also aid in digestion, alleviate gas, and soothe upset stomachs.

Diet – Your dog’s diet is important and what your pet eats will definitely affect its teeth. Dry dog foods and solid, dry doggy treats will help clean the plaque from the teeth. Real bones should not be fed to your dog and should not be used to help clean its teeth. Most people think bones are healthy for dogs; after all, didn’t we grow up watching dogs eating and burying bones in TV shows and movies. But the truth is real bones are not healthy for dogs. They are dangerous because they can cause health problems for your pet. Not all vets and pet experts will agree on this, but most veterinarians can tell you horror stories about bones and dogs.

It’s always been assumed that bones are good canine treats but this is not true. A dog’s teeth can fracture because most bones are hard enough that they can cause teeth to crack. Unfortunately, this can end up with your dog requiring a root canal or tooth extraction. Obstruction of your dog’s airway can also happen if all or part of a bone slides down its throat and becomes stuck, blocking the airways and causing it to choke. If the bone is large enough it can cause death by choking. The sharp edges of bones can also cut your dog’s gums and tongue. This is certainly painful for your dog, and bones may also get stuck in its mouth between the molars of the lower jaw.

Bones can pass through your dog’s digestive tract and cause serious damage. A piece of bone may become lodged in the stomach or intestines or even up in the esophagus. If this happens it requires an emergency visit to your vet and surgery to remove the bone. If a bone doesn’t get stuck it still can cause a lot of irritation as it passes through your dog’s intestinal tract. The worst thing that can happen is when fragments of bone actually poke through the lining of the inside of the stomach or intestines and colon. At that point your dog faces a life-threatening situation.

We know dogs love bones but there are too many risks when a dog eats bones, whether the bones are raw or cooked.

The bottom line is – do not feed your dog real bones. If you feed bones to your dog because you believe that chewing is instinctive and essential for dogs, try a safe alternative instead. Remember that dog’s need their teeth just as much as we do, and I have yet to see dentures for doggies or dental implants, which if they were available, certainly wouldn’t be covered by doggie Medicare!

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Classic Tails Vol. 1 – “For Whom The Bell Tolls”

Tuesday, October 12th, 2010


Classic Tails Vol. 1 – “For Whom The Bell Tolls” has been revised for dog lovers.

“For Whom The Bell Tolls” is a good war action story written by a human named Ernest Hemingway. In this superb novel, an American dog joins a band of armed gypsies fighting in the Spanish Civil War. He sincerely believes that one dog can make a difference in the war. The dog is soon given the task of finding a way to blow up a key bridge situated behind enemy lines. No small job for someone with no opposable thumbs. But he doesn’t let a small thing like that stop him from his appointed duty.

As this heroic epic unfolds, he also falls in love with Maria, a beautiful Spanish-bred female dog fond of wearing bright red flamenco skirts.

The book opens with our hero dog lying on the “pine-needled floor of the forest” and closes as he feels his heart pounding against the “pine needle floor of the forest”; he ends as he begins. While lying amidst the pine needles, he keeps wishing he had some Winston’s Digest All to alleviate the gas, bloating, and flatulence he was experiencing from the nasty meal he’d been served by some guy claiming to be the cook.

Three crucial days in the dog’s life force him to question his own role in a pointless war. He wonders if dying for a political cause might be a waste of life (it certainly would be a waste of MY life!), but he ultimately believes that dying to save another dog is the most heroic act a hero can perform.

The book’s title is taken from John Donne’s celebrated poem: “No man is an Island … and therefore never send to know for whom the bell tolls; It tolls for thee.” It is about the integrated fabric of all life: What happens to one dog happens to all.

“For Whom the Bell Tolls” has also been regarded as Hemingway’s submission to critics who barked that his writing style was too spare. But Hollywood loved the book and the hero dog subsequently became an even more popular canine hero on the big screen.

“For Whom the Bell Tolls” ranks as one of the great American war novels of all time. If Hemingway were still alive I am sure he would be more than pleased to write a novel starring me, Wotan, as the invincible hero of a novel.

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