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We are specialists in the treatment of canine joint disease and its accompanying pain.

Let us help put an end to your dog’s suffering, joint stiffness, pain, immobility, and poor quality of life. Our proven products will help you easily accomplish this without the use of drugs or invasive surgery.

Joint Issues

  • Hip Dysplasia
  • Arthritis
  • Osteochondritis (OCD)
  • Stiffness/Inflammation
  • Ligament Tears
  • Growing Pains
  • Mobility Problems
  • Joint Pain
  • Back/Spinal Problems
  • Hypertrophic Osteodystrophy (HOD)

Symptoms

Is your pet becoming less active, less playful, or desiring shorter walks? The following symptoms could be early signs of OCD, Arthritis or Hip Dysplasia.

  • Moving more slowly
  • Difficulty getting up
  • Weight shift to another leg
  • Personality change
  • Reluctant to walk, jump or play
  • Refuses using stairs or the car
  • Change in appetite
  • Change in behavior
  • Muscle atrophy
  • Lagging behind
  • Yelping when touched
  • Limping
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Archive for the ‘Dog Diseases’ Category

What Is Hip Dysplasia In Dogs – Part 1

Friday, October 1st, 2010


Hip Dysplasia in dogs is a disease that seriously affects the hip joint that attaches a dog’s hind leg to its body.

The hip joint is a ball-and-socket joint. The ball portion is the head of the femur and the socket is located on the dog’s pelvis. In a normal joint the ball rotates freely within the socket. The dog’s bones are shaped to perfectly match each other, with the socket surrounding the ball. In order to strengthen the hip joint, a strong ligament holds the two bones together. This ligament attaches the femur head directly to the socket. The joint capsule is a very strong band of connective tissue that circles the two bones and provides stability for a dog’s rear legs. The area where the bones actually touch each other is smooth and cushioned with a layer of spongy cartilage. The joint also contains a thick fluid that lubricates the joint. In a dog with normal hips, all of these components work together and help the joint function smoothly which supports the dog in maintaining stability.

Hip dysplasia is a result of abnormal joint structure and a slackness of the muscles, the connective tissue, and the ligaments that support the joint. As a dog’s joint problem continues to worsen, the surfaces of the two hip bones begin to separate in the joint and cause structural changes in the bone surfaces. Most dogs are born with normal hips but if their genetic background includes a tendency for hip dysplasia or arthritis, the soft tissues that surround the hip joint will develop abnormally and cause hip dysplasia. Hip dysplasia can affect both the right and left hips but often will affect only one side.

Dogs of all ages are subject to hip dysplasia. Usually hip dysplasia symptoms don’t begin to show up in a dog until the middle or later years of its life, although puppies as young as five or six months may begin to display pain and discomfort during and after exercise. The condition will usually worsen until all normal activities become too painful for the dog to tolerate. You can help your dog recover its normal life through the use of Winston’s Joint System, an all-natural formula developed by a Naturopathic Doctor to heal his own beloved dog who suffered from hip dysplasia. For more than 20 years this proven formula has been giving relief from pain and stiffness to all breeds and ages of dogs.

Hip dysplasia symptoms are nearly identical to arthritis symptoms which causes a dog to walk or run in a limping or odd way. A dog may avoid movement that requires fully extending or flexing its rear legs. They will also experience stiffness and pain in their rear legs after exercising or when they first get up in the morning. Climbing stairs becomes a difficult if not impossible task. As hip dysplasia progressively worsens, affected dogs will lose most of their muscle tone and may need assistance in getting up after resting in a prone position.

Which dog breeds are susceptible to hip dysplasia?

Hip dysplasia is primarily a disease of large breeds like Golden Retrievers, Labrador Retrievers, Saint Bernards, German Shepherds, Rottweilers, and Great Danes. The disease can affect medium-sized breeds also but rarely affects smaller breeds. Hip dysplasia is also primarily a disease of purebred dogs but can develop in mixed breeds if their parents were breeds of dogs prone to developing hip dysplasia.

Are there specific risk factors for developing hip dysplasia?

Hip dysplasia is caused by one of the hip joint bones moving out of place. This creates abnormal wearing away of the joint tissue and cartilage. Arthritis and pain then increase as the dog ages. It is a genetic disease, meaning if one or both of a dogs’ parents has hip dysplasia, then it is at a greater risk for developing hip dysplasia. If a dog’s lineage showed no signs of hip dysplasia, then it probably will not develop dysplasia.

Obesity can increase the seriousness of hip dysplasia in genetically susceptible dogs. If a dog is genetically prone to hip dysplasia and is also overweight, it has a much higher risk of developing hip dysplasia.

Exercise can also be factor in developing the disease. Dogs that are genetically predisposed to the disease can have an increased incidence of hip dysplasia if over-exercised when they are young. However, dogs with large leg muscles are less likely to develop hip dysplasia than dogs with small muscles. Moderate exercise such as running and swimming would be beneficial to a dog but any exercise that places a lot of pressure on the joints would not be.

Read more about hip dysplasia in Part 2 – Diagnosing and treating Hip Dysplasia

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I Got No Sympathy For My Hip Dysplasia!

Tuesday, September 21st, 2010


Remember those old TV shows like Father Knows Best or Leave it to Beaver? Remember how the errant son or daughter was always admonished with the threat, “Wait until your father gets home!”. Well, I’ll just wait until my master gets home! I got no sympathy for my hip dysplasia when I was left home alone with my master’s friend.

My master had to go to the office and he left me at home alone with his friend who decided to clean my room before the cable man came to install the new cable for my master’s computer. Well, maybe “my room” isn’t entirely true since I let my master share it. After all, his bed is in my room too so I’m content to let him think it’s his bedroom if that makes him happy.

Anyway, I was resting comfortably on my Canine Cooler Bed, happily dreaming of a bowl full of yummy Milkbones, when this friend rudely awakened me and told me to get up off my cozy bed. He hauled my bed out to the living room and told me to go lie on it there. The nerve! Who did he think he was anyway. He knew I had hip dysplasia and was taking Winston’s Joint System to support me in being more mobile, but he had no sympathy at all for me. Just because I didn’t appear to have hip joint problems anymore didn’t mean that he could just push me around like I was a dog. Oh, I almost forgot – I am a dog. Well… I meant push me around like I was a nobody. Me, the assistant master of the house after all.

I skulked back into my room, ignoring this rude person, and laid down on the floor. I was once again ordered to get out of the bedroom and go lie on my bed in the living room. I was going to stand my ground and refuse to depart “my room” but he turned on that vacuum machine that makes such an infernal racket and that did it. I hate that noise, so I left the room and went to the living room to lie on my bed.

I was NOT happy with being banished from my own room. The more I thought about it the more incensed I became. Every time this friend walked past me to go to the kitchen or other room, I gave him nasty looks. Each time he went by me I managed to look more perturbed. I didn’t shed any tears because that would have been a sign of weakness and I was not about to let this person get the upper hand on me. Since this person didn’t seem to understand my low-throated growls, I had to resort to expressions of severe displeasure. I gave him various looks that meant “Just wait until my master comes home. I’m going to tell on you!”.

After about an hour I had won the war. He came and moved me and my Canine Cooler Bed back into my room. I had won! I knew if I gave him enough callous looks he’d see things my way and move me back into my room.

When my master returned home I did my best to let him know that I had suffered indignities at the hands of his friend. He seemed to get the message and spent a lot of time (not enough, however!) petting me and saying nice things. When his friend came into the room I gave the guy the meanest looks I could conjure up. My master noticed and asked his friend what had happened to make me so hostile toward him. Boy, was I pleased. I had tried to warn the guy I was going to tell on him and now my threat came true. I wanted to prance around the room, exalting in my victory but I decided that might be a little too obvious. I was content to be fed treats and be petted and let bygones be bygones.

But let this be a warning to you, Mr. Friend – next time you kick me out of my room and move my bed, I have plans for you that you aren’t going to like!


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Dogs With Arthritis like Car Rides Too!

Tuesday, September 7th, 2010


For healthy dogs, getting to ride in a car is a very happy experience in their lives – almost as good as rolling around in the mud or digging up an old bone. But for dogs with arthritis or hip dysplasia, riding in the car can be a nerve-racking trip for your pet. What’s happening? Where are you taking me? Don’t you know I hurt?

If your dog has arthritis or hip dysplasia, getting in and out of your car is a major ordeal for him. He’s probably not going to enjoy riding in your car at all. But if you take your dog to enjoyable places like the beach, the dog park, or other excursions with you, then he’ll have a terrific ride. Here are some suggestions for making your drive fun and safe for your dog while you chauffeur him around.

Take along paper towels or old rags, and anything else you might need to clean up with if he has an accident. Be sure you have plenty of poop bags too. Take along enough drinking water and some treats. You’ll need a safety harness, or depending on your dog, you may need a crate or other carrier for the car. You’ll want to cover your seats with an old sheet or blanket if you want to protect them from stains and scratches.

The most important thing when taking your dog along for the ride is to make riding in your car a pleasant experience for him. If you are unable to help him get in and out of the car by yourself, ask a friend to come along and help you. Begin associating car trips with pleasant things. With his arthritis or hip dysplasia, he won’t be standing on the seat with his head out the window anymore, so help him settle down into a comfortable position on the back seat or in his crate. Don’t play the radio too loudly and don’t honk your horn at every fool who’s driving erratically. If your dog still seems nervous, talk to him. Always place your dog in the rear, never in the front seat, and definitely not in your lap. Not only can your dog distract you and cause an accident, but if it’s a small dog, it could be killed if your air bag deploys in an accident. Remember, the chauffeur always drives and the guest always sits in the back seat.

If you have a pickup truck, don’t let your dog ride in the open back or hang his head out the window of the cab. It’s too easy for a dog to jump, or to fall out of a truck bed or open window. Sniffing the breeze by hanging his head out an open window can be dangerous too if a rock or other object on the road is kicked up into his face.

Please use a seatbelt! Buckle up laws are not only for humans. In some states, seatbelts are now mandatory for dogs. Using a dog harness in combination with a seatbelt will protect your dog by keeping him from hitting the windshield or being thrown out of your car in case of an accident or sudden stop. It will also protect you and your passengers from being hit in the head by a flying dog! In an accident, your pet could become a dangerous projectile, endangering his life as well as that of anyone riding in your vehicle. Personally, I use the BUCKLE UP pet restraint whenever I travel with my dog. This is the only dog-restraint that has a patented chest-vest design that provides maximum protection to my dog. It’s comfortable enough that he eagerly lets me slip it on him, knowing we’re off for another fun trip somewhere. If I have to hit the brakes fast because some fool who shouldn’t be driving has nearly run me off the road, the pressure from the vest is spread out all over his chest making it safer for him without any unnecessary compression on his chest which could injure him. Of course he always gives me a sideways look whenever this happens – as if it’s my fault!

If you need to use a crate, be sure to secure it so it doesn’t slide around the rear. You may feel this is being a bit obsessive, but think what could happen if you suddenly hit the brakes or crashed into something and the crate came flying to the front.

Bottom line is – car trips with your ailing dog can be enjoyable for both of you if you take a few safety precautions and do some advance preparation to prevent anxiety and stomach upset for your dog. That way, both of you are more likely to enjoy the ride. So let’s hit the road!

Do you have a dog with hip dysplasia or dog arthritis that has adapted well to riding in your car or do you still have problems? How did you solve your dog’s nervousness about riding in your car? Do you have any hilarious incidents you want to share with our readers?

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Hip Dysplasia in a Golden Retriever – Part 5

Friday, September 3rd, 2010


Wotan may have hip dysplasia but he sure loves Kosher Pickles.

Pickle dog and restaurant excitement

Wotan and I live in Palm Springs, California where we are lucky to have many restaurants with outdoor patios where Wotan is welcome to lie at my feet while I enjoy a relaxing lunch or dinner. Obviously he can’t go inside the restaurants because he’s not a service dog.

It’s still quite warm during these hot summer months but the outdoor patios often have misters that cool the air and lower the temperature about 10 degrees, even when it’s a 100 degrees or more in the shade.

Last week we visited one of my favorite places, a Thai restaurant owned by a woman and her two daughters who came here several years ago from Thailand and opened the restaurant. Of course Wotan and I sat outside on the outdoor patio, and with the misters it was quite comfortable. Before I ordered lunch I asked to change tables because the sun was shining directly into my eyes and I was given a table under a big shady umbrella.

At the table next to us sat two orthodox rabbis dressed all in black. That’s not an uncommon sight here but I noticed them because they were sitting directly in the hot sun and I wondered how they were able to handle the heat dressed like that. I ordered a tropical iced tea and the waitress brought Wotan a bowl of fresh, cold water. Inscribed on the bowl were the words “For our four-legged customers”.

I was halfway through my tasty Pad Thai when one of the Rabbis leaned over and said , “You have a beautiful dog, Sir.”

I thanked him and continued eating my salad.

“How old is he?”

I didn’t immediately realize that the Rabbi was speaking to me again. “Oh, he’s going to be 13 in October”, I answered.

“Really,” said the Rabbi. “He looks very healthy for a dog that old. I have a brother who has a Golden Retriever also. That poor dog has been having a lot of trouble with his hips – arthritis, or hip something or other – I can’t remember for sure. His dog has lots of problems just trying to stand up, and he limps badly when he walks. The dog has trouble with both of his rear legs. The vet gave him a prescription drug of some kind, but the dog seems to be getting worse.”

“He probably has hip dysplasia like my dog”, I said.

“Hmm, sounds similar to what my brother called it. But you must be joking with me about your dog not being well. I noticed him when you first came in and he sure doesn’t look like he has anything wrong with him at all. He looks very healthy – especially for as old as you say he is. He jumped right up when you changed tables.”

I told him that Wotan did indeed have and that he had suffered terribly with it for more than a year. I said he used to take a lot of time just standing up and also lying back down – like an old man with arthritis. He seemed sad all the time and he wasn’t able to go on walks and do the things he always enjoyed like riding in the car, jumping up on my bed and watching TV with me.

“I wish my brother’s dog could get better like yours has. That dog is number one in my brother’s house. His wife and kids love that dog to death and that’s what makes it so hard when the poor animal struggles to get up and down and has lost all interest in playing with the kids or going out for walks with my brother or his wife.”

“Your brother could probably get the same results with his dog that I have with Wotan,” I told him. “I found some natural supplements online at a place called DogsHealth.com. The product is Winston’s Joint System and it was developed by a doctor who needed to cure his own pet dog and couldn’t find anything safe and effective to help the dog so he decided to formulate his own. Once I started giving my dog those supplements he started getting better even in the first week. And now he doesn’t have any problems getting up and down.”

“Tell your brother to go online and find DogsHealth.com and order the Winston’s Joint System. It works. Here’s living proof right in front of you.”

“I thank you for the advice. I will tell my brother when I visit with them tomorrow night. By the way, does your dog like kosher pickles? My brother’s dog loves them.”

I said, “ I don’t know as he’s never had one, but he loves to eat just about anything “.
“Would it be alright if I offered him a pickle?”

“It’s okay with me. If he likes the smell of it he’ll eat it.”

The Rabbi offered Wotan the pickle and he scarfed it down.

”He sure seemed to like that,” said the Rabbi. “Can I give him another?”

“I don’t think he’d say no. Actually, he’s fixated on your other pickle right now. Just be careful he doesn’t chomp on your finger. When he really likes the taste of something he gets a little too eager to eat it.”

The Rabbi got up from the table, lifted the kosher pickle in the air and Wotan jumped up and swallowed it in one bite. The Rabbi smiled and said, “You are a good pickle retriever and you know kosher when you taste it, don’t you.”

The couple at the table on the other side of me were watching the entire pickle transaction and they enticed Wotan to come get their kosher dills too. Soon Wotan was flitting from table to table eating one kosher pickle after another. As he ran from one table to the next the waitress tripped over him and dropped a tray filled with two bowls of noodles. That in itself was not a crisis except the noodles went all over Wotan’s back. I would have expected him to freak out at that but instead he calmly started licking them off every part of his body he could reach. This brought cheers and clapping from some of the other customers and someone shouted, “Bring that dog a martini!”

I was horrified and offered to pay for the dishes, heck I was ready to DO the dishes after the chaos Wotan had just created. The waitress kept apologizing profusely but it wasn’t her fault and I told her I was very sorry for the mess. Meanwhile, Wotan was having a heyday, going from table to table where he was being offered shrimp, bites of hamburger, and more kosher pickles. I paid the bill, apologized to everyone and hurried out the door; me feeling guilty, and Wotan looking fat and happy with a bellyful of yummy foods.

I know Wotan and I will be going out to eat together again and even though I really love the food there, I think we better wait a while before trying that particular restaurant again. At least until they clean the noodles off the floor!

Do any of you have a favorite restaurant where you’re allowed to take your pet? Let us know the name and the city, I’m sure the restaurant owners would appreciate the mention.

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Hip Dysplasia in a Golden Retriever -Part 4

Tuesday, August 31st, 2010


The hip dysplasia in my Golden Retriever continues to improve every week. There are some days that aren’t as good as the others but he is still so much more alert, mobile, and happier than he was before he started on Winston’s Joint System formula for his hip dysplasia.

Wotan A Desert Guide Dog

We go on walks every day even though the vet said it wasn’t necessary because he’s an old dog and should just be exercised minimally. She doesn’t know that he’s recently renewed his friendship with several other dogs in the neighborhood. There’s a Miniature Schnauzer, a Pomeranian, a German Shepard, and a King Charles Spaniel that occasionally join us on our neighborhood walks whenever we’re out and about at the same time. What is so encouraging to me is to see Wotan keep up with all of them even though their ages range from 3 years to 8 years old. Wotan is the “granddaddy” of the group but that doesn’t stop him from leading the pack.

A couple of the dog’s owners asked me what I’d done to improve Wotan’s health so much. They’d all seen him laconic and suffering so many times when his hip dysplasia started getting really bad. When I told them he was taking a natural formula developed by a doctor for his own pet dog, they wouldn’t believe me. I even had to show the Winston’s Joint System bottles to one of the guys – a real no-nonsense ‘show-me-the-money’ kind of guy. He read and re-read the ingredients, and kept looking at Wotan, who was obviously convinced that the guy was just dying to give him a treat or bone, or some goody to eat.

I offered the neighbor a beer and we sat down to shoot the (you know what). He began telling me that he had a German Shepard as a pet when he was in his teens and the dog developed arthritis to the point where he couldn’t even stand up to make it outside to go to the bathroom. His father had the dog put down because it was such a problem to the family. He had cried and cried for days he said. At fourteen, he felt he had lost the only thing in the world that really loved him. He admitted he’s been living in fear that his pet German Shepard was going to end up with the same terrible problem.

I said, “Take a look at Wotan. You remember how bad he looked during the last year and how we’d stopped going on walks with all of you. If your dog develops arthritis or hip dysplasia, the first thing you should do is log on to DogsHealth.com and order Winston’s Joint System.” Personally, I hope this horrible disease never strikes his pet but if it does I know he’ll be able to restore his dog to good health in a short period of time, and he won’t be wasting money or valuable time trying drugs and procedures that won’t work.

Well, I hope you’ll come back and check out some more pictures of Wotan as he continues to improve in all aspects of his life. Do you have any” before and after” photos of your dog who has been helped by Winston’s Joint System? If so, please email us a copy of your loving pet.

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